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Geryow Gwir: The lexicon of revived Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2014. Second edition, revised and enlarged. ISBN 978-1-78201-068-5.

If one compares the vocabulary laid out in the handbooks of revived Cornish with the lexicon of the traditional texts, one is struck by how different are the two. From the beginnings Unified Cornish in the 1920s it appears that revivalists have tended to avoid words borrowed from English, replacing them with more “Celtic” etyma. Indeed the more Celtic appearance the vocabulary of both Welsh and Breton seems to have been a source of envy to some Cornish revivalists. From Nance onwards such purists have believed that English borrowings disfigured Cornish and in some sense did not belong in the language. They considered that revived Cornish would be more authentic, if as many borrowings as possible were replaced by native or Celtic words. Since there is no sizeable community speaking revived Cornish as a native language, we are compelled to rely on the only native speakers available to us, namely the writers of the traditional texts. We must follow them as closely as we can. It is to be hoped that this book will in some small measure assist learners of Cornish to speak and to write a form of the language more closely related to what remains to us of the traditional language.

Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog)
By Jerome K. Jerome, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by A. Frederics
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-056-2

The author and his two friends, George and Harris, agree that they have been working too hard and that their health in consequence is suffering. The three young men decide therefore to take a boating holiday on the Thames, starting at Kingston and ending in Oxford. They also take Montmorency, their pet terrier with them. The book recounts their adventures and mishaps on the trip and is punctuated by numerous hilarious passages about, for example, being trapped in Hampton Court Maze, the unreliabilty of barometers and the problems involved in learning to play the bagpipes. Three Men in a Boat was first published in 1889 and has never been out of print since-a remarkable testimony to its popularity.

Tredden in Scath (Heb Gwil Mencyon a’n Ky)
By Jerome K. Jerome, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by A. Frederics
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-055-5

Yth yw an screfor ha'y dhew gothman, Jory ha Harrys, acordys y dhe vos ow lavurya re grev i'n dedhyow dewetha hag indella aga yêhes dhe sùffra. Yma an try den yonk ytho owth ervira kemeres degolyow in scath wàr Dhowr Tamys, ow tallath dhyworth Kyngston hag ow mos bys in Resohen. Ymowns y ow kemeres Montmorency, hèn yw aga broghky, gansans inwedh. Yma acownt rës i'n lyver a'ga aventurs hag a'ga droglabmow wàr an trumach; yth yw kefys ino inwedh lies whedhel wharthus, rag ensompel, ow tùchya bos prysonys in ker droya Lës Hampton, andhiogeleth barometrow ha'n problemow usy ow pertainya dhe dhesky an pîbow sagh. Y feu Tredden in Scath dyllys rag an kensa prës i'n vledhen 1889 ha nyns êth ev bythqweth mes a brynt dhia an termyn-na-dùstuny apert a'y vos meurgerys gans pùb henath

Treasure Island
By Robert Louis Stevenson, with illustrations by Louis Rhead
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-33-6, ISBN 978-1-782010-53-1 (paperback)

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos in the winter of 1881–1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915. The Cornish translation is by Nicholas Williams, who also translated Louis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Cornish and into Irish.

Enys Tresour
By Robert Louis Stevenson, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by Louis Rhead
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-59-6. ISBN 978-1-78201-50-0 (paperback)

Y feu screfys Enys Tresour gans Robert Louis Stevenson i’n bledhynyow 1880 hag 1881. Dalethys veu in Braemar in Scotlond, le may whrug y das gwil gweres dhodho gans y brevyans y honen a vêwnans in gorholyon. Gorfednys veu an novel pàn esa Stevenson in Davos rag an secùnd treveth in gwâv an vledhen 1881-1882. Enys Tresour, neb a dheuth in mes pàn o an auctour udnek bledhen warn ugans bloodh, o y kensa romans hir, ha pàn veu an lyver dyllys avell lyver, Stevenson a recêvas dredho rag an kensa prës sowena in lagasow an bobel. An whedhel-ma a dhalathas apperya in mis Hedra 1881 i’n lyver termyn Sowsnek gelwys Young Folks. I’n termyn-na Cog an Mor, bò Enys Tresour o an tîtel, saw pàn veu dyllys an novel avell lyver in mis Mê 1883, an hanow o Enys Tresour yn udnyk, ha’n hanow-na a gemeras y le in mesk tîtlys a lyvrow classyk liesgweyth cotha. Y fëdh gwelys i’n lyver-ma delinyansow bryntyn Louis Rhead, a veu dyllys rag an kensa prës i’n vledhen 1915. Nicholas Williams a drailyas an lyver-ma dhe Gernowek. Ev a drailyas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland gans Lewis Carroll dhe Gernowek ha dhe Wodhalek Wordhen kefrës.

Slí an Eolais agus Eagna an Ghaeil
Cormac Ó Cadhlaigh a scríobh.
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-049-4

Seo eagráin nua, in aon imleabhar amháin, de "Slí an Eolais" agus "Eagna an Ghaeil", leis an Ollamh Cormac Ó Cadhlaigh. Bailiúchán téarmaí, seanfhocal, nathanna cainte, agus blúirí litríochta is seanchais, agus iad rangaithe de réir téama (mar shampla, baill bheatha an duine, sláinte, am agus aimsir, clann agus muintir) atá in "Slí an Eolais". Leabhar coimhdeach "Slí an Eolais" é "Eagna an Ghaeil", a bhfuil míniú ann ar sciar mór de na seanfhocail atá in "Slí an Eolais" maille le míniú ar neart nathanna cainte eile agus sleachta machnaimh ar ghnéithe éagsúla den saol. Tá lear eolais agus saibhreas teanga sa dá shaothar seo, roinnt mhaith de ligthe i ndearmad, b'fhéidir, agus an té a shúfaidh chuige a bhfuil iontu, saibhreofar go mór a chur amach ar Éirinn agus ar a teanga. Tá léargas suimiúil iontu, leis, ar an saol in Éirinn sna 1920idí (an tráth a foilsíodh an dá leabhar) agus ar na tréithe a bhain leis-an mórtas cine, an chráifeacht, agus ciall do stair agus do dhúchas na hÉireann.

The Naked Octopus: Erotic haiku in English with Japanese translations
By Gabriel Rosenstock, translated into Japanese by Mariko Sumikura, and illustrated by Mathew Staunton.
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-048-7

With "The Naked Octopus" Irish writer Gabriel Rosenstock returns to the poetic form he has made his own: the haiku. The 73 haiku in this collection chart the imaginings and adventures of an amorous octopus who (the personal pronoun cannot be avoided here) emerges from the ocean to consummate his longstanding love for a human woman. As with Hokusai's famous woodcut "The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife", nothing is left to the imagination and Rosenstock represents this fantastical union with an intensity and vividness unparalleled in English-language haiku writing today. Provocative, humorous, and profoundly sensual, these gem-like poems plunge us into the long tradition of Japanese tentacle erotica, revealing a crystal clear awareness of both the natural world and human sexuality.

Ia Aventures as Alice in Daumsenland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Sambahsa by Olivier Simon
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-047-0

Lewis Carroll eet id autornam os Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, mathematique docent in Christ Church, Oxford. Eys maschourst narno gnahsit unte un eremsayr ep id Tems in Oxford dien 4 Jul 1862. Dodgson eet hamrahn unte tod excursion ab Reverend Robinson Duckworth ed tri yun piegs: Alice Liddell, iam decatu dugter ios Decan os Christ Church, ed Alices dwo swesters, Lorina ed Edith, quas eent tridemat ed octat. Kam deict id introductor poem, ias tri piegs iskweer un storia ud Dodgson, quige iabs binarrit, preter protievol-ye, un auwal version ios storia quod vahsit bihe Ia Aventures as Alice in Daumsenland. Itak sont pelu pwolkohlen references ad i penkwe naukmussafers eni idpet texte ios buk, quod buit vipublien in 1865.

Towards a Cornish Philosophy: Values, Thought, and Language for the West Britons in the Twenty-First Century
By Alan M. Kent, with a foreword by Mathew Staunton.
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-045-6

Since the inception of Cornish Studies, the matter of Cornish Philosophy has suffered considerable neglect. Philosophy is a field in which humanity investigates problems connected with reality and existence; in so doing, investigating values, thought and language. Like other minority communities and peoples across the globe, the Cornish should be asking what makes them who they are. In this vital corrective, Towards a Cornish Philosophy, Alan M. Kent offers an initial study of the basic beliefs, attitudes and concepts belonging to the Cornish over time. Not only is the relationship of Cornish Philosophy to Celtic Studies examined, but so is its relationship to Romanticism, and the Enlightenment, culminating in observations on the philosophy of the Cornish language, Cornu-English, and the West Britons' obsession with memory, place and stone.

Алесіны прыгоды ў Цудазем’і
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Belarusian by Max Ščur
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-044-9

Льюіс Кэрал—гэта псэўданім; сапраўднае імя аўтара—Чарлз Латўідж Додсан, ён быў выкладчыкам матэматыкі ў коледжы Крайст-Чэрч у Оксфардзе. Додсан распачаў свой аповед 4 ліпеня 1862 г., калі ў веславым чоўне выправіўся з Оксфарду ў вандроўку па Тэмзе, разам з пастарам Робінсанам Дакўартам, дзесяцігадовай Эліс Лідэл (дачкой дэкана коледжу) і ейнымі дзьвюма сёстрамі, трынаццацігадовай Ларынай і васьмігадовай Ідыт. Як ясна вынікае зь верша на пачатку кнігі, дзяўчаткі папрасілі Додсана расказаць ім казку, і ён, спачатку неахвотна, пачаў апавядаць ім першы варыянт гісторыі. Ува ўсім тэксьце шмат прыхаваных адсылаў да пяці ўдзельнікаў паездкі; сама кніга была ўрэшце апублікаваная ў 1865 г. Гэтая публікацыя - першае беларускамоўнае выданьне Льюіса Кэрала ў кніжнай форме.

An tSlaivéin
A novel by Panu Petteri Höglund, with illustrations by Mathew Staunton.
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-043-2

Úrscéilín é seo a chaitheas súil ar an tSlaivéin, tír bheag shamhailteach in Oirthear na hEorpa. Chonaic muintir na tíre seo an tUileloscadh agus an Stailíneachas, ach níor briseadh a meanma ná a misneach faoi bhrú na staire gránna seo féin. Anois, áfach, gheal lá na saoirse agus d’imigh scáil an tSóivéadachais, ach tháinig géarchéim nua ag bagairt ar an tír ón taobh istigh. Fear óg íogair é Adam Jokamies a tháinig i gcrann i gCríoch Lochlann, beag beann ar an gcineál cruatan a ndeachaigh muintir na Slaivéine tríd. D’fhág an tSlaivéin faoi dhraíocht é, áfach, agus é ag tabhairt aghaidhe ar an tír anois le teanga na tíre a fhoghlaim. Tá an t-úrscéal seo ag cur thar maoil le cultúr agus le cuimhní cinn Oirthear na hEorpa, rud is annamh a d’fheicfeá i litríocht na Gaeilge. Ach is scéal grá é chomh maith, agus é ar na cinn is earótai sa teanga.

De Lissel ehr Erlebnisse im Wunnerland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Palatine German by Franz Schlosser
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-042-5

Lewis Carroll ist ein Pseudonym: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson war der wirkliche Name des Autors, und er war Mathematikdozent in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson begann seine Erzählung am 4. Juli 1862, als er zusammen mit Reverend Robinson Duckworth und der zehnjährigen Alice Liddell, der Tochter des Dekans der Christ Church und ihren beiden Schwestern, Lorina (dreizehn Jahre) und Edith (acht Jahre) auf der Themse eine Bootsfahrt machte. Wie aus dem Gedicht am Anfang des Buches deutlich wird, baten die drei Mädchen Dodgson um eine Geschichte, und er begann, zunächst widerstrebend, ihnen die erste Version davon zu erzählen. Es gibt immer wieder halb versteckte Hinweise darauf im Laufe des gesamten Buches, das 1865 schließlich veröffentlicht wurde.

The Secret of the Sleeveen
By Brenda Ennis, illustrated by Thomas Ryan
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-041-8

Talk of the Sídhe is taboo in her house. But a sneak look at a chart of her family tree puts Aisling in detective mode. Her grandmother, Bláithin, had disappeared long ago and was presumed dead. Were the hot-tempered volatile Sídhe behind it? This Hallow'een she trespasses on their land and plunges headlong into their madcap subterranean otherworld. The capricious, malicious sídhe force a stinging potion (Helleboraster Maximus) down her throat, shrink her small enough to fit in a sliotar, puck her about senseless in a hurling war, and chain her newly found friend Fachtna to the dungeon walls on death row. Risking everything, she sets out to rescue Fachtna and Bláithín before undertaking her own perilous escape. This tale steeped in Irish mythology will delight readers of all ages.

Соня въ царствѣ дива: Sonja in a Kingdom of Wonder.
By Lewis Carroll
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-040-1

The first Russian translation of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland appeared in Moscow in 1879, fourteen years after the publication of original. It bore the title Sonja in a Kingdom of Wonder and was printed by Mamonov's Press. The text was printed in Old Russian orthography, using the old letters (that is, і, ѣ, ъ after consonant endings, etc.) that were annihilated or changed for the present ones early in the twentieth century. No name of the author, illustrator, or translator appeared on the title page, and the identity of the translator is to this day a matter of speculation. There are now many Russian translations of Alice, but Sonja is the first, and the only one done within Carroll's lifetime, presumably with his knowledge, and there­by must be accorded a place of honour in the canon. This book has been published in two editions: a limited hardcover black-and-white facsimile printed for the Lewis Carroll Society of North America, and this paperback colour facsimile, part of Evertype's ever-growing set of translations of the Alice books.

In the Kingdom of the Fair-eyes
By Keith Sheppard, illustrated by Helen Couper
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-039-5

Trapped by an underground rock fall, Eve and Paul stumble upon the bizarre world of the "Fair-eyes", a subterranean civilization whose society and foibles are curiously reminiscent of our own. The kidnap of a princess catapults the children into a desperate and dangerous rescue mission-but is everything as it seems? Could the pathologically stupid Goblins really have hatched this plot on their own? Are there darker forces at work? Was the princess the real target or is someone playing for even bigger stakes? Why do all your pens go missing and you keep finding unidentified keys at the back of the kitchen drawer? Let's go rescue a princess. She's a celebrity, for goodness' sake! Get her out of there...

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, illustrated by June Lornie
By Lewis Carroll, illustrated by June Lornie
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-037-1

As a child, June Lornie spent much of her life in hospital. She had to lay on her back, so she used a mirror to see what was going on around her -- and as a result, she always saw the world back to front. Because she had a mirror, she was told a story, Through the Looking-Glass, about a little girl who went through a mirror -- that little girl was called Alice. As the years went by June remained fascinated with Alice. Later in her career, June became director of the Liverpool Academy of Arts. Her illustrations for Alice started with a single work: "The Mad Tea-Party". This was soon joined by others, then, after she had had an exhibition of this first group and saw them all hanging on a wall together, she felt inspired to complete a full set of illustrations for the story, work which occupied her off and on for a further two years. She has held many exhibitions displaying her illustrations for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and plans to start illustrating Through the Looking-Glass as well.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: An edition printed in the Shaw Alphabet
By Lewis Carroll, Illustrated by John Tenniel, Foreword by Thomas Thurman
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-036-4

In his will, George Bernard Shaw left instructions (and some funds) for the development of a new regular alphabet for the English language. A design by Ronald Kingsley Read was chosen. In 1962, Shaw’s play Androcles and the Lion was printed in what became known as the Shaw Alphabet, or Shavian. This edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is written entirely in that same alphabet, with fonts specially designed by Michael Everson.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: An edition printed in the Ewellic Alphabet
By Lewis Carroll, Illustrated by John Tenniel, Foreword by Doug Ewell
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-035-7

Doug Ewell devised the Ewellic alphabet in 1980, as a form of secret writing. A decade later, after Ewell had become a supporter of the Unicode Standard, he worked to improve his alphabet’s character repertoire and encoding. Ewellic is a phonemic alphabet, like Shavian, Unifon, and shorthands such as Pitman and Gregg. With fonts specially designed by Michael Everson, this edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is written entirely in this unique featural alphabet.

Aliz kalandjai Csodaországban
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Hungarian by Anikó Szilágyi
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-034-0

Lewis Carroll álnéven írt: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson volt az igazi neve, és matematikát tanított az Oxfordi Egyetem Christ Church kollégiumában. Dodgson 1862. július 4-én kezdte el a mesét, amikor csónakkirándulásra ment a Temzén Robinson Duckworth tiszteletessel, a tízéves Alice Liddell-lel, a kollégium esperesének lányával és Alice két testvérével, a tizenhárom éves Lorinával és a nyolcéves Edith-tel. Ahogy a versben olvasható a könyv elején, a három kislány megkérte Dodgsont, hogy mondjon nekik egy mesét, ő pedig eleinte vonakodva kezdte mesélni nekik a történet első változatát. Sok félig elrejtett utalás található ennek az ötfős társaságnak a tagjaira a könyv szövegében, amely végül 1865-ben jelent meg.

An Hobad, nó Anonn agus Ar Ais Arís
By J.R.R. Tolkien, translated into Irish by Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-90-9. ISBN 978-1-78201-033-3 (paperback)

Bhí gnaoi an phobail riamh leis an sárscéal fantasaíochta seo faoi hobad darb ainm Biolbó Baigín agus é á sciobadh chun siúil gan choinne ar eachtra fhada in éineacht le Gandalf Draoi agus le trí abhac déag. Is scéal An Hobad faoi thuras a dhéanann Biolbó i gcuideachta na n-abhac le teacht ar thaisce ór a bhfuil dragan i seilbh uirthi. In aghaidh a thola ar dtús a ghlacann Biolbó Baigín páirt sa tóraíocht chontúirteach, mar is hobad gan uaillmhian é, atá an-tugtha do chompord an tsaoil. I ndeireadh na dála, áfach, cuireann sé iontas air féin lena sheiftiúlacht agus lena scil amhail buirgléir. I measc eachtraí eile buaileann Biolbó le troill, le púcaí, le habhaic, le heilbh agus le damháin alla ollmhóra, déanann sé comhrá le Smóg Dragan, agus bíonn sé i láthair go han-drogallach ag Cath na gCúig Arm. Tá Biolbó Baigín le háireamh i measc laochra neamhbhásmhara litríocht na bpáistí. Is dá pháistí féin a scríobh an tOllamh Tolkien an scéal an chéad lá agus bhain an bunleagan Béarla cáil dhomhanda amach a thúisce is a foilsíodh é. Anois tá leagan Gaeilge le fáil den chéad uair riamh in aistriúchán den scoth leis an Ollamh Nicholas Williams. Feicfear sa leabhar na pictiúir agus na léirscáileanna uile a rinne an t-údar féin.

I Met a Man from Artikelly: Verse for the young and young at heart
By Gabriel Rosenstock
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-032-6

I met a man from Artikelly
With a double chin and a double belly:
He offered me a taste of jelly—
But served it in a smelly welly.

Children will enjoy reading these zany poems to their grandparents and vice versa!

The Aventures of Alys in Wondyr Lond
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Middle English verse by Brian S. Lee, with illustrations by Byron W. Sewell
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-031-9

Middle English is the name commonly given to the forms of English current from about 1100 to roughly 1500, between pre-Conquest Old English, which is hardly intelligible today without special study, and the early modern English of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Of course it changed considerably during that period, and different dialects existed in various geographical areas. The form of Middle English used in this translation is for the most part the East Midland and London dialect of writers like Chaucer in the fourteenth century, which is the direct ancestor of our modern standard form of English. It is not hard to read with a little practice, but an extensive glossary has been provided to assist the reader where necessary. Imagining what Londoners of the fourteenth or fifteenth centuries might have made of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" provides a historical perspective not only on Chaucer's fourteenth century and Carroll's nineteenth, but on our own time as well.

Geryow Gwir: The lexicon of revived Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-030-2. OUT OF PRINT.

If one compares the vocabulary laid out in the handbooks of revived Cornish with the lexicon of the traditional texts, one is struck by how different are the two. From the beginnings Unified Cornish in the 1920s it appears that revivalists have tended to avoid words borrowed from English, replacing them with more “Celtic” etyma. Indeed the more Celtic appearance the vocabulary of both Welsh and Breton seens to have been a source of envy to some Cornish revivalists. From Nance onwards such purists have believed that English borrowings disfigured Cornish and in some sense did not belong in the language. They considered that revived Cornish would be more authentic, if as many borrowings as possible were replaced by native or Celtic words. Such a perception is perhaps understandable in the context of the Cornish language as a badge of ethnic identity. From a historical and linguistic perspective, however, it is misplaced. Cornish, unlike its sister languages, has always adopted words from English. Indeed it is these English borrowings which give the mature language of the Middle Cornish period its distinctive flavour. Cornish without the English element is quite simply not Cornish. Since there is no sizeable community speaking revived Cornish as a native language, we are compelled to rely on the only native speakers available to us, namely the writers of the traditional texts. We must follow them as closely as we can. It is to be hoped that this book will in some small measure assist learners of Cornish to speak and to write a form of the language more closely related to what remains to us of the traditional language.

An Gwyns i’n Helyk
By Kenneth Grahame, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by Ernest H. Shepard
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-029-6

Yth yw An Gwyns i'n Helyk classyk a lien flehes. Yma peswar chîff person i'n lyver, logosen dowr, goodh'or, brogh ha cronak, hag ymowns y oll ow côwsel hag owth omdhon kepar ha mebyon tus. Dhe nôtya kefrës yw kebmys a gefyr i'n novel a gevrînyeth, a aventur, a voralyta hag a felshyp inter an bestas aga honen. Sherp inwedh yw an aswonvos i'n lyver a'n dyvers dosbarthow socyal a Bow an Sowson in termyn Edward VII. An auctour, Kenneth Grahame, a ôstyas in Ostel Greenbank, Arwednak, rag termyn i'n vledhen 1907, hag ev a dhalathas screfa y novel brâs i'n tyller-na i'n form a lytherow dh'y vab, Alistair. In gwir yth hevel bos radn a natur an Cronak i'n lyver grôndys wàr Alistair Grahame y honen, a wrug y vêwnans troblys gorfedna kyns ès y ugansves pedn bloodh. Dres pùb tra aral, bytegyns, yma An Gwyns i'n Helyk ow ry dhyn pyctur a bow natùral Nans Dowr Tamys moy ès cans bledhen alebma. An novel re beu meurgerys gans flehes dhia bàn veu dyllys rag an kensa prës i'n vledhen 1908.

Sealed with a Kiss
By Rachael Lucas
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-028-9. OUT OF PRINT.

Kate breathes a sigh of relief when she’s dumped at her best friend’s wedding. Faced with moving back home, she takes a job with a cottage on the remote island of Auchenmor. Kate’s told Auchenmor is too small for secrets, but prickly new boss Roderick is keeping something to himself. When his ex-girlfriend comes back on the scene, their budding friendship comes to an abrupt end—and Kate finds out Fiona’s got a sinister motive for coming back to the island she hates. Can she be stopped before it’s too late, and will the island find its way into Kate’s heart?

An Leabhar Craicinn: Scéalta earótacha
Four erotic stories by Panu Petteri Höglund, with illustrations by Mathew Staunton.
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-027-2

Deirtear go bhfuil litríocht na Gaeilge seachantach i leith cúrsaí craicinn agus nach maith lenár gcuid scríbhneoirí lomchuntas a thabhairt ar an ngrá collaí. Chuaigh Panu Petteri Höglund i mbun pinn leis na líomhaintí seo a bhréagnú scun scan, agus seo é an toradh: ceithre scéal earótacha i nGaeilge shaibhir nádúrtha agus iad suite i saol an lae inniu. Scríbhneoir agus teangeolaí ón bhFionlainn é Panu Petteri Höglund agus é meáite ar litríocht éadrom a sholáthar do lucht na Gaeilge.

Ailis’s Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Synthetic Scots by Andrew McCallum
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-026-5

Ailis's Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies is a translation of Lewis Carroll's classic tale into synthetic Scots. Synthetic Scots is the name given by the poet Hugh Mac­Diarmid to a project that sought to rescue Scots as a serious literary language from the cloying sentimentalism and the music-hall self-mockery into which it had degenerated by the early 20th century. This project was prefigured in the work of writers like Violet Jacob and Marion Angus, Robert Louis Stevenson and George Douglas Brown. Alongside Mac­Diarmid, the project was pursued by Robert Garioch, Alastair Mackie, Alexander Scott and Sydney Goodsir Smith. Ailis's Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies is offered as a contribution to the canon of synthetic Scots texts. Because the original is such a popular and well-loved tale, skillfully crafted in simple, clear and undemanding language, but losing none of its literary excellence for all that, the hope is that Ailis will contribute to making Scots more accessible to both Scottish and non-Scottish readers alike.

Ævintýri Lísu í Undralandi
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Icelandic by Þórarinn Eldjárn
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-025-8

Lewis Carroll er dulnefni: Réttu nafni hét höfundurinn Charles Lutwidge Dodgson og var stærðfræðikennari við Christ Church í Oxford. Dodgson hóf söguna 4. júlí 1862 þegar hann var í róðrartúr á Tempsá í Oxford ásamt séra Robinson Duckworth, Alice Liddell (tíu ára) dóttur rektors Christ Church og tveimur systrum hennar, Lorinu (þrettán ára) og Edith (átta ára). Eins og fram kemur í ljóðinu fremst í bókinni höfðu stúlkurnar þrjár beðið Dodgson að segja sér sögu. Hann var tregur til en hóf þó frásögn sem varð fyrsta gerð sögunnar. Margar hálfduldar tengingar til þessara fimm bátsverja má finna víðsvegar í texta bókarinnar sjálfrar sem prentuð var í lokagerð 1865.

Gwerryans an Planettys
By H. G. Wells, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by Mathew Staunton
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-024-1

Y feu Gwerryans an Planettys dyllys in Sowsnek rag an kensa prës i’n vledhen 1898. An lyver a yll bos consydrys an kensa whedhel adro dhe “woreskydnans dre vës-estrenyon”, ha’y awedhyans wàr fuglien sciensek yw brâs dres ehen. An lyver re beu desedhys dhe’n radyo, dhe'n waryva ha dhe’n gwaya-mir, hag inspîrya hag awedhya a wrug lies ensampel a fuglien sciensek, in aga mesk jornals skethednek ha novelys grafek. Pàn vo va settys ryb Jyn an Termyn, An Den Dywel, hag Enys Doctour Moreau, yth hevel Gwerryans an Planettys moy kerys gans an bobel ès ken lyver vëth a screfas H. G. Wells. Hèm yw an kensa prës may feu an novel-ma dyllys in Kernowek.

ʻO Tāfaoga a ʻĀlise i le Nuʻu o Mea Ofoofogia
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Samoan by Luafata Simanu-Klutz
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-023-4

ʻO lēnei fāgogo—ʻO Tāfaoga a ʻĀlise i le Nuʻu o Mea Ofoofogia—na tūsia e Charles Lutwidge Dodgson i lalo o lona igoa fai, o Lewis Carroll, ma na uluaʻi lolomiina ʻiā Iulai 1865. Na soifua mai Lewis Carroll ʻiā Ianuari 27, 1832 i le nuʻu o Daresbury, Chesire, i le atunuʻu o Egelani. ʻO ona tuaʻā o ni faifeʻau ma ʻo ia o le ulumatua a ona mātua; e toʻasefulu ona uso ma tuafāfine. E ui ʻina sa iai ni faʻalētonu o lona tino, lana tautala, ma le faʻalogo, ʻae na iā te ia le tāleni o le faifāgogo ma le tusitala, ma ʻo le tusi muamua lenei na taʻutaʻua ai ʻo ia i Egelani; i le tausaga e 1932, o se tasi lēnei o tala aupito taʻutaʻua i le lalolagi ʻātoa. Na āʻoga Lewis Carroll i le āʻoga e taʻua o Christ Church lea foʻi sa faiāʻoga ai i le matāʻupu o le Matematika. ʻO ia ʻo se tagata matamuli ʻae sa fiafia e fatu ni fāgogo mo tamaiti. Na maliu ʻo ia i le tausaga e 1898.

Ma Loko o ke Aniani Kū a me ka Mea i Loaʻa iā ʻĀleka ma Laila
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Hawaiian by R. Keao NeSmith
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-022-7

He moʻolelo ʻo Nā Hana Kupanaha a ʻĀleka ma ka ʻĀina Kamahaʻo no ke kau wela i hoʻopuka ʻia e Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) no ka manawa mua ma Iulai o ka 1865. Ua pili nā kānaka he nui o loko o ia puke i ka pāʻani pepa. He moʻolelo ʻo Ma Loko o ke Aniani Kū a me ka Mea i Loaʻa iā ʻĀleka ma Laila no ke kau anu i hoʻopuka ʻia e Carroll no ka manawa mua i Kēkēmapa o ka 1871. Ma kēia moʻolelo ʻelua, ua pili nā kānaka o ka moʻolelo i ka pāʻani he mū kākela. Ma ka pau ʻana o ka puke, aia kekahi māhele o ka moʻolelo i hoʻokāpae ʻia, ʻo “Ka Nalo Hopeʻō ma ka Lauoho Kuʻi”. I kinohi, ua manaʻo ʻia e lilo ia i māhele o Ma Loko o ke Aniani Kū. ʻAʻole naʻe i hoihoi ʻo John Tenniel, ka mea nāna i kaha i nā kiʻi o ka puka mua ʻana o nā puke ʻelua, i kēia māhele, a no laila, ua kāpae ʻia akula. Ua kaha ʻia ke kiʻi uʻi e hoʻowehiwehi nei i kēia mokuna ma ke ʻano kaila o Tenniel e Ken Leeder ma ka 1977.

An Leabhar Nimhe: Scéalta agus aistriúchán
Four stories by Panu Petteri Höglund and one by S. Albert Kivinen, translated into Irish by Panu Petteri Höglund, with illustrations by Mathew Staunton.
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-021-0

Cúig ghearrscéal uafáis in aithris ar stíl an Mheiriceánaigh H. P. Lovecraft, a chruthaigh seánra nua scéalta uafáis—an tUafás Cosmach. Panu Petteri Höglund a d'aistrigh gearrscéal Kivinen go Gaeilge agus a scríobh na ceithre cinn eile a fhoilsítear faoi chlúdach leabhair anseo. Casfar uafás cosmach Lovecraft ort san Fhionlainn agus in Éirinn, i saol an lae inniu agus i saol an lae roimh an Drochshaol. Chaith Panu Petteri Höglund na blianta fada ag déanamh dianstaidéir ar Ghaeilge na gcaint­eoirí dúchais le go bhféadfadh sé scéalta a insint i stíl a mbeadh blas ceart na teanga uirthi. Is é an bailiúchán gearrscéalta seo an dara leabhar Gaeilge a tháinig óna pheann. Na scéalta leis féin a fhoilsítear anseo, chuaigh siad i gcló an chéad uair in An Gael, iris Chumann Carad na Gaeilge sna Stáit Aontaithe.

Der Alice ihre Obmteier im Wunderlaund
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Viennese German by Hans Werner Sokop
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-020-3

Des Wienerische is a ost-mittelbairischer Dialekt, reich aun Lehn- und Fremdwerter ausm Behmnischn, Italienischn, Lateinischn, Ungarischn, Frenzesischn und Jiddischn. Es is a mehrschichtiger Dialekt mit an gehobanan Stü, wiar er am Habsburger-Hof und von de Odelign gredt wurn is (Schön­brunner Wienerisch), ober aa an Oitogsstü, wiar er im Gschäftslebn und bei de eher afocheren Leit bei ihrer Oabeit oder ihre sunstign Aktivitätn Verwendung gfundn hot. De Ibersetzung vom Hans Werner Sokop – de ollererschte auf Wienerisch – is Teu aner traditionelln Mundoat­dicht­ung, zu der insbesondere de berühmtn Autorn Josef Weinheber und H. C. Artmann zöhn. Sokop hot z.B. aa Die Göttliche Komödie auf Hochdeitsch sowie Max und Moritz, Der Struwwelpeter, und Der kleine Prinz auf Wienerisch ibersetzt.

L’Aventuros d’Alis in Marvoland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Neo by Ralph Midgley
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-019-7

Lewis Carroll sar plumnam. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson sir lo vera nam del autor, ki sir profesor de matematio she Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson ensir et istorel lo 4. Jul nel anyo 1862 van il fir un jit in ropabatel ol flum Thames in Oxford, kompanat pel Rev. Robinson Duckworth, kon Alice Liddell (isanya), fel del Dekan de Christ Church, e la du soros, notye: Lorina (istreanya) ed Edith (otanya). Sar evidenta dal poem al enso del libro, ke lo tre yuninos askir Dodgson rakonti a zel un istorel. Toprime, epete ezitanda, il ensir en rakonti a zel lo prima versyon. Totye nel texto del libro, ki sir ende publikat nel anyo 1865, il riferar a zel mulyes nel libro, mo lesmode semiskelat.

Alice in Beeland
By Lillian Elizabeth Roy
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-018-0

Little Alice Wells is exploring her garden when she spies Bombus, a bumblebee, and follows him to overhear him conversing with Madam Zumm and a young bee named Buzz. They give her a special nectar which enables her to enter the Bee world, where she learns much about Bees and their life and society. Lillian Elizabeth Roy was born Lillian Elizabeth Becker in 1868 and died in 1932. She is best-known for her “Polly Brewster” series of books, published between 1922 and 1930, an interesting series about a strong-headed girl who early on declaims on the rights of women, before heading out on many adventures around the world. Alice in Beeland was published in 1919. Julia Greene illustrated a number of books beginning in 1917, including a special edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with Cut-Out Pictures. Later in her career (1918 through 1932) she illustrated the fourteen volumes of the “Curlytop” series by Howard R. Garis, who was most famous for his “Uncle Wiggily” series.

Behind the Looking-Glass: Reflections on the Myth of Lewis Carroll
By Sherry L. Ackerman, with a foreword by Karoline Leach.
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-017-3

Behind the Looking-Glass offers a fresh perspective in the ongoing, contemporary deconstruction of the Carroll Myth. Through rigorous examination of numerous myths that have been hitherto unquestioned, Ackerman skilfully positions Lewis Carroll in the theological and philosophical contexts of his time. She uncovers a Carroll whose radical religio-philosophical counter-response to patriarchal materialism moved his intellectual journey, intentionally or otherwise, deep into the waters of mysticism. The image of Carroll as a dreary Victorian conservative gives way to that of a man with wide intellectual parameters, an inquiring mind and bold, far-sighted vision. Behind the Looking-Glass demon­strates how nineteenth century currents of spiritualism, theosophy and occult philosophy co-mingled with Carroll's interest in revived Platonism and Neoplatonism, showcasing the Alice and Sylvie and Bruno books as unique points of conjunction between Carroll's intellect and spirituality. The scholarship in this work, while rigorous, is softly mixed with the kind of academic frivolity that Carroll himself might have enjoyed. Ackerman exposes a Carroll who, having lost belief in the theological and mythological master plots of earlier eras, turned toward the imaginative fiction of wonderlands rife with philosophical content in response to his instinctive hunger for cosmic coherence and existential order.

Ailice’s Anters in Ferlielann
By Lewis Carroll, translated into North-East Scots by Derrick McClure
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-016-6

The North-East dialect of Scots, locally called the "Doric", has a long and distinguished history as the medium of one of the liveliest and most individual local literatures in Scotland. It first emerged in literary form during the Vernacular Revival of the eighteenth century; an outstanding practitioner of the mid-nineteenth century was Lewis Carroll's friend George MacDonald, who, though his lasting renown is mainly founded on his children's books and fantasy stories, wrote many domestic novels set wholly or partly in his North-Eastern calf-ground, in which the dialect is skilfully presented. In translating Alice, Derrick McClure has endeavoured to find some kind of counterpart for every literary and linguistic trick in the original: that is an ambitious aim, but any translation above the level of a mere crib is a tribute to its source, and an original of such ingenuity as this book deserves the highest tribute possible, in a translation which pays full attention to all the clever and delightful tricks with which Carroll adorned his text. It is the author's hope that the translation will be read not simply as a linguistic curiosity or a test case for some of the problems of literary translation, but as a not unworthy addition to the corpus of Doric literature and Scots children's writing.

Eachdraidh Ealasaid ann an Tìr nan Iongantas
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Scottish Gaelic by Moray Watson
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-015-9

’S e ainm-pinn a th’ ann an Lewis Carroll: b’ e Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ainm ceart an ùghdair agus bha e na òraidiche le Matamataig ann an Colaiste Chrìosd, an Oilthigh Ath nan Damh. Thòisich Dodgson an sgeulachd air a’ 4mh latha den Iuchar 1862, nuair a chaidh e sgrìob ann am bàta-ràimh air an abhainn Thames ann an Ath nan Damh còmhla ris an Urramach Robinson Duckworth, còmhla ri Alice Liddell (a bha deich bliadhna a dh’aois) an nighean aig Deathain Cholaiste Chrìosd, agus còmhla ris an dithis pheathraichean aice, Lorina (a bha trì bliadhna deug), agus Edith (a bha ochd bliadhna a dh’aois). Mar a tha soilleir san dàn aig toiseach an leabhair, dh’iarr na triùir nigheanan air Dodgson sgeulachd innse dhaibh agus thòisich e, gu h-aindeonach an toiseach, a’ chiad dreach den sgeulachd innse dhaibh. Tha tòrr iomraidhean den chòignear aca an leth-fhalach ann am faclan an leabhair fhèin, a chaidh fhoillseachadh mu dheireadh thall ann an 1865. ’S e an leabhar seo a’ chiad eadar-theangachadh làn gu Gàidhlig, agus tha an leabhar a’ cleachdadh litreachadh a rèir nan gnathasan as ùire ann an Gàidhlig, na Gaelic Orthographic Conventions (2005).

Cú na mBaskerville
By Arthur Conan Doyle, translated into Irish by Nioclás Tóibín, with illustrations by Sidney Paget, edited by Aibhistín Ó Duibh
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-014-2

Tá Sir Charles Baskerville, mionuasal de chuid Devon Shasana, tar éis bás a fháil gan choinne agus dealraíonn sé gurb é an scanradh a chuir cú ábhalmhór scáfar air a thug a bhás. Creideann roinnt dá chomharsana seanscéal a deir nach ainmhí saolta an madra céanna, ach cú diabhlaí aníos ó ifreann a thaithíonn riasc sceirdiúil contúirteach na dúiche agus atá ar tí dhíobháil mhuintir Baskerville le fada. Faoi Sherlock Holmes agus an Dochtúir Watson atá sé a thaispeáint cén sórt ainmhí go fírinneach an cú agus féachaint chuige san am céanna nach ndéantar aon díobháil do Sir Henry Baskerville, mac dearthár agus oidhre Sir Charles, atá tagtha chun cónaithe in Halla Baskerville chun a oidhreacht a éileamh. Dar le go leor léirmheastóirí go bhfuil Cú na mBasker­ville ar an scéal is fearr de scéalta Sherlock Holmes agus níl aon amhras ach go bhfuil sé ar cheann de na scéalta bleachtaireachta is iomráití dár scríobhadh riamh. Foilsíodh in 1934 an t-aistriúchán Gaeilge seo de a rinne Nioclás Tóibín. Is éard atá san eagrán nua seo leagan caighdeánaithe den aistriúchán sin, arna chur in eagar ag Aibhistín Ó Duibh.

Ky Teylu Baskerville
By Arthur Conan Doyle, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by Sidney Paget
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-013-5

Syr Charles Baskerville, perhen tiryow in Pow Densher, yw ledhys yn sodyn der own a gemeras ev, dell hevel, a gy uthyk ha brâs dres ehen. Yma radn a bobel an pow ader dro ow cresy henwhedhel ow tùchya an keth ky-na. Warlergh an whedhel coth nyns yw an ky best vëth a’n bës-ma saw ky iffarnak gornatùral, usy tregys wàr hal peryllys ha dygoweth an còstys-na hag usy ow trobla teylu Baskerville dres lies bledhen. Syr Henry Baskerville, noy hag er Syr Charles, yw devedhys dhe Hel Baskerville rag kemeres posessyon a’y erytans. Sherlock Holmes ha’n Doctour Watson a’s teves an devar a dhysqwedhes pëth yw an ky in gwiryoneth hag in kettermyn gwetha Syr Charles dhyworth drog. Yma lies crytycor ow consydra Ky Teylu Basker­ville dhe vos an whedhel gwella a whedhlow Sherlock Holmes. Hèm yw an kensa prës dell hevel may feu onen vëth a’n whedhlow-na dyllys in Kernowek.

The Hound of the Baskervilles
By Arthur Conan Doyle, with illustrations by Sidney Paget
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-012-8

Sir Charles Baskerville, a Devon landowner, has died suddenly, apparently from the fright given him by an enormous fearsome dog. Some of the local people believe an old legend according to which the dog is not an earthly animal, but rather a supernatural hell-hound which inhabits the area’s lonely dangerous moor and has haunted the Baskervilles for generations. It’s up to Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to show what the true nature of the hound is whilst seeing to it that no harm comes to Sir Henry Baskerville, Sir Charles’ nephew and heir who has come to live in Baskerville Hall and claim his inheritance. Many commentators consider that The Hound of the Baskervilles is the best of the Sherlock Holmes stories and it is certainly one of the best-known detective stories ever written.

Alice’s Carrànts in Wunnerlan
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Ulster Scots by Anne Morrison-Smyth
Second edition. 2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-011-1

This buk is the furst translation o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland intae Ulster Scots, a language that comes frae the Lowlans in Scotlan an thin wus brocht intae Norlin Airlan in the early 17th Century. Es it’s a dialect o Scots it haes close links wi standart Inglesh, but thur’s monie differences in baith grammer an vocabulary between the twa languages. The orthography used in this book’s based on the spellins that ir maistly used bae native taakers o Ulster Scots.

Alice’s Adventures in an Appalachian Wonderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Appalachian English by Byron W. Sewell and Victoria J. Sewell
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-010-4

Lewis Carroll’s classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into over a hundred languages, from French to Japanese to Esperanto. In this translation into the rich dialect of the Appalachian Mountains, the translators have treated the story as a folktale, in order to create the sense that the reader is listening as an adult tells the story to a child. The story has been transported from Victorian English to post-Civil-War West Virginia, into an Appalachian setting appropriate for the dialect. The spelling used aims towards a literary ortho­graphy, rather than towards a phonemic respelling of the language entirely, and so it avoids unnecessary “eye-dialect” (funkshun instead of function, and so forth). The sounds of the language used in Alice’s Adventures in an Appalachian Wonderland will certainly be familiar to most readers, but a short glossary has also been included.

Alice’s Bad Hair Day in Wonderland: A Tangled Tale
By Byron W. Sewell, Illustrated by the author
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-009-8

In this retelling of Lewis Carroll's classic tale, Alice's fall down the rabbit hole turns into a terrifying descent through the centre of the earth, accelerating her to terminal velocity, hopelessly snarling her long hair into a tangled mess, and nearly setting it alight. Things go from bad to worse as she sets out through Wonderland's familiar, yet strangely-altered places, where she encounters characters whose personalities have also radically changed. There is no timid mouse in the pool of tears she creates when weeping over the absolute mess of her hair-but rather a French sewer rat. Climbing out of the pool she encounters the last of the Dodos, the lonely, love-sick, sole survivor of his species, ended up in Wonderland by diving down another hole, narrowly managing to evade starving, voracious Dutch sailor. Travelling from place to place seeking a haircut (and at times, a shave), Alice also encounters the Queen of Hearts, who resembles an overweight Spanish beauty and who performs for Alice an energetic flamenco, leaving her Majesty too exhausted to play croquet. Instead of a Hatter, Alice meets a Hairdresser, and at one point has a close encounter of the worst kind with the Wasp from Looking-glass Land-who takes her for a tasty-looking larva. In the end, Alice's hair takes centre stage in a surprising and hilarious climax.

Alice’s Adventirs in Wonderlaand
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Shetland Scots by Laureen Johnson
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-008-1

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: da writer’s richt name wis Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, an he wis a lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began da story apo da fort o July 1862, whin he guid aff in a rowin boat apo da river Thames in Oxford, alang wi da Reverend Robinson Duckworth, wi ten year aald Alice Liddell, da dochter o da Dean o Christ Church, an her twa sisters, thirteen year aald Lorina, an Edith, at wis eight. As we see fae da poem at da begennin o da book, da tree lasses axed Dodgson for a story an, tho at first he wis kinda laith ta dö it, he began to tell dem da first version o da story. He aften smoots in some peerie half-hoidit mention o da five o dem, aa trow da text o da book itsel, at wis published at da lang an da lent in 1865. Dis book is da first owersettin o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland inta Shetland Scots, a kind o Scots spokken in Shetland at’s been influenced bi da Nort Germanic language Norn, at dee’d oot ida eighteent century. Bein a dialect o Scots, hit’s a closs freend ta standard English, but der a lock o differ atween da twa tongues baith ida grammar an ida wirds. In ony language, der aye different opeenions aboot dialect spellin; da spellin at Laureen Johnson uses here is aafil reglar, an staands weel for da language-shö’s written in her midder tongue for mony a year noo.

Esperanto-English Dictionary: Esperanta-Angla Vortaro
Compiled by Paul Denisowski, edited by Michael Everson
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-006-7 hardcover, ISBN 978-1-78201-007-4 paperback.

Esperanto, the most widely-spoken constructed international auxiliary language, was the creation of Ludwik Lejzer Zamenhof, who first published it in 1887. Today Esperanto is estimated to have between 100,000 and 2,000,000 speakers worldwide. The most complete Esperanto dictionary is the Plena Ilustrita Vortaro, which is available both online and in printed format; but since the PIV is entirely in Esperanto, the need for a modern Esperanto-to-English dictionary remains keen for many Esperantists. Paul Denisowski’s Esperanto-English Dictionary can help fill a part of that need, on the basis of its sheer size alone, with more than 52,000 headwords. This extensive dictionary was compiled both from existing glossaries and from glossaries prepared by Denisowski himself, and it contains many words not usually found in smaller dictionaries, including an abundance of scientific terms, especially from the fields of medicine and mathe­matics. It is hoped that the publication of this diction­ary will assist a new generation of Esperanto learners in their enjoyment of this unique language.

Lès-avirètes da Alice ô payis dès mèrvèyes
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Walloon by Jean-Luc Fauconnier
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-005-0

Èl walon, i vént du latin come sès cous´ dèl famîye d’oïl èy’ on l’ divisse an Walonîye, in boukèt dèl Bèljique qu’èst dins l’ sûd du payis, dins l’ pârtîye dèl Bèljique èyu ç’ qui l’ lingâdje oficièl c’èst l’ francès èt qu’on lome Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles; lôvô, lès pârlâdjes réjionâls—langues régionales endogènes—come èl champènwès, èl lorin, èl picârd èyèt l’ walon, is-ont l’ chance d’awè ène èrcon’chance oficiéle dispûs 1991. Insi, is poul’nut yèsse disfindus sins qu’on-eûche a l’ fé a muchète èy’ is poul’nut mompliyi pus ôjî’mint. Èç traducsion ci a stî scrite an walon du coûtchant, èl cén dèl réjion di Châlèrwè. C’è-st-ène réjion qu’i-gn-a toudis yeû branmint dès-industrîyes—tchèrbonâdjes, vèr’rîyes, lamin­wêrs—èyu ç’ qui dins l’ tins, lès-ouvrîs, su leû b’sogne, is n’ d’visît rén qu’an walon, dès-ouvrîs qui v’nît di tous lès quate cwins dèl réjion èt qu’ont mètu a dalâdje, pyane a pyane, ène koinè; c’èst djustumint dins ç’ koinè la qu’on-a scrît l’ traducsion.

The Railway Children
By Edith Nesbit
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-004-3

When their father is taken away under mysterious circumstances, Roberta, Peter, and Phyllis and their mother must leave their house in London to live in a small cottage in the country. Their house, called “The Three Chimneys” stands not far from a railway track, where the three have a number of adventures. They are befriended by the Station Master and Perks the Porter, and run each day down to the railway track to wave at the passing train for London, sending their love to their father. Unknown to them, a kindly “Old Gentleman” who waves to them every day from the train helps them to solve the mystery of their father’s disappearance. This classic tale by Edith Nesbit has the original illustrations by C. E. Brock.

Flehes an Hens Horn
By Edith Nesbit, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-003-6

Pàn yw aga thas kemerys dhywortans in cyrcùmstancys kevrînek, res yw dhe’n flehes, Roberta, Peder, Fylys, ha dh’aga mabm gasa aga henkyth in Loundres ha trega in chy bian in mes i’n pow. Nyns yw an chy-na, Try Chymbla y hanow, pell dhyworth an hens horn, le mayth usy an flehes ow cafos lies aventur. Mêster an Gorsaf ha’n Porthor, Perks a vëdh aga hothmans kefrës. Yma an flehes ow ponya pùb dëdh dhe lînen an hens horn wàr nans rag swaysya aga dewla orth an train dhe Loundres, hag indelma danvon aga herensa dhe “Dasyk”. Yma “Den Jentyl Coth”, caradow y nas, ow swaysya y dhorn ortans pùb jorna dhywar an train, ha heb aga godhvos, yma va worth aga gweres owth assoylya a’n mystery brâs: prag y whrug aga thas dyberth dhywortans. Edith Nesbit a screfas an whedhel classyk-ma, usy an delînyansow gwredhek gans C.E. Brock kefys ino.

Snarkmaster: A Destiny in Eight Fits. A tale inspired by Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark
By Byron W. Sewell
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-002-9

Although the author (with many previous unique Snarkian works under his belt) describes "Snarkmaster" as the final work in a trilogy, it stands alone quite distinctly as a unique, gripping tale of a power struggle between good and evil, concluding with the development of an unusual intermediate state. Most of the story takes place prior to the traditional Snark voyage (described in verse in Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark), but becomes inextricably linked with it-unless it isn’t... The literary structure of "Snarkmaster" reveals some influence of Carroll’s "Sylvie and Bruno" tales, as the characters (including the great Charles Dodgson himself) experience dream states and the appearance of at least one fairy. The comprehensive glossary and painstakingly hand-detailed maps of each of the islands in the archipelago may not be essential to follow the story, but they certainly enhance it. The meticulously hand-inked illustrations emphasize some of the important aspects of the story and provide a tropical ambiance for the text. While not necessarily a prerequisite, knowledge of Carroll’s original poem is likely to make Snarkmaster more enjoyable for most readers.

Trans la Spegulo kaj tion Alico trovis tie
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Esperanto by Donald Broadribb
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-001-2

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland estas somera rakonto, unue publikigita de Lewis Carroll (plum­nomo de Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) en julio 1865. Multaj el la personoj kaj aventuroj en tiu libro baziĝas sur ludkartaro, ekzemple la malbonhumora Reĝino de Keroj. Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, alimane, estas vintra rakonto, unue publikigita de Carroll en decembro 1871, en kiu la plejmulto de la personaro kaj aventuroj baziĝas sur ŝakludo. (Du personoj el la unua historio, la Marta Leporo kaj la Ĉapelisto, denove aperas en la dua sub aspekto de mesaĝistoj de la Blanka Reĝo, Haigha kaj Hatta.) En Through the Looking-Glass Carroll ankaŭ pli celas al plenaĝaj legantoj ol en sia antaŭa libro, uzante pli da vortludado kaj logikaj paradoksoj. Ĉe la fino de tiu ĉi libro oni ankaŭ trovos la “subpremitan” epizodon “La Vespo en Peruko”. Carroll originale intencis ke ĉi tio estu parto de Ĉapitro VIII de Through the Looking-Glass, sed li forigis ĝin nelonge antaŭ publikigado pro la instigo de John Tenniel, ilustristo de la unuaj eldonoj de ambaŭ verkoj. La specifaj cirkonstancoj pri ĉi tiu situacio estas pli detale priskribitaj en la Enkonduko al la epizodo, trovebla sur paĝoj 143–144.

Alice Through the Needle’s Eye: The Further Adventures of Lewis Carroll’s Alice
By Gilbert Adair
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-000-5

Lewis Carroll’s stories of Alice have entranced children - and grown-ups - for nearly 150 years. And more than one reader, turning the last page of "Through the Looking-Glass", must have been saddened by the thought that her adventures had well and truly come to an end. Not so! Setting himself the daily task of believing "as many as six impossible things before breakfast" (or at least before lunch), Gilbert Adair has written a delightful successor to Carroll’s two immortal fantasies. Here, with the aid of Jenny Thorne’s Tenniel-inspired illustrations, you will find characters as nonsensical as any ever encountered by Alice. The Siamese-Twin Cats joined at the tail, the kindly old Grampus and its Auto-Biography, the Welsh Rabbit with its toasted cheese and Worcestershire Sauce and many, many, more. And perhaps you too will gradually discover, as Alice does, the mysterious pattern which shapes the destiny of her dream. "Alice Through the Needle’s Eye" is both a literary tour de force and an enchantingly funny tail for children of, as they say, all ages.

Desky Kernowek: A complete guide to Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-99-2 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-95-4 paperback.

Desky Kernowek, a complete guide to Cornish, is aimed at both beginners and the more advanced student. The book uses Standard Cornish, an orthography that is at once authentic and wholly phonetic. The whole grammar of Cornish is discussed in Desky Kernowek and both Middle and Late Cornish variants are accommodated. All points of grammar and vocabulary are exemplified by instances from the traditional texts in the original spelling. A key to the exercises is given at the end of the book for those learning Cornish by themselves. Desky Kernowek contains a comprehensive phrase-book taken exclusively from traditional Cornish. It also contains a detailed discussion of initial mutation, and a section on verbal usage. The book contains both Cornish-English and English-Cornish glossaries and a full index of subjects. The section on pronunciation and spelling was written by Michael Everson, a leading expert on writing systems. Professor Nicholas Williams, the author of Desky Kernowek, has been described by Philip Payton, Director of the Institute of Cornish Studies of the University of Exeter, as "the foremost scholar of the Cornish language".

The Haunting of the Snarkasbord: A Portmanteau inspired by Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark
By Alison Tannenbaum, Byron W. Sewell, Charlie Lovett, and August A. Imholtz, Jr
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-98-5

A dark, humorous parody of The Hunting of the Snark concerning what followed the Baker’s vanishing and the Crew’s continued hunt for a snark on Snark Island. Alison Tannenbaum wrote the poetry in Snarkasbord: A Crewsome Choice and also wrote notes on Byron W. Sewell’s illustrations for it. An introduction and Gardnerian-style notes have been written by August A. Imholtz, Jr in his inimitable style. This edition marks the first public publication of the poems “The Booking”, “The Recrewting”, and “The Sailing”—the three “Missing Fits” composed by Charlie Lovett. These were originally written for a secret English Snarkian Society, and were mentioned by Selwyn Goodacre in his “The Listing of the Snark” in Martin Gardner’s final version of The Annotated Hunting of the Snark. Hitherto, they have only ever been seen by the members or guests of the Society. In addition to his wonderful illustrations, Byron W. Sewell has contributed an original short story, “Forks and Soap”, which tells what happened to the Baker from the viewpoint of the Boojum. Like Lovett’s parodies, this short story has never before been seen by the public; it was issued in a very limited number to his Carrollian friends.

Nā Hana Kupanaha a ʻĀleka ma ka ʻĀina Kamahaʻo
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Hawaiian by R. Keao NeSmith
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-97-8

ʻO Lewis Carroll ka inoa kākau puke o Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898), he mea kākau puke ʻo ia ma ke ʻano hoʻopohihihi ʻōlelo a he loea makemakika pū ʻo ia ma Christ Church ma ke Kulanui o Oxford ma ʻEnelani. He hoa kamaʻāina ʻo ia no ka ʻohana Liddell: Ua nui nā keiki a Henry Liddell, a ʻo ia ke Poʻo o ke Kulanui. He hahaʻi moʻolelo ka hana a Carroll i ke kaikamahine ʻōpiopio loa, ʻo Alice (hānau ʻia i ka 1852), a me kona mau kaikuaʻana ʻelua, ʻo Lorina lāua ʻo Edith. I kekahi lā-ʻo ia ka lā 4 o Iulai 1862-ua hele aku ʻo Carroll, kona hoaloha, ʻo ke Kahu, ʻo Robinson Duckworth, a me nā kaikāmahine ʻekolu i ka huakaʻi hoehoe waʻapā no ka pāʻina awakea ma kapa muliwai. Ma kēia huakaʻi ma ka muliwai, ua hahaʻi aku ʻo Carroll i kekahi moʻolelo no kekahi kaikamahine, ʻo Alice kona inoa, a me kāna mau hana kupanaha i lalo o kekahi lua lāpaki. Ua noi aku ʻo Alice iā ia e kākau i ia moʻolelo nāna, a i ke au ʻana o ka manawa, ua paʻa ka mana hoʻāʻo mua o ka moʻolelo. Ma hope o ke kākau hou ʻana, ua puka akula ka puke ma ka 1865, a mai ia manawa mai, ua puka nā mana like ʻole o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ma nā ʻōlelo like ʻole he nui.

L’Travèrs du Mitheux et chein qu’Alice y dêmuchit
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Jèrriais by Geraint Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-96-1

Lewis Carroll ’tait l’nom d’plieunme à Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832–1898), un auteu Angliais d’niolîn et un cartchuleux au Collège Christ Church dé l’Unnivèrsité d’Oxford. I’ pâssait du temps auve la fanmil’ye Liddell: Henry Liddell, lé Douoyen du Collège, avait eune racachie d’mousses, et Carroll soulait raconter d’s histouaithes à la p’tite Alice (née en 1852) et à ses deux soeurs, Lorina et Edith. Ch’tait pouor Alice qué Carroll êcrivit l’s Aventuthes d’Alice en Êmèrvil’lie tchu fûtent publiées en 1865. En 1871 Carroll publyit eune s’gonde èrprînse des aventuthes d’Alice—chutte fais-chîn l’travèrs d’un mitheux. L’idée d’la gamme d’êchecs vînt d’s histouaithes qué Carroll soulait raconter ès soeurs Liddell quand il’ apprannaient la gamme. Mais ch’tait d’la caqu’téthie auve eune aut’ Alice, eune janne couôsinne à li tch’avait nom Alice Raikes, tch’înspithit l’thème du mitheux qu’Carroll fit sèrvi. Tout coumme ch’est les noms à Alice Liddell qué nou r’trouve dans les preunmié et dreine poésies du Travèrs du Mitheux. Ches deux livres, les Aventuthes d’Alice en Êmèrvil’lie et l’Travèrs du Mitheux, ont ’té translatés en un fliotchet d’langues. Et achteu, né v’chîn eune vèrsion Jèrriaise du s’gond.

Desky Kernowek: A complete guide to Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-99-2 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-95-4 paperback.

Desky Kernowek, a complete guide to Cornish, is aimed at both beginners and the more advanced student. The book uses Standard Cornish, an orthography that is at once authentic and wholly phonetic. The whole grammar of Cornish is discussed in Desky Kernowek and both Middle and Late Cornish variants are accommodated. All points of grammar and vocabulary are exemplified by instances from the traditional texts in the original spelling. A key to the exercises is given at the end of the book for those learning Cornish by themselves. Desky Kernowek contains a comprehensive phrase-book taken exclusively from traditional Cornish. It also contains a detailed discussion of initial mutation, and a section on verbal usage. The book contains both Cornish-English and English-Cornish glossaries and a full index of subjects. The section on pronunciation and spelling was written by Michael Everson, a leading expert on writing systems. Professor Nicholas Williams, the author of Desky Kernowek, has been described by Philip Payton, Director of the Institute of Cornish Studies of the University of Exeter, as "the foremost scholar of the Cornish language".

Gramat Volapüka
By Arie de Jong
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-94-7

Volapük is a constructed language, devised in 1879 by Johann Martin Schleyer, a Roman Catholic priest who was inspired in a dream to create an international language. Schleyer adapted the vocabulary of Volapük mostly from English, supplemented by German, French. and Latin. The grammar of Volapük is regular and relatively simple-surprisingly easier, in fact, than it looks at first. Volapük was the first proposed International Auxiliary Language to enjoy widespread popularity: it is estimated that in 1889, there were some 283 clubs, 25 periodicals in or about Volapük, and 316 textbooks in 25 languages, and that some­where between two hundred thousand and a million people had taken up study of the language. Esperanto, being similar to many European Romance languages, first appeared in 1887, and ultimately proved more popular. Today, the number of people studying Volapük is much lower than once it was, though Internet contacts have enabled Volapük enthusiasts to connect and communicate, and that new community has inspired the re-publication of this book. This Volapük grammar was written entirely in Volapük and was produced after the language reform which took place between 1921 and 1931. It has been out of print for many years, and it is hoped that its re-publication will assist a new generation of Volapük learners in their enjoyment of this unique language.

Skeul an Tavas: A coursebook in Standard Cornish
By Ray Chubb, edited by Michael Everson and Nicholas Williams
Second edition. 2013. ISBN 978-1-904808-93-0

Skeul an Tavas is a coursebook by Ray Chubb designed to meet the needs of those learning under the structure of the Languages Ladder programme of the UK Department for Children, Schools and Families. Unlike some other coursebooks, this book teaches Cornish in a “can-do” way, and does not expect students to know the finer points of Cornish grammar from the beginning. The course starts with the basics—all presented in a friendly and accessible way.

This book is aimed at the Breakthrough level of the Languages Ladder. This consists of three stages and Skeul an Tavas is divided into three parts, each corresponding to one of those stages. The book is intended for internal teacher assessment in the stages leading to Breakthrough, but the whole syllabus required by a student to take the external assessment at Breakthrough level is covered in this book.

Vom Filik e konots votik
By Frank Roger, translated into Volapük by Ralph Midgley
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-92-3

Kis jenonöv-li if tim stoponöv pianiko jü tak lölöfik? Kis ojenon-li if drims no binons bai spets olik. Fütür obik binon-li ya po obs? Bäts yofamaplada binons-li bai lesags onas. Sötobs-li küpälön ad büosagans? Mögos-li das fin tima binon te timafin? Konots konleta at pladons säkis alsotik. Semiks lofons i gesagis. At no binons ai trodiks, e no binons zesüdiko gesags kelis ba äspetol. Dido, nopaspetölos binon utos, kelosi bo ogetol. Konots ela Frank Roger kipädons distöfi gretik dinas, kel ninädon späktrumi lölöfik literata magälik, ed igo golon love on. Semans kanons bo tuvön fluni satüras dagik fa Philip K. Dick, ud igo fluni lovejenöfima poedik fa J. G. Ballard, igo bosili rätas e labürintas komplitiks fa Jorge Luis Borges, kels blebons in mems reidanas lunikumo kas spetoy. Ab fino omutol tuvön vegi lönik ola da länod lienetik, pestuköl fa mödotil konotas brefik. Spelobs, das oplöpol ad lükömön sefiko lü seveg, alöpio kö seveg dabinon... üf nemuiko bal dabinon.

The Burning Woman and other stories
By Frank Roger
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-91-6

What if time were to grind slowly to a standstill? What if dreams are not what you think they are? Is our future already behind us? Are fairground attractions exactly what they claim to be? Should we listen to fortune-tellers? Could it be that the end of time is merely… the end of time? The stories in this collection ask all sorts of questions. Some of them also give answers. They’re not always comforting, and not necessarily the answers you might have been expecting. Indeed, the unexpected is what you’re likely to get. Frank Roger’s stories cover a wide range of material, including and transcending the entire spectrum of fantastic literature. Some may detect an influence of Philip K. Dick’s dark satires, of J. G. Ballard’s poetic surrealism, perhaps even a dash of Jorge Luis Borges’ intricate puzzles and labyrinths, lingering in readers’ memories longer than anticipated. But in the end you will have to chart your own course through this maddening landscape constructed by a few scores of short stories. We hope you will make it safely to the exit. Wherever the exit happens to be. If there is one at all.

An Hobad, nó Anonn agus Ar Ais Arís
By J.R.R. Tolkien, translated into Irish by Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-90-9. ISBN 978-1-78201-033-3 (paperback)

Bhí gnaoi an phobail riamh leis an sárscéal fantasaíochta seo faoi hobad darb ainm Biolbó Baigín agus é á sciobadh chun siúil gan choinne ar eachtra fhada in éineacht le Gandalf Draoi agus le trí abhac déag. Is scéal An Hobad faoi thuras a dhéanann Biolbó i gcuideachta na n-abhac le teacht ar thaisce ór a bhfuil dragan i seilbh uirthi. In aghaidh a thola ar dtús a ghlacann Biolbó Baigín páirt sa tóraíocht chontúirteach, mar is hobad gan uaillmhian é, atá an-tugtha do chompord an tsaoil. I ndeireadh na dála, áfach, cuireann sé iontas air féin lena sheiftiúlacht agus lena scil amhail buirgléir. I measc eachtraí eile buaileann Biolbó le troill, le púcaí, le habhaic, le heilbh agus le damháin alla ollmhóra, déanann sé comhrá le Smóg Dragan, agus bíonn sé i láthair go han-drogallach ag Cath na gCúig Arm. Tá Biolbó Baigín le háireamh i measc laochra neamhbhásmhara litríocht na bpáistí. Is dá pháistí féin a scríobh an tOllamh Tolkien an scéal an chéad lá agus bhain an bunleagan Béarla cáil dhomhanda amach a thúisce is a foilsíodh é. Anois tá leagan Gaeilge le fáil den chéad uair riamh in aistriúchán den scoth leis an Ollamh Nicholas Williams. Feicfear sa leabhar na pictiúir agus na léirscáileanna uile a rinne an t-údar féin.

Wörterbuch der Weltsprache für Deutschsprechende: Vödabuk Volapüka pro Deutänapükans
By Arie de Jong
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-89-3.

Arie de Jong’s magnificent German-Volapük Volapük-German dictionary has been out of print for decades. It is of course well known that the popularity of the Volapük language today is nothing like what it was in 1889, but the flame of interest in Volapük has never yet been extinguished. Unfortunately, the lack of availability of a comprehensive dictionary has made it extremely difficult for people interested in Volapük to make progress learning the language; most dictionaries available as reprints, for instance, are in Johann Martin Schleyer’s Volapük Rigik (‘Original Volapük’). But modern learners need a diction­ary which reflects the reforms made in Arie de Jong’s Volapük Nulik (‘New Volapük’, a term which I prefer to Volapük Perevidöl ‘Revised Volapük’ or Volapük Pevotastidöl ‘Reformed Volapük’). The re-publication of Wörterbuch der Weltsprache: Vödabuk Vola­püka is a mile­stone in the history of constructed languages, and will, perhaps, help to keep interest in Volapük alive well into the 21st century. Volapük is a rich and flexible language, endowed with an extensive vocabu­lary. It may have no future as an International Auxiliary Lan­guage, but it nevertheless has both intellectual and aesthetic value, whether for the Esperantist interested in the history of the IAL movement, or simply for the enthusiast who comes to enjoy Volapük for its own sake.

La aventuras de Alisia en la pais de mervelias
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Lingua Franca Nova by Simon Davies
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-88-6

Lingua Franca Nova (LFN) es un lingua aidante con un gramatica simple, creolin, e lojical. Lo ia es creada par Dr C. George Boeree de la Universia de Shippensburg, Penn­sylvania, comensante en 1965. Inspirada par la Lingua Franca istorial usada sirca la Mediteraneo, lo prende se vocabulo de catalan, espaniol, franses, italian, e portuges. En 1998, LFN ia es publicida a la interede, e se parlores ia continua developa e boni la lingua tra la anios seguente. On trova aora disionarios, gramaticas, e multe otra traduis en la rede a lfn.wikia.com. La tradui raconta la aventuras de Alisia en la tempo presente, an si Carroll ia scrive los en la pasada. Esta cualia simplinte es alga comun en naras en LFN cuando la avenis es fantasin e se loca en la tempo no importa: pratical, lo evita un repete suprafluente de la paroleta “ia”. Per coere con la otra volumes en la serie, esta edita numeri se capitoles par numeros roman, an si LFN evita normal estas. On ia cambia la puntua, xef sirca parlas direta, per la mesma razona.

Lès-Aventûres d’Alice ô Pèyis dès Mèrvèy
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Borain Picard by André Capron
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-87-9

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland a sté tradwit in branmint dë langues mès, dëqu’à mèt’nant, djamins dins én dialèkte picârd. Ç’ tradukcion-ci, in picârd borégn dëvrot réparer ça. Ël langue qu’on utilîse dins ç’ tradukcion-ci, c’èst l’ dialèkte qu’on pale ô mitan dou Borinâje : 9 vilâjes avé à pô près 100.000 abitants. À côse dë cèrtégn canjemints su l’ plan économike ét social—surtout l’éducacion obligatwâre in francès—ël borégn come branmint d’ôtes dialèktes, ès’t-in trégn dë morî, môgré lès courageûs èfôrts dë deûs-twâs djins qui cach’té à l’ ravikier. I n’a pus branmint d’ Borégn qui sèt´ tënî ’ne convèrsacion in borégn, mès i d’a co ’ne masse qui counwate leû dialèkte passîv’mint. Pou l’ortografe, on a chwâzi l’ « notation Feller ».

La Aventuroj de Alico en Mirlando
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Esperanto by Donald Broadribb
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-86-2

La traduko de Donald Broadribb, Alico en Mirlando, estis unue eldonita en 1996 de Bookleaf Publishing (Bakers Hill, Okcidenta Aŭstralio). Ĉi tion sekvis dua korektita eldono publikigita en 1999 de la rusa eldonejo Sezonoj, kiu poste produktis trian eldonon en 2004. Alia eldono estis publikigita en 2000, post la apero de la dua Sezonoj-eldono sed antaŭ tiu de la tria. Ĉi tiu versio estis memeldonita interrete de Broadribb mem en PDF-formato sub la plena titolo La Aventuroj de Alico en Mirlando, kun multe da korektoj kaj plibonigoj al la teksto, inkluzive de pli klara sistemo de interpunkcio por parolata dialogo. Sezonoj ŝajne ne sciis pri ĉi tiu PDF-teksto kiam ili produktis sian eldonon de 2004, ĉar en ĉi lasta mankas la ŝanĝoj faritaj en la interreta versio. Tial, kvankam oni povus ĝuste nomi la PDFon de Broadribb la tria eldono laŭ ĝia dato de publikigo, estas plej oportune nomi ĝin la “kvara eldono”, pro tio ke Sezonoj jam uzis la nomon “tria eldono” por sia teksto de 2004. La libro kiun vi nun tenas enmane estas la kvina eldono, sen ambiguo. Ĝi baziĝas sur la PDF-teksto de 2000 kaj korektas kelkajn preserarojn kaj negravajn malkonformaĵojn kiuj restis (aŭ nove aperis) en tiu teksto; krome, vortoj nun estas kursivigitaj multloke por konformi al uzo de kursivo por montri vortemfazon en la angla originalo.

Welcome to the Crazyverse
By Keith Sheppard
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-85-5

This book contains (the author says)
Much verse on many things
Amusing quips concealing facts
Of dark ages and kings.
How Nellie Gwynn was really hot
And what made Guy Fawkes sing.

This collection of poems is loosely based on famous historical characters. Poems they may be, but not “poetry”. This is comedy in verse. What was the real story behind the gunpowder plot (and who was this guy called Fawkes)? What happened after the English Civil War? How did Rasputin meet a sticky end? All these questions and more are answered in this book. So forget those boring history lessons! Let’s have a bit of fun together but beware. You may accidentally learn some history on the way…

Phyllis in Piskie-land
By J. Henry Harris
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-84-8

J. Henry Harris 1848-1917 was a journalist, novelist, and short-story writer, probably best known for his collection of Cornish folklore, Cornish Saints and Sinners (1906). In his book Phyllis in Piskie-land, inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland, a little English girl visiting Cornwall is taken into their world and has many adventures. This rare book has been brought out again to delight Carrollians and Cornishmen alike. Phyllis in Piskie-land is in part a vehicle for Harris’ interest in Cornish folklore, but it is clear that his interest in Carroll’s work goes beyond the syntax of the title of his book. In many episodes Phyllis is taught and entertained by the denizens of Piskie-land, and like Alice she endeavours to be polite to them. Harris’ clearest homage to Carroll is in the beginning of Chapter XI, “The Charmed Shoes”, where the nonsense echoes both Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass quite strongly, leading up to the Cornish folktale which concludes the chapter.

Dee Erläwnisse von Alice em Wundalaund
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Mennonite Low German by Jack Thiessen
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-83-1

Mennonitenplaut (ooda de plautdietsche Dialektgrupp) woat enn Kanada, enne Stäts, Mexiko, Brasilien, Bolivien, Paraguay, Honduras, Belize, Argentinien von ruhm 300,000 Mennoniete jerät. Disse Zohl nemmt enn Dietschlaund too, wiels väle Mennoniete von Ruβlaund kaume nohdem de Sowjet­union utenaunda foll. Mennoniete jeheare too eene relijeese Grupp, woohne uasprinjlijch von Hollaund enn Belgien enne 1500’ Joahre flijchte, wiels see relijees vefoljt worde; mette Tiet muake see sich emm nadapraiβchem Ruhm emm Ooste tusig. Nohäa waundada väle Mennoniete noh Nuadamerika ut—besondasch noh Kanada enn noh dee Stäts—-enn noh Latienamerika—besondasch noh Paraguay enn Mexico—de measchte wohne oppem Laund, habe oba atelje spohnsche Weada enn ähre eajne Sproak oppjenohme.

L’s Aventuthes d’Alice en Êmèrvil’lie
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Jèrriais by Geraint Jennings
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-82-4

Lé Jèrriais est la langue Nouormande dé Jèrri, la langue dé Wace et achteu d’Alice étout. Quand Alice êcoute la Souothis tchi pâle dé l’histouaithe dé Dgilliaume lé Contchérant, ch’est qu’Dgilliaume, not’ Duc, pâlait l’Nouormand, et qu’l’histouaithe des Ducs dé Nouormandie fut racontée en Nouormand par Wace. Et les Jèrriais tchi d’visent acouo dans not’ langue pouôrront liéthe les aventuthes d’Alice et y r’connaître lé bouôn vièr niolîn.

The Carrollian Tales of Inspector Spectre
By Byron W. Sewell, with contributions by Edward Wakeling and August A. Imholtz, Jr
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-81-7

In the first of these two crime fiction tales, R.I.P. (Restless in Pieces), modern grave­-robbers steal the bones of Charles Dodgson (also known as Lewis Carroll), expecting to hold them for ransom. But they also dis­cover a rare first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonder­land as well as one of Dodgson’s missing Diaries in the casket. This sets off a series of events, both deadly and comical, across England, Wales, and North Korea. Inspector Ian Spectre of Scotland Yard is brought in to solve the case, assisted by none other than Dodgson’s ghost. The second tale, The Oxfordic Oracle, is set in Victorian Oxford. Inspector Spectre goes undercover to investigate numerous reported strange events during the meetings of the Oxford Phantasmalogical Society, where an actress prophesies under the influence of ethene gas escaping into the basement of the building. Charles Dodgson also makes a first time appearance at the Society meeting, which gets out of hand as too much ethene escapes and every­one begins to pro­phesy nonsense which becomes the inspiration for some of the famous poems in Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno books.

Alice’s Carrànts in Wunnerlan
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Ulster Scots by Anne Morrison-Smyth
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-80-0 OUT OF PRINT

This buk is the furst translation o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland intae Ulster Scots, a language that comes frae the Lowlans in Scotlan an thin wus brocht intae Norlin Airlan in the early 17th Century. Es it’s a dialect o Scots it haes close links wi standart Inglesh, but thur’s monie differences in baith grammer an vocabulary between the twa languages. The orthography used in this book’s based on the spellins that ir maistly used bae native taakers o Ulster Scots.

The Cult of Relics: Devocyon dhe Greryow
By Alan M. Kent, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2010. ISBN 78-1-904808-41-1 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-79-4 paperback.

The Cult of Relics is a new novel by Alan M. Kent (author of Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! and Electric Pastyland), presented in a bilingual format, with a Cornish-language translation, Devocyon dhe Greryow, by Nicholas Williams. The story is set in Western Britain in the mid-1990s just after the Gulf War, and tells of three extraordinary people: of the New-Age Traveller Jude Fox, of the American photojournalist Eddie Hopkins, and of the Cornish-born archaeologist Robert Bolitho.

The Cult of Relics yw novel nowyth dhyworth Alan M. Kent (auctour a Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! hag a Electric Pastyland), hag yma va dyllys gans trailyans Kernowek Nicholas Williams, Devoycyon dhe Greryow. An whedhel-ma a gebmer le i’n West a Vreten Veur in cres an bledhydnyow mil, naw cans, peswar ugans ha deg, termyn cot warlergh Bresel an Morbleg. Yth eson ny ow metya ino gans try ferson, meur a les: Jûd Fox, Viajyores a’n Oos Nowyth; Eddie Hopkins, an fôtojornalyst Amerycan; ha’n hendhyscansyth dhia Gernow, Robert Bolitho.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: An edition printed in the Nyctographic Square Alphabet devised by Lewis Carroll
By Lewis Carroll, Illustrated by John Tenniel, Foreword by Alan Tannenbaum
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-78-7

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a.k.a Lewis Carroll, invented a special writing instrument he called “the Nyctograph” on 24 September 1891, in frustration at the process of “getting out of bed at 2 a.m. in a winter night, lighting a candle, and recording some happy thought which would probably be otherwise forgotten”. This edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is written entirely in the author’s unique night-time alphabet.

The Beast of Bodmin Moor: Best Goon Brèn
By Alan M. Kent, translated into Cornish by Neil Kennedy, with illustrations by Gabrielle Cailes
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-77-0

Watch out… the Beast is about! This new story for young readers is based on the mysterious legend of the Beast of Bodmin Moor. The acclaimed Cornish writer Alan M. Kent tells the charming tale of how a big cat came to wander the wild landscape of Cornwall. Filled with delight and wonder, this is a tale to enrich the imagination and stay long in the memory. The illustrations are by Gabrielle Cailes, an artist who knows Cornwall intimately. With wonderful spirit, colour, and energy, they capture the detail of the story and its thrilling sense of place. The story is presented bilingually with a vibrant modern translation into Cornish by Neil Kennedy.

Áloþk’s Adventures in Goatland
By Byron W. Sewell, Illustrated by Mahendra Singh
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-76-3

Róaž Wiðz (1882–1937), the locally-admired though otherwise little-known Zumorgian translator, spent seventeen years of his miserable life (when he wasn’t tending to his beloved goats) translating Lewis Carroll’s classic “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” into Zumorigénflit and transposing it into Ŋúǧian culture. Sadly, Ŋúǧ was swallowed up by the Soviet Union in 1947. For those interested in such esoteric things, Áloþk üjy Gígið Soagénličy was first published by the Itadabükan Press in the capital city of Sprutničovyurt in 1919. The city, which was mistakenly thought to be a German forward supply area, was literally flattened and burned to the ground by Royal Air Force saturation bombing in 1943, and all that remains of it are a few remnants of the ancient Palace’s foundations and a gigantic reinforced concrete statue of Joseph Stalin, whose face has been shattered by what was probably machine gun target practice. The original story has here been updated to modern times, as if this strange, harsh, and dangerous land still existed in the modern world. It doesn’t, except in my imagination and that of Mahendra Singh, whose heart swells with the Song of the Goat. -- Byron W. Sewell

Bodily Harm: Symphysiotomy and Pubiotomy in Ireland 1944–92
By Marie O’Connor
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-75-6.

Symphysiotomy and pubiotomy carry more risk than Caesarean section: the surgery unhinged the pelvis and often led to walking difficulties, bladder problems and chronic pain. One baby in ten died. Ireland was the only country in the Western world to practise these 18th century operations in the mid to late 20th century. The revival of the surgery in 1944 raises serious questions. Was it the norm for difficult births from the 1940s to the 1980s? If not, why was it done? Bodily Harm examines the exhumation of these covert operations, reveals the circumstances under which they were carried out, documents the lived experiences of mothers, considers the surgery from a legal perspective, analyses its implications for maternity care and presents survivors’ case for truth and justice.

Whedhlow ha drollys a Gernow Goth
By Nigel Roberts, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-74-9

Whedhlow ha drollys a Gernow Goth yw viaj aberth i’n mystery henwhedhlow agan pow ny. I’n folednow-ma why a gav romauns ha pystry; anethow ha traitury; sens ha pehadoryon; gorwer ha tebelwesyon. I’n lyver-ma yma kewry meur aga mêstry ow qwandra i’n menydhyow; carrygy kevrînek ow chaunjya dhe dus vew ha tus cales aga fedn ow trailya de Sul dhe ven yeyn; yma drog-spyryjyon ow ledya tus wàr stray; knoukoryon darosvanus ow trobla an balyow; yma vertu a sawment in fentydnyow sans; ha morvoronyon, meur aga thenvos, ow qwil dhe dus dywith aga sewya aberth in morow Keltek. Nigel Robert re wrug desedha an hengof rych-ma a whedhlow hag a lien gweryn rag agan dedhyow ny ha’y dhasterivas sempel in form grafek spladn a wra plêsya pynag oll a garra delînyansow bryntyn ha whedhlow dâ..

Cornish Legend and Folklore
By Nigel Roberts
2012. ISBN 978-1-904808-73-2

Cornish Legend and Folklore is a journey into Cornwall’s mythical past. Throughout these pages you will discover magical romantic tales of adventure and intrigue; saints and sinners; heroes and villains. Where tyrannical giants roam the hills; mysterious rocks come alive and obstinate people turn to stone on the sabbath; mischievous piskeys lead simple fools astray; ghostly knockers haunt the mines; holy wells have curative powers; and alluring mermaids entice their vulnerable victims into Celtic seas. Nigel Roberts has adapted and retold this rich tradition of legend and folklore into popular and colourful graphic narrative format for those of all ages who enjoy great art and story telling.

Alix’s Adventures in Wonderland: Lewis Carroll’s Nightmare
By Byron W. Sewell, Illustrated by the author
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-72-5

Charles Dodgson had had a difficult day photographing young Victor Alexander Parnell, one of Queen Victoria’s godsons. Dodgson wasn’t at all certain of how either the boy’s parents or the Queen would regard the photograph if he let them see it. The image showed a boy with the cold and calculating gaze of a gunman that one might encounter in a saloon in the American West. It had taken no fewer than six attempts to get this image of Alexander, and Dodgson was thoroughly exhausted. The boy had twitched and squinted, blinked and shifted, ruining one plate after another. The trip back to Oxford, with all of the heavy boxes of photographic equipment, had been the final strain of a long and tiring day. By the time he finally reached his rooms he was ready for a simple meal of bread, cheese and a small glass of claret, then immediately off to bed. He would unpack the boxes later in the week, when he had recovered a bit from the expedition. Dodgson pulled the heavy curtains of his rooms together without looking out of the windows onto the quadrangle. He was under the covers and asleep in less than five minutes. And this is what he dreamed...

Breton Grammar
By Roparz Hemon, translated, adapted, and revised by Michael Everson
2011. Third edition ISBN 978-1-904808-71-8.

The first English-language edition of this Breton Grammar was published in 1995. The book is for the most part a straight forward translation of the ninth edition of Roparz Hemon’s Grammaire bretonne. In preparing the translation, a number of sections in the grammar were changed for the benefit of the English-speaking reader. Many, but not all, of these additions may be found in the notes to the various sections.

An Beybel Sans: The Holy Bible in Cornish
Translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-70-1

This is the first translation of the entire Bible to be published in Cornish. The translator of the Cornish Bible is Professor Nicholas Williams, the foremost present-day translator into the language. The first draft of his translation was based on the original languages together with a collation of several other versions. Next the translation was reviewed by a number of competent Cornish speakers, whose comments helped improve the readability of the work. Thereafter the translator searched the Middle and Late Cornish texts—miracle plays, homilies, and portions of scripture—to find all those passages where native Cornish renderings could be used in the translation. Such passages by speakers of traditional Cornish have been incorporated throughout the Cornish Bible, and add to its authenticity. Wherever possible, personal and geographical names are those attested in traditional Cornish. The volume contains ten maps, in which all the place-names appear in Cornish form. An Beybel Sans is written in Standard Cornish.

Alicia in Terrā Mīrābilī
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Latin by Clive Harcourt Carruthers
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-69-5

Hōc in librō offertur lēctōrī nova ēditiō fābulae Alicia in Terrā Mīrābilī in Latīnum annō 1964ō ā Clive Harcourt Carruthers conversae. Differt ā prīmā ēditiōne duābus praecipuīs rēbus: cum quod discrīmen nunc servātur inter i litteram vōcālem et j litteram vim cōnsonantis habentem, tum quod omnēs vōcālēs longae sunt līneolīs superscrīptīs ōrnātae. Omnium vōcālium longitūdinēs dīligenter exquīsītae sunt, etiam in syllabīs positiōne longīs. In pauciōribus syllabīs, quārum vōcālium longitūdinēs aut nunc incertae sunt, aut manifestē etiam antīquīs temporibus vacillābant, vōcālēs sine līneolīs scrīptae sunt.

A Furst Readin Book in Ulster Scots
Bae Harriette Taylor Treadwell an Margaret Free, translatet intae Ulster Scots bae Anne Morrison-Smyth
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-68-8

This weeyins’ furst readin book, furst publisht in 1910, is intendet fur early readers, an fur them that teach them. It haes a brev wee vocabulary o jest unner 300 wurds, an presents nine classic yarns: The Wee Rid Hen, The Ginger­bried Weefla, The Oul Wumman an the Pig, The Weefla an the Goat, The Pancake, Chicken Little, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Wee Tuppens, an Wee Spider’s Furst Web.

The book contains more than ninety illustrations bae the artist Frederick Richardson.

A Concise Middle English Dictionary
By Anthony Lawson Mayhew and Walter William Skeat, revised by Michael Everson
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-23-7 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-67-1 paperback.

Although in the age of the Internet we have access to the magnificent Middle English Compendium hosted by the University of Michigan, few students of Middle English would question the usefulness of a desktop copy for day-to-day reference. There has been no handy, reliable edition of such a dictionary for many years. The 1888 edition of Mayhew and Skeat’s Concise Dictionary of Middle English can sometimes be found in antiquarian bookshops, but it is scarce, and available copies vary in both condition and cost. This new edition of Mayhew and Skeat has been revised and completely reset for the modern reader. It offers in a concise form more than 11,000 headwords with source references, cross references, and etymologies. Free online digital editions of the dictionary are now available at two major archives, and these too are useful for online searching. Some of these have been edited into legible formats; some are more or less raw ascii texts. A few “publishers” have released printed versions which are little more than dumps of those plain-text files—and I use the scare quotes advisedly here, feeling sorry for those students who have bought those editions thinking that they were, in fact, buying proper dictionaries. This edition has been set in Baskerville, a clear and accessible font, which it is hoped, will increase the legibility of the book. Further choices made in typesetting have led to additional changes in format, both for aesthetic reasons and to modernize the text in line with the contemporary reader’s expectations.

The Admiral’s Caravan
By Charles Edward Carryl
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-66-4

The Admiral’s Caravan appeared first in serialized form in the children’s periodical St Nicholas beginning in 1891; it was published in book form first in 1892 and remained in print for many years. The Admiral’s Caravan is one of the last important works of nineteenth-century American children’s fantasy published before The Wizard of Oz appeared in 1900. The story takes place—as such stories often do—on Christmas Eve when young Dorothy embarks on an adventure with the Admiral, the Highlander, and Sir Walter Rosettes, three wooden statues who come alive on that magic evening...

Davy and the Goblin
By Charles Edward Carryl
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-65-7

Davy and the Goblin appeared first in serialized form in the children’s periodical St Nicholas beginning in 1884; it was published in book form first in 1885 and remained in print for over 40 years. The book’s use of nonsense and punning places it firmly amongst those works influenced by Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland; its fast-paced, kaleidoscopic narrative gives it an American flavour which foreshadows much fantastic literature of the twentieth century.

Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Scots by Sandy Fleemin
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-64-0

This beuk sets oot the first translation o Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland intae Scots (that we aince caa’d “Inglis”). This leid haes cam doun fae Auld North­umbrian, the Auld English that wis spoken fae the Humber tae the Lothians. It’s a near relation o Staunart English, but there’s many a differ in baith grammar an vocabulary. The translator’s uised tradeetional spellins the likes o wis set doun bi Burns, Scott, Slater an many ither, tho wantin the “apologetic apostrophes” ye aft see in thae beuks. This is gaes alang wi maist writins in Scots fae the aichteenth century on, an reads fine tae modren Scots spaekers bred up tae sic tradeetions.

Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland: Tales inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland
By Florence Adèle Evans, Illustrated by Albertine Randall Wheelan
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-63-3

Published first in 1900, Florence A. Evans’ Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland is told about a young girl named Alice, whose mother’s younger sister was the famous Alice of Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland. The book, illustrated with delightful drawings by Albertine Randall Wheelan, begins with a set of vignettes exploring the exploits of a number of Wonderland characters, and continues with a series of tales told by story-book animals, some of which are reminiscent of Rudyard Kipling’s Just-So Stories.

Alice ẹhr Ẹventüürn in’t Wunnerland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Low German (Low Saxon) by Reinhard F. Hahn
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-62-6

The Low Saxon translation in this book is based on Carroll’s English original, with rare glances at the handling of names and wordplay in Antonie Zimmermann’s German translation.

To the best of my knowledge this edition presents the first translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Low Saxon (also known as Low German and by its German name Plattdeutsch). This language is a descendant of Old Saxon, one of the ancestors of English. Middle Saxon (also known as Mittelniederdeutsch “Middle Low German” in modern German parlance) served as the international lingua franca of the Hanseatic Trading League and as such influenced many language varieties along the Baltic and North Sea coasts, especially those of Scandinavia, the Baltic Countries and Northern Poland.

Alices Äventyr i Sagolandet
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Swedish by Emily Nonnen
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-61-9

This book is a new edition of the first translation into Swedish, presented for the modern reader. The third translation of Alice into any language, Emily Nonnen’s 1870 version was originally published in a spelling typical of the nineteenth century. In preparing this edition, the spelling has been modernized according to the rules of current Swedish orthography.

Eileen’s Adventures in Wordland
By Zillah K. Macdonald
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-60-2

Zillah Katherine Macdonald was born in 1885 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and is noted for her children’s books, as well as for a series of “career romances for young moderns”.

Eileen’s Adventures in Wordland is Macdonald’s first novel for children, and is a real delight for lovers of words and wordplay. Eileen’s companion “X” leads her to encounters ranging from a meeting with Blighty, a word born during the first World War, to meeting with Grandmother Indo-European, who introduces Eileen to a number of her “language children”. Embellished by Stuart Hay’s charming illustrations, this “life story of our Word friends” will appeal to readers young and old who delight in the sounds and sense of language.

Enys Tresour
By Robert Louis Stevenson, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams, with illustrations by Louis Rhead
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-59-6. ISBN 978-1-78201-50-0 (paperback)

Y feu screfys Enys Tresour gans Robert Louis Stevenson i’n bledhynyow 1880 hag 1881. Dalethys veu in Braemar in Scotlond, le may whrug y das gwil gweres dhodho gans y brevyans y honen a vêwnans in gorholyon. Gorfednys veu an novel pàn esa Stevenson in Davos rag an secùnd treveth in gwâv an vledhen 1881-1882. Enys Tresour, neb a dheuth in mes pàn o an auctour udnek bledhen warn ugans bloodh, o y kensa romans hir, ha pàn veu an lyver dyllys avell lyver, Stevenson a recêvas dredho rag an kensa prës sowena in lagasow an bobel. An whedhel-ma a dhalathas apperya in mis Hedra 1881 i’n lyver termyn Sowsnek gelwys Young Folks. I’n termyn-na Cog an Mor, bò Enys Tresour o an tîtel, saw pàn veu dyllys an novel avell lyver in mis Mê 1883, an hanow o Enys Tresour yn udnyk, ha’n hanow-na a gemeras y le in mesk tîtlys a lyvrow classyk liesgweyth cotha. Y fëdh gwelys i’n lyver-ma delinyansow bryntyn Louis Rhead, a veu dyllys rag an kensa prës i’n vledhen 1915. Nicholas Williams a drailyas an lyver-ma dhe Gernowek. Ev a drailyas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland gans Lewis Carroll dhe Gernowek ha dhe Wodhalek Wordhen kefrës.

Rollo in Emblemland
By John Kendrick Bangs and Charles Raymond Macauley
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-58-9

John Kendrick Bangs (1862–1922) was born in Yonkers, New York, and is known for his work as an author, editor, and satirist. He worked for Life, a number of Harper’s periodicals, and Puck, perhaps the foremost American humour magazine of its day.

Inspired by the fantasy of Lewis Carroll’s Alice, Bangs wrote Rollo in Emblemland together with Charles Raymond Macauley in 1902. The story tells of a young boy named Rollo who visits a strange country peopled with symbols and icons—emblems of culture like John Bull, Uncle Sam, the Owl, the Stork, Puck, Mr Punch, Father Time, Cupid, and others. Macauley’s line drawings are charming and some of the verse in the book is reminiscent of Carroll’s.

Gladys in Grammarland & Alice in Grammarland
By Audrey Mayhew Allen and by Louise Franklin Bache
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-57-2

The two tales in this book are not related to one another, though both are responses to Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland, and both are somewhat didactic in nature.

Audrey Mayhew Allen was born in 1870, and so was about 27 years of age when she wrote Gladys in Grammarland. In this story, Gladys becomes sleepy after class and finds that a Verb Fairy has taken an interest in her education.

Louise Franklin Bache wrote several plays for the Junior Red Cross News, and later published a book Health Education in an American City. The charming Alice in Grammarland was written as a play for “Better Speech Week”, 5–8 November 1923, and “American Education Week”, 18–24 November 1923, and was published in Junior Red Cross News in that month and year. In it, Carroll’s Alice returns to meet her old friends the Hatter and the White Rabbit, together with the King and Queen of Grammarland.

Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream
By John Kendrick Bangs
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-56-5

John Kendrick Bangs (1862–1922) was born in Yonkers, New York, and is known for his work as an author, editor, and satirist. He worked for Life, a number of Harper’s periodicals, and Puck, perhaps the foremost American humour magazine of its day. In Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream—first published in 1907—Bangs makes light of a range of economic issues familiar to his readers—these are quite topical and all-too familiar to today’s reader as well. High taxes, corporate greed, bribery, institutional corruption, and govern mental incompetence are amongst the themes of the book.

Bangs’ Alice in Blunderland relies more on absurdity than it does on nonsense, and some of the humour is indeed rather American. But Bangs’ success is to make his reader smile wryly rather than laugh out loud—for his satire is very much on target.

Le Avventure di Alice nel Paese delle Meraviglie
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Italian by Teodorico Pietrocòla Rossetti
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-55-8

This edition presents the first translation into Italian of 1872 for the modern reader. The translation by Teodorico Pietrocòla Rossetti, whom Carroll describes as “my Italian friend”, was the fourth translation of Alice, made after the French, German, and Swedish translations. A fair number of changes have been made to the text, in order to make the book a bit more accessible to the modern reader. The intent, basically, was to retain the feel of the nineteenth-century translation while removing impediments to its enjoyment.

The Westminster Alice: A political parody based on Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland
By Hector Hugh Munro (Saki)
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-54-1

Saki was the pen-name of Hector Hugh Munro (1870–1916). He was an author and playwright best known for his subtle and witty short stories. He wrote for periodicals such as the Westminster Gazette, the Daily Express, the Bystander, the Morning Post, and the Outlook. The Westminster Alice vignettes were collected together and published in Westminster Popular No. 18 in 1902

Charles Geake (1867–1919) was, from 1892 to 1918, the head of the Liberal Publication Department, which had been established in 1887 by the National Liberal Federation (a union of all English and Welsh (but not Scottish) Liberal Associations), and the Liberal Central Association (an organization which had been founded in 1874 to facilitate Liberal Party communication throughout United Kingdom). Francis Carruthers Gould (1844–1925) was a political cartoonist and caricaturist who contributed to the Pall Mall Gazette until he joined the Westminster Gazette when it was founded. He later became an assistant editor for that publication. In addition to illustrating Saki’s Westminster Alice in a series of publications from 1900 to 1902, Gould also illustrated Charles Geake’s parody John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland, published in 1904.

New Adventures of Alice
By John Rae
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-53-4

John Rae was an American author and illustrator who lived from 1882 to 1963. He wrote and illustrated New Adventures of Alice, Grasshopper Green and The Meadow Mice, and Granny Goose, and was noted for his portraits of Carl Sandburg and Albert Einstein. This charming book, written in 1917, fulfils Rae’s own wish that Carroll had written another book about Wonderland. In it Alice’s new adventures consist of visits to a number of Mother Goose characters, as well as to a remarkable artist, a poet, and a printer—characters certainly familiar to John Rae himself.

Les Aventures d’Alice au pays des merveilles
By Lewis Carroll, translated into French by Henri Bué
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-52-7

This edition presents the first translation into French of 1869 for the modern reader. The translation by Henri Bué was the second translation of Alice into any language. Bué consulted with Lewis Carroll on the translation, which was described as “authorized”.

John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland
By Charles Geake and Francis Carruthers Gould
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-51-0

John Bull is the personification of Great Britain (or at least of England). He was first created in 1712 by John Arbuthnot, and eventually became a common sight in British editorial cartoons of the 19th and early 20th centuries. John is a sort of British Everyman, endowed with common sense and good intentions, who likes a pint of beer. In his trip to the Fiscal Wonder land, John’s frustrations with the bewildering nonsensicality of economic politics are made apparent by the author and illustrator.

More than a century on, it is not always easy to identify the people caricatured by Gould. Still more arduous would be to attempt to explain the jokes and allusions by made by Geake—that would be material for an academic thesis. Nevertheless I can supply a few biographical summaries and photos to assist the reader to put the cartoon parodies into context and guide the reader who wishes to pursue an interest in any of these characters, or in the particulars of Tariff Reform, Free Trade, the Free Food League, etc.

Lost in Blunderland: The further adventures of Clara: A political parody based on Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland
By Caroline Lewis (Edward Harold Begbie, J. Stafford Ransome, and M. H. Temple)
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-50-3

Clara in Blunderland was written in 1902 and details the adventures of Arthur Balfour while being groomed to become Prime Minister—the Clara of Lost in Blunderland, published in 1903, is Balfour once he got the job. The two novels deal with British frustration and anger about the Boer War and with Britain’s political leadership at the time.

Caroline Lewis’ jokes and allusions are too rich and densely woven into this book to explain them all—more a theme for an academic thesis than for a foreword like this, and I am no expert in any case. But I can supply a few biographical summaries (to 1903) and photos to assist the reader to put the cartoon parodies into context, and guide the reader who wishes to pursue an interest in any of these characters, or in the particulars of Balfour’s early premiership.

Clara in Blunderland: A political parody based on Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland
By Caroline Lewis (Edward Harold Begbie, J. Stafford Ransome, and M. H. Temple)
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-49-7

Caroline Lewis is a pen-name, that of the team of Edward Harold Begbie (1871–1929), J. Stafford Ransome (born 1860), and M. H. Temple, who wrote both Clara in Blunderland and a sequel, Lost in Blunderland. These two novels deal with British frustration and anger about the Boer War and with Britain’s political leadership at the time. Much of Begbie’s work was as a journalist, though he also wrote non-fiction, biographies, and some twenty-five novels, ranging from children’s stories to explorations of personal psychology and spirituality. In 1917, he publicly agreed with the pacifists in their opposition to the war and defended the right conscientious objectors not to fight in it. Later he wrote some of his best-known investigative and satirical work under the pen-name “A Gentleman with a Duster”.

In the end, in 2010, Clara in Blunderland has to stand on its own in a way that it didn’t in 1902. In my opinion it survives the passage of a century surprisingly well. Politics and politicians haven’t changed much, it seems, in a century. That may be regrettable—but at least Caroline Lewis can still make us laugh about it!

Contoyrtyssyn Ealish ayns Çheer ny Yindyssyn
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Manx by Brian Stowell
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-48-0

This is the third edition of Brian Stowell’s translation into Manx. The first appeared in 1990; the second in 2006 under the title Ealish ayns Çheer ny Yindyssyn, with illustrations by Eric Kineald. The text of the present edition differs very slightly from the previous editions. In places, italics and exclamation marks have been restored where Carroll used them for emphasis in his original text.

Whedhlow Kernowek: Stories in Cornish
By A. S. D. Smith (Caradar)
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-47-3

Heb dowt vÿth yth o Caradar (A. S. D. Smith, 1883–1950) an gwella scrifor a Gernowek a dhedhyow avarr an dasserghyans. Y fÿdh kefys i’n lyver-ma try rew a whedhlow dhyworth y bluven ev hag a veu gwelys rag an kensa prÿs lies bledhen alebma. An kensa bagas a whedhlow yw kemerys in mes a’y gùntellyans Nebes Whedhlow Ber (1948); yma an secùnd rew a whedhlow kemerys dhyworth y lyver Whethlow an Seyth Den Fur a Rom (1948), ha’n tressa bagas a whedhlow a veu gwelys in dadn an tîtel “Forth an Broder Odryk” in Kemysk Kernewek: A Cornish Miscellany (1964). Yma kefys i’n lyver-ma kefrÿs gerva usy moy ès 1,400 ger ha hanow styrys inhy.

Anturiaethau Alys yng Ngwlad Hud
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Welsh by Selyf Roberts
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-46-6

Selyf Roberts produced an abridged and rather formal translation in 1953 which nearly thirty years later in 1982 he felt needed to be replaced by a full-length fresh translation in a somewhat more natural style. This is a new edition of Selyf Roberts’ 1982 Welsh translation, freshly typeset and containing John Tenniel’s illustrations. In preparing this edition, minor alterations have been made to the spelling and syntax to conform with current Welsh practice.

Alice’s Abenteuer im Wunderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into German by Antonie Zimmermann
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-45-9

This edition presents the first translation into German of 1869 for the modern reader. The translation by Antonie Zimmermann was, in fact, the first translation of Alice into any language. It was originally published in a Fraktur typeface, and was written in a spelling typical of the nineteenth century. In preparing this edition, the spelling has been modernized with care and according to the rules of proven German orthography.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Retold in words of one syllable
By Lewis Carroll, retold by Mrs J. C. Gorham
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-44-2

Mrs J. C. Gorham, alas, is known to us only by her married name—and this means, by the usual practice of the time, that her husband was named J. C. Nevertheless, Mrs Gorham is notable for having written three books in “Burt’s Series of One Syllable Books”, Gulliver’s Travels (1896) and Black Beauty (1905) being her other two, with some eleven other books in this “series of Classics, selected specially for young people’s reading, and told in simple language for youngest readers.

Retelling in words of one syllable is indeed a “clever game” and I dare say it isn’t easy to do—not convincingly, anyway. Mrs Gorham achieved it: her retelling in simple language for younger and early readers is still worth reading today.

What thou wilt: Traditional and Innovative trends in Post-Gardnerian Witchcraft
By Jon Hanna
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-43-5

The publication from 1954 of Gerald Gardner’s non-fiction works on witchcraft has led to the current public existence of two different trends of religious and magical belief and practice, both which identify themselves as Wicca. One form places a strong emphasis upon the transmission of traditional practices and a form of initiatory lineage similar to that practised by Gardner himself. The other covers a wider range of views on each of these aspects, but with the most common position being a strong distance between the traditional practices—giving a greater importance to innovation—and a complete or near-complete abandon ment of the concept of initiatory lineage. This book examines the differences and offers insights into both.

The Nursery “Alice”
By Lewis Carroll
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-42-8

The Nursery “Alice” is intended for pre-school children “aged from Nought to Five”. Running to just under 7,000 words, it is considerably shorter than both Alice’s Adventures under Ground (15,500 words) and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (27,500 words). Much of the narrative consists of the author’s addressing the young listener, explaining the story by reference to the illustrations. The effect is rather charming, particularly where Carroll pokes fun at features in Tenniel’s illustrations. These were quite skilfully and attractively coloured. Interestingly, Tenniel coloured Alice’s dress yellow with a blue trim and white apron, whereas nowadays most artists colour the dress in blue and white only.

The Cult of Relics: Devocyon dhe Greryow
By Alan M. Kent, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2010. ISBN 78-1-904808-41-1 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-79-4 paperback.

The Cult of Relics is a new novel by Alan M. Kent (author of Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! and Electric Pastyland), presented in a bilingual format, with a Cornish-language translation, Devocyon dhe Greryow, by Nicholas Williams. The story is set in Western Britain in the mid-1990s just after the Gulf War, and tells of three extraordinary people: of the New-Age Traveller Jude Fox, of the American photojournalist Eddie Hopkins, and of the Cornish-born archaeologist Robert Bolitho.

The Cult of Relics yw novel nowyth dhyworth Alan M. Kent (auctour a Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! hag a Electric Pastyland), hag yma va dyllys gans trailyans Kernowek Nicholas Williams, Devoycyon dhe Greryow. An whedhel-ma a gebmer le i’n West a Vreten Veur in cres an bledhydnyow mil, naw cans, peswar ugans ha deg, termyn cot warlergh Bresel an Morbleg. Yth eson ny ow metya ino gans try ferson, meur a les: Jûd Fox, Viajyores a’n Oos Nowyth; Eddie Hopkins, an fôtojornalyst Amerycan; ha’n hendhyscansyth dhia Gernow, Robert Bolitho.

Nautilus: A sequel to Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas and The Mysterious Island
By Craig Weatherhill
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-40-4

1883: On a doomed volcanic island in the southern Pacific, a group of American castaways commit the body of an enigmatic genius to the deep, along with the secrets of an extraordinary life…

2014: The Deep Watch environmental ship Aurora mysteriously sinks with all hands in remote Antarctic waters and a subsequent oceanic sequence of strange sightings, antique gold bars and damaged ships blazes a trail around the world. Separate investigations by journalist Barrington Hobbes and Naval Intelligence officer Donall Lindsay lead both towards extreme danger on land and sea, a worldwide ecological conspiracy … and an avenging legend!

Alice’s Adventures under Ground
By Lewis Carrolll
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-39-8

On 26 November 1864, Dodgson gave Alice the handwritten manuscript of Alice’s Adventures under Ground, illustrated by Dodgson himself. At Christmas 1886 a facsimile edition of the manuscript was published. Several further facsimile editions have since appeared, and in them all, Dodgson’s careful handwriting can be seen.

This edition sets the text in type, thus making it easier to read than in facsimile. It is certainly well worth reading, although it is shorter than the final form of the story—Alice’s Adventures under Ground is just over 15,500 words in length, whereas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is nearly twice as long, containing about 27,500 words. Since this is a typeset edition, capital letters are used regularly at the beginning of quoted speech even though they are often omitted in the manuscript; some other punctuation has been normalized. Many of these changes are also found in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There
By Lewis Carroll
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-38-2

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a tale of summer which Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) published for the first time in July 1865. Many of the characters in the book belong to a pack of cards. This story is a winter’s tale, which Carroll first published in December 1871. Much of this second story is based on the game of chess.

The heroine of the two books is Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Dodgson taught mathematics. Although Alice Liddell was born in 1852, twenty years later then Dodgson, she is kept in the two books as a little girl of seven years of age, the age she was when she Dodgson met her for the first time. It is clear from the pieces of poetry at the beginning and the end of this book that Carroll was very fond of Alice Liddell. One must remember, however, that Alice’s parents and Carroll fell out in 1864 and that he saw her very rarely after that date.

Henry Jenner’s Handbook of the Cornish Language
Revised by Michael Everson
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-37-4

This new edition of Jenner’s classic Handbook of the Cornish Language appears more than a century after the book’s first publication. Now that the Cornish Revival has weathered many storms, it is well worth making Jenner’s ground-breaking work available again, copies of the 1904 edition having become rare and expensive.

This re-edition is not a mere facsimile. I have added phonetic transcriptions in the IPA, to assist the modern reader in under­standing exactly which sounds Jenner was recommending. (Two characters used here, [ᵻ] and [ᵿ], are not used in the IPA proper; the Oxford English Dictionary uses them for reduced [ɪ] (schwi) and reduced [ʊ] (schwu). See Note 31 on page 52.) Jenner’s Cornish spellings have been kept as he wrote them, except where a typographical error or omission had rendered his intention obscure. Breton spellings, however, have been updated to modern orthography.

The Hunting of the Snark
By Lewis Carroll
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-36-7

The Hunting of the Snark was first published in 1876, eleven years after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and four years after Through the Looking-Glass. It is a master piece of nonsense and is connected to Through the Looking-Glass by its use of vocabulary from the poem “Jabberwocky”.

The Hunting of the Snark is a strangely dark poem, and some critics believe that its themes—insanity and death—are rather too adult in nature for children’s literature. We know, nonetheless, that Lewis Carroll intended the poem to be enjoyed by children: he dedicated the book in acrostic verse to his young friend Gertrude Chataway, and signed some 80 presentation copies to other young readers. Many of those inscriptions were in the form of an acrostic based upon the name of the child to whom the book was presented.

A New Alice in the Old Wonderland
By Anna Matlack Richards
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-35-0

First published in 1895 in Philadelphia, thirty years after the initial publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Anna Matlack Richards’ A New Alice in the Old Wonderland is a splendid and worthy successor to Lewis Carroll’s original tales. Instead of Alice Liddell, it is Alice Lee who makes her way to Wonderland...

Richly illustrated in the style of John Tenniel by the author’s daughter, this book will delight any reader thirsting for a new adventure in Carroll’s wondrous world.

Wonderland Revisited and the Games Alice Played There
By Keith Sheppard
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-34-3

Did Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass leave you yearning for more? Join Alice on her new journey and meet the extraordinary inhabitants of Wonderland, both familiar and new. If your bed turned into a boat and you found yourself “drifting off” in an entirely unexpected manner how would you find your way home? The Jack of Diamonds says it’s Alice’s own fault for being fast asleep—had she slept more slowly she wouldn’t be so far from home. The Red Queen, the Mah-jong Dragons, even the Red King’s Gamekeeper, all seem helpful enough at first—but things never quite turn out the way Alice hopes!

Brimming with wordplay, nonsense verse, and a cast of eccentric characters each with their own peculiar logic, this adventure is faithful to the style of the originals, picking up the pen where Lewis Carroll put it down. Be swept away on a torrent of humour and madness. Alice is back!

Treasure Island
By Robert Louis Stevenson, with illustrations by Louis Rhead
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-33-6, ISBN 978-1-782010-53-1 (paperback)

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos in the winter of 1881–1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915. The Cornish translation is by Nicholas Williams, who also translated Louis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Cornish and into Irish.

Skeul an Tavas: A coursebook in Standard Cornish
By Ray Chubb, edited by Michael Everson and Nicholas Williams
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-32-9 OUT OF PRINT

Skeul an Tavas is a coursebook by Ray Chubb designed to meet the needs of those learning under the structure of the Languages Ladder programme of the UK Department for Children, Schools and Families. Unlike some other coursebooks, this book teaches Cornish in a “can-do” way, and does not expect students to know the finer points of Cornish grammar from the beginning. The course starts with the basics—all presented in a friendly and accessible way.

This book is aimed at the Breakthrough level of the Languages Ladder. This consists of three stages and Skeul an Tavas is divided into three parts, each corresponding to one of those stages. The book is intended for internal teacher assessment in the stages leading to Breakthrough, but the whole syllabus required by a student to take the external assessment at Breakthrough level is covered in this book.

Sciorrfhocail: Scéal agus úrscéal
By Panu Petteri Höglund, with illustrations by Otso Höglund
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-31-2

Trí ghearrscéal agus úrscéal amháin le scríbhneoir Fionlannach a d’fhoghlaim a chuid Gaeilge ó scéalaithe agus ó scríbhneoirí móra na Gaeltachta sular tháinig sé go hÉirinn den chéad uair. Seo iad na scéalta Gaeilge a chum sé ina fhear óg dó, agus iad ar fáil faoi chlúdach leabhair anois. Scéalta iad faoi dhaoine uaigneacha a chaitheann slabhraí an uaignis díobh agus iad ag tóraíocht an ghrá.

Jowal Lethesow: Whedhel a’n West a Gernow
By Craig Weatherhill, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-30-5

Termyn pòr hir alebma pow Lethesow inter Pedn an Wlas ha Syllan a wrug sedhy rag nefra in dadn an todnow. Ny dhienkys marnas Arlùth Trevelyan. Lies bledhen awosa yma whedhel coth an pow kellys ow tewheles dhe dropla Peny ha Jowan, whor ha broder, neb yw skydnys dhyworth Arlùth Trevelyan y honen. Destnys yns dhe gollenwel profecy coth, hag y degys aberth in gwlascor gudh a’n West a Gernow. Ena y a vÿdh maglednys i’n whilas auncyent rag power hag anvarwoleth. “Wàr an tu aral a’n park, dhyrag an magoryow overdevys, a sevy seyth marhak; linen gasadow a skeusow cosel. Tewl o aga mergh, tewl aga mentylly hir, ha down o an cùgollow ow keles aga fysmant.” Yma Arlùth Pengersek ow cresy y hyll ev spedya dre weres an drognerthow-ma. Saw kynth usy an whedhlow coth ow tasvewa, yma Peny ha Jowan Trevelyan a’ga sav intredho ev ha... Jowal Lethesow.

Lastall den Scáthán agus a bhFuair Eilís Ann Roimpi
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Irish by Nicholas Williams
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-29-9

Scéal samhraidh atá in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland a d’fhoilsigh Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) den chéad uair i mí Iúil 1865. D’fhoilsigh Nicholas Williams leagan Gaeilge de sin sa bhliain 2003 faoin teideal Eachtraí Eilíse i dTír na nIontas. Is le paca cártaí a bhaineann roinnt mhaith de charachtair agus d’eachtraí an leabhair. Scéal geimhridh is ea an scéal seo Lastall den Scáthán agus a bhFuair Eilís Ann Roimpi agus is aistriúchán Gaeilge é ar Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There a d’fhoilsigh Carroll den chéad uair i mí na Nollag 1871. Ar chluiche fichille a bunaíodh formhór dá bhfuil sa dara scéal seo.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas
By Jules Verne, translated by F. P. Walter
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-28-2

For many, this book has been a source of fascination, surely one of the most influential novels ever written, an inspiration for such scientists and discoverers as engineer Simon Lake, oceanographer William Beebe, polar traveler Sir Ernest Shackleton. Likewise Dr Robert D. Ballard, finder of the sunken Titanic, confesses that this was his favourite book as a teenager, and Cousteau himself, most renowned of marine explorers, called it his shipboard bible. The present translation is a faithful yet communicative rendering of the original French texts published in Paris by J. Hetzel et Cie.—the hardcover first edition issued in the autumn of 1871, collated with the softcover editions of the First and Second Parts issued separately in the autumn of 1869 and the summer of 1870. Although prior English versions have often been heavily abridged, this new translation is complete to the smallest substantive detail.

Lyver Pejadow rag Kenyver Jorna: Cornish Daily Prayer
By Andy Phillips, with translations into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-27-5

his book has been compiled with two aims—to help you to learn Cornish, and to bring you closer to God in the process. Morning and Evening Prayer in this book follow a traditional format, and ancient prayers from the Celtic Church have been included whenever possible. A fixed psalm for Morning and Evening Prayer is used each day to make things simple, because that’s how prayer should be. Collects have been included for use during the Church year, as well as a list of Celtic saints’ days.

Yma dew dowl gans an lyver-ma—gul gweres dhe dus ow tesky Kernowek ha’ga dry nessa dhe Dhuw kefrÿs. Yma Pejadow Myttyn ha Pejadow Gordhuwher i’n lyver-ma ow sewya an ordyr tradycyonal, hag y feu formys a bejadow coth dhia an Eglos Keltek gorrys aberveth pan o hedna possybyl. Udn salm yn udnek re beu appoyntys rag pùb dëdh a’n seythen, may fe taclow sempel— rag gwell yw an pejadow mars yw sempel. Yma Collectys dhe ûsya dre vledhen an Eglos i’n lyver inwedh, ha rol a dhegolyow nebes sens Keltek.

The Primer
By Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-26-8

This primer, first published in 1910, is intended for early readers, and for those who teach them. It has a relatively small vocabulary of just over 200 words, and presents nine classic stories: The Little Red Hen, The Ginger bread Boy, The Old Woman and the Pig, The Boy and the Goat, The Pancake, Chicken Little, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Little Tuppens, and Little Spider’s First Web.

Getting Your Goat: The Gourmet Guide
By Patricia A. Moore with Jill Charlotte Stanford
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-25-1

Goats have been a major source of food since time immemorial. Ancient cave paintings show the hunting of goats. They are also one of the oldest domesticated animals on earth. Goat meat can be stewed, curried, baked, grilled, barbecued, minced, canned, or made into sausage. Goat milk and the cheese made from it has remained popular throughout history and still is consumed on a more extensive basis worldwide than cow’s milk.

In addition to food, goats provided early man with skins to make into clothing, with hair to spin into yarn and weave into cloth, and were then—as they are now—a symbol of wealth. To own many goats meant you were well-off and would never face starvation.

This book contains recipes from all over the world. They are easy, many of them quick to prepare, and all are absolutely delicious.

Kensa Lyver Redya
By Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free, translated into Cornish by Eddie Foirbeis Climo
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-24-4

Yma an kensa lyver redya-ma têwlys rag an descor avar, be va flogh bò den leundevys. Nyns eus lies ger dyvers i’n lyver, nebes moy ès 200 warbarth. Y fÿdh kefys ino naw whedhel classyk: An Yar Vian Rudh, An Maw a Vara Jynjyber, An Venyn Goth ha’n Porhel, An Maw ha’n Avar, An Grampethen, Ÿdhnyk Lÿdhnyk, An Try Bogh Bewek, Trednar Bian, ha Kensa Gwias an Gefnysen Vian.

Yma an lyver screfys i’n spellyans gelwys Kernowek Standard. I’n lyver Kernowek-ma y fÿdh gwelys moy es deg war peswar ugans a’n delinyansow gwrÿs gans an artyst Frederick Richardson.

A Concise Middle English Dictionary
By Anthony Lawson Mayhew and Walter William Skeat, revised by Michael Everson
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-23-7 hardcover. ISBN 978-1-904808-67-1 paperback.

Although in the age of the Internet we have access to the magnificent Middle English Compendium hosted by the University of Michigan, few students of Middle English would question the usefulness of a desktop copy for day-to-day reference. There has been no handy, reliable edition of such a dictionary for many years. The 1888 edition of Mayhew and Skeat’s Concise Dictionary of Middle English can sometimes be found in antiquarian bookshops, but it is scarce, and available copies vary in both condition and cost. This new edition of Mayhew and Skeat has been revised and completely reset for the modern reader. It offers in a concise form more than 11,000 headwords with source references, cross references, and etymologies. Free online digital editions of the dictionary are now available at two major archives, and these too are useful for online searching. Some of these have been edited into legible formats; some are more or less raw ascii texts. A few “publishers” have released printed versions which are little more than dumps of those plain-text files—and I use the scare quotes advisedly here, feeling sorry for those students who have bought those editions thinking that they were, in fact, buying proper dictionaries. This edition has been set in Baskerville, a clear and accessible font, which it is hoped, will increase the legibility of the book. Further choices made in typesetting have led to additional changes in format, both for aesthetic reasons and to modernize the text in line with the contemporary reader’s expectations.

A Concise Dictionary of Cornish Place-Names
By Craig Weatherhill
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-22-0

The key to understanding the meaning of Cornish place-names is language. Most derive from the Cornish language primarily, but many of them have their roots in Old English, Middle English, French, and other languages which have left their mark on Cornwall. Through the tireless and exacting work of place-name specialists, the secrets of Cornish place-names are being unlocked for everyone. This dictionary offers in a concise format more than 3,300 place-names. The recommendations in this dictionary preserve the authentic and attested linguistic forms while at the same time honouring the traditional orthographic forms which have been visible on the Cornish landscape for at least four centuries.

Adro dhe’n Bÿs in Peswar Ugans Dëdh
By Jules Verne, abridged and translated into Cornish by Kaspar Hocking
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-21-3

Genys veu Kaspar Hocking, trailyer an lyver-ma, in Loundres in mis Genver 1913, le mayth esa ober dh’y sîra i’n Amyralta, wosa gasa Arwennek in dyweth an ugansves cansvledhen. Kaspar a studhyas biologyeth in Coljy Imperyal, Loundres, hag a lavuryas dres deg bledhen warn ugans avell entomologyth in Ëst-Africa (Tanganyika, Ûganda, ha Kenya). Ev a omdennas dhe Bolwhevrer in 1969. An tavas Kernowek yw a les dhodho dhyworth an vledhen 1989, pàn inias y vergh, Vanessa Beeman, warnodho dos gensy dhe glassys i’n tavas. Kaspar yw esel inwedh a Drest Bêwnans Gwyls Kernow ha re beu Caderyer an Consel, ha wosa henna, Lewyth an trest. Ev o Caderyer Agan Tavas dhia 1996 dhe 1998.

La Aventuroj de Alicio en Mirlando
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Esperanto by Elfric Leofwin Kearney
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-20-6

La libro Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland estas trezoro de la angla porinfana literaturo kaj estis unue eldonita en 1865. La libro estas tradukita en multajn lingvojn. Ĉi tiu traduko en Esperanton de Elfric Leofwine Kearney estis unue eldonita en 1910. Ĉi tiu nova eldono enhavas la famajn ilustraĵojn de Sir John Tenniel, kiuj unue aperis en la originala angla eldono.

Lewis Carroll estas pseŭdonimo: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson estis la vera nomo de la aŭtoro, kaj li estis lekciisto pri Matematiko en Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson komencis la rakonton je la 4a de Julio en la jaro 1862, dum remboata vojaĝo sur la rivero Tamizo en Oxford kune kun la Reverend Robinson Duckworth, Alice Liddell (dek jaraĝa filino de la Dean de Christ Church) kaj ŝiaj du fratinoj, Lorina (dek tri jaraĝa) kaj Edith (ok jaraĝa). Estas ankaŭ klara laŭ la poemo ĉe la komenco de la libro, ke la knabinoj petis rakonton de Dodgson, kaj kontraŭvole li komencis diri al ili la unuan version de la rakonto. Multaj duonkaŝitaj referencoj pri la kvinopo troviĝas en la libro, fine eldonita en 1865.

Alys in Pow an Anethow
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2009. ISBN 978-1-904808-19-0

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, jowal bian a lien an flehes, a veu dyllys rag an kensa prës in 1865. Trailyansow dhe lies tavas re apperyas dhia an vledhen-na. Yma an lyver-ma screfys i’n spellyans aswonys avell Kernowek Standard. Pòr ogas yw an lytherednans-na dhe’n Furv Scrifys Savonek (Grafow Hengovek), saw nebes fowtys bian i’n Furv Scrifys Savonek re beu amendys in spellyans an lyver-ma, hag y fëdh sinys diacrytek ûsys i’n spellyans kefrës dhe dhysqwedhes dyffransow inter geryow kehaval bò dhe notya vogalednow a yll bos leverys in dyw fordh dhyvers. Pynag oll a allo redya an Furv Scrifys Savonek, a vëdh abyl dhe redya an versyon-ma heb caletter vëth oll. Pan dheuth an kensa dyllans in mes a Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, yth feu gwelys inho delinyansow tednys gans John Tenniel. Yma telinyansow Tenniel i’n trailyans-ma kefrës.

The Torah: Jewish and Samaritan versions compared
Arranged by Mark Shoulson
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-18-3

The Samaritans share an origin with Jews, but the two peoples diverged thousands of years ago, already in Biblical times. The main schism between the cultures is the location of the Holy Temple, the “place the LORD your God will choose as a dwelling for his Name.” To the Jews, this meant Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. The Samaritans looked to God’s designation as a place of holiness and sacrifice in the book of Deuteronomy (11:29), and understood the designated site to be Mount Gerizim in Samaria, near the city of Shechem. There they continue to worship, and there even to this day they sacrifice the Passover offering every year.

The Samaritans consider only the Pentateuch to be a holy book; the rest of the Hebrew Scriptures are no more a part of the Samaritan Bible than the Christian New Testament is a part of the Jewish Bible. The Samaritan version of the Torah differs in several ways from the Jewish Masoretic version, and those differences are the purpose of this book. Both texts are given, in modern Square Hebrew script, on facing pages. Minor variations are printed in boldface type slightly larger than the ordinary text. Major variations are also printed in boldface type but even larger still than the minor variations.

George Fox: A Christian Mystic
By Hugh McGregor Ross
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-17-6

A mystic is one who has had the experience that the divine Ultimate and the essence of the individual Self are fundamentally one and the same. In his maturity George Fox dictated a vivid account of his profound mystical experience, which transformed him from an unhappy questing youth into a charismatic spiritual giant. Unlike some other mystics he resolved to share his experience with others. This became his life’s work, and resulted in establishing the community known today as the Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers. He did this by travelling widely, addressing crowds, and by an amazing output of documents. Hugh McGregor Ross made an intensive study of these documents in the majestic Quaker Library in London. He there identified that Fox’s record of his spiritual awakening, which involved what in the seventeenth century was regarded as a blasphemy, had been tampered with. Here it is restored to its original form. It is followed by a great number of the documents Fox created to guide and support his followers, all given in his own words but edited sensitively for the modern reader. This is a unique record of the awakening of a mystic in the Christian tradition, and of living out that experience in his way of life.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
By Lewis Carroll
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-16-9

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the beginning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. There are many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

Cuairt na Cruinne in Ochtó Lá
By Jules Verne, translated into Irish by Torna (Tadhg Ua Donnchadha), edited by Nicholas Williams
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-15-2

Chuir Tadhg Ó Donnchadha Gaeilge ar Le tour du monde en quatre vingt jours le Jules Verne go luath i bhfichidí na fichiú haoise, bíodh nár foilsíodh an t-aistriúchán Gaeilge i bhfoirm leabhar go dtí 1938 agus Cuaird an Domhain i gCeithre Fichid Lá mar theideal air. Is sa chló Gaelach agus i seanlitriú a bhí eagrán 1938. Bhuail mise an cló Rómhánach agus an litriú caighdeánach anuas ar leagan Thorna chun é a chur in oiriúint do léitheoirí an lae inniu. Bhí orm freisin roinnt de na logainmneacha atá ag an aistritheoir a choigeartú sa chaoi go dtuigfeadh an léitheoir nua-aimseartha iad. Ar mhaithe leis an soiléire, d’athraigh mé stór focal Thorna i bhfíorchorráit freisin. Cé go bhfuil an teicneolaíocht atá mar bhonn le taisteal Philéas Fogg timpeall an domhain sa leabhar as dáta le fada an lá, ní rachaidh téama an úrscéil, an geall a leagadh agus an rás in aghaidh na haimsire, as dáta go deo, agus tá súil agam go mbainfidh an gnáthléitheoir taitneamh as an eagrán nua seo. —Nicholas Williams.

Going it alone: Advice, comments, and sympathy for women over 50 who find themselves alone
By Jill Charlotte Stanford
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-14-5

Jill Charlotte Stanford takes the devastating emotional subject of a woman finding herself alone over the age of 50—whether through death or from divorce—and offers her reader a bouquet of helpful advice, sympathy, and common sense laced with humor. Going It Alone is a gift to women over 50 who find themselves alone.

Eachtraí Eilíse i dTír na nIontas
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Irish by Nicholas Williams
2007. ISBN 978-1-904808-13-8

Is seoid de litríocht na bpáistí an leabhar Béarla Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland a foilsíodh den chéad uair sa bhliain 1865. Is iomaí sin teanga a bhfuil aistriúchán den scéal le fáil inti. Foilsíodh aistriúchán Gaeilge le Pádraig Ó Cadhla (1875-1948) sa bhliain 1922 ach ní fhacthas leagan ar bith eile i nGaeilge go dtí anois. Is aistriúchán nua ar fad an leagan seo thíos. K. Verschoyle a rinne na léaráidí le haghaidh aistriúchán Uí Chadhla. Is iad na pictiúir cháiliúla a rinne Sir John Tenniel agus a bhí sa chéad eagrán Béarla atá le feiceáil sa leabhar seo.

Thirty Essays on the Gospel of Thomas
By Hugh McGregor Ross
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-12-1

These thirty Essays are independent of each other yet are all related to or derived from a study of the Gospel of Thomas. Thus they look at it from different points of view. They are the result of considering every possible aspect of the Gospel and its origin. The study focused on the Gospel itself, without being influenced by other ideas about the purpose and nature of Jesus’ mission.

The early Essays in the book relate to matter-of-fact features of the Gospel and how it came into existence and survived. Later Essays move on to expound crucial spiritual Teachings of Jesus. They make many references to the sayings in the Gospel and show how they link together into a woven whole. The set of Essays are of inestimable value in providing an understanding of the Gospel of Thomas.

Breton Grammar
By Roparz Hemon, translated, adapted, and revised by Michael Everson
2007. Second edition ISBN 978-1-904808-11-4. OUT OF PRINT.

The first English-language edition of this Breton Grammar was published in 1995. The book is for the most part a straight forward translation of the ninth edition of Roparz Hemon’s Grammaire bretonne. In preparing the translation, a number of sections in the grammar were changed for the benefit of the English-speaking reader. Many, but not all, of these additions may be found in the notes to the various sections.

Much of the section on the pronunciation of Breton, especially the phonology, has been revised in response to the needs of the English-speaking reader. In restructuring the detailed analysis of Breton phonology, particularly that of the vowel system, synthesis has been made of the best of Jackson (1967), Kervella (1976) Trépos (1980), Favereau (1992); Lagadeg and Menard (1995) has been indispensible. For the difficult question of the consonants, see the Note to §219. The International Phonetic Alphabet is used quite strictly throughout this book. As this is a teaching as well as a reference grammar, the spirit of Hemon’s remarks in §§206–09 has been followed in standardizing the description and transcriptions. It is hoped that the reader first learning Breton will be served by such standardization in preparation for encountering real Breton dialects.

Form and Content in Revived Cornish: Articles in criticism of Kernowek Kemyn
By Michael Everson, Craig Weatherhill, Ray Chubb, Bernard Deacon, and Nicholas Williams
2007. Reprinted with corrections 2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-10-7

Kernowek Kemyn, a form of spelling currently promoted by the Cornish Language Board, has been subject to sustained criticism for nearly two decades since its inception. The form and content of the Cornish Language Board’s publications continue to invite criticism and have inspired this volume. The essays begin with Michael Everson’s review of recent Cornish Language Board typography, including the second edition of Ken George’s Gerlyver Kres, the New Testament in Kernowek Kemyn, George’s Gerlyvrik, and the recent and controversial “preliminary edition” of Bywnans Ke. This is followed by a reprint of Everson’s review of the first edition of George’s Gerlyver Kres, since reference is made to it in the first article. Craig Weatherhill, Cornwall’s foremost expert on place-names, provides the next two articles, both reviews of Cornish Language Board publications, Place-Names in Cornwall and The Formation of Cornish Place-Names. Ray Chubb and Craig Weatherhill collaborated on a short paper in which they provide an analysis of the similarity of Revived Cornish orthographic forms to traditional spellings of Cornish place-names. Bernard Deacon provides two insightful articles, the first on the values expressed in Kernowek Kemyn rhetoric, and the second on the aims and methods of the Cornish Language Board. Finally, Nicholas Williams reviews An Testament Nowydh edited by Keith Syed and published by the Cornish Language Board.

Towards Authentic Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2006. Reprinted with corrections 2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-09-1

Towards Authentic Cornish is in the first place a rebuttal of the defence of Kernowek Kemyn attempted by Paul Dunbar and Ken George in Kernewek Kemmyn: Cornish for the Twenty-First Century. In the present work, Professor Williams demonstrates with examples from the Cornish texts just how unconvincing is George’s defence of Kernowek Kemyn. The latter portions of the book offer a detailed critique of George’s Gerlyver Kernewek Kemmyn and of Wella Brown’s Grammar of Modern Cornish.

Writings on Revived Cornish
By Nicholas Williams
2006. Reprinted with corrections 2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-08-4

This book brings together in one convenient volume eight articles by Professor Nicholas Williams on the Cornish Revival. They range from his “A Problem in Cornish Phonology” (1990) in which he shows that the “phonemes” /dj/ and /tj/ of Kernowek Kemyn were unwarranted, to his review “‘A Modern and Scholarly Cornish-English Dictionary’: a Review of Ken George’s Gerlyver Kernewek Kemmyn” of 2001 in which he demonstrates how at least 370 entries in George’s dictionary are mistaken. Writings on Revived Cornish concludes with a short note on George’s inconsistent lexicographical practice with respect to geographical names, a discussion of the implications for the revived language of the recently-discovered play Bewnans Ke and the text of a lecture on Unified Cornish Revised given by Professor Williams in September 2006.

Cornish Today: An examination of the revived language
By Nicholas Williams
Third edition 2006. Reprinted with corrections 2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-07-7

The publication of Cornish Today by Kernewek dre Lyther in 1995 was a landmark event in the Cornish Revival. In that book, Professor Williams offered the first professional analysis of the various systems of Cornish in use, and also outlined his suggested emendations for Unified Cornish. The present revised edition makes this most important work available to those who may have missed the earlier editions.