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   Books in Scots
Books in the Scots language and in dialects of English.
Crystal's Adventures in a Cockney Wonderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Cockney Rhyming Slang by Charlie Lovett
2015. ISBN 978-1-78201-115-6

Cockney Rhyming Slang, as anyone who has stood at the till in a London souvenir shop could tell you, is a set of slang expressions based on taking the original word (say, “stairs”) and rhyming it with the final word of a short phrase (“apples and pears”), and then, in some cases, shortening the new expression (“apples”). This can lead to a sentence such as: “Careful you don’t slip and fall down the apples”. While the slang is often cited as the “secret language” of the Cockney population of London, many of its expression have entered into general usage, not just in the UK, but throughout the English-speaking world. This is not a translation of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” in the purest sense. It is, rather, the result of a linguistic game—another sort of translation. What Charles Dodgson would have loved most about Cockney Rhyming Slang, and what makes it suited for application to “Alice”, is that it is, as John Ayto writes in his introduction to “The Oxford Dictionary of Rhyming Slang”, “all really part of a giant ongoing word game, whose product is much more droll artefact that linguists’ lexeme”. It is with this idea of Cockney Rhyming Slang as word game, and with the goal of creating “droll artefact”, that this translation has been approached.

Æðelgýðe Ellendǽda on Wundorlande
By Hlóðwíg Carroll, translated into Old English by Peter S. Baker
2015. ISBN 978-1-78201-112-5

Old English (or “Englisc”) is the English language as recorded from around the year 700 to 1100. Spoken by King Alfred the Great and Lady Godiva, the Venerable Bede and Edward the Confessor, it is the language of such classics as Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, and The Seafarer. After 1100 the language went through a period of change so rapid that, by the time two centuries had passed, few could read these old texts. For those interested in learning the oldest variety of English, this translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland may provide a pleasurable study aid: just set the modern text and this one side by side and compare the two. But be careful! In this book, Lewis Carroll’s classic tale has been transported into the distant past, before the English had ever heard of tea, imagined a device as sophisticated as a watch, or even seen a rabbit (a later invasive species). Instead, they drank beer, mead, or (when they could get it) wine; an exceptionally learned scholar might have known how to tell time with an astrolabe; and the most familiar long-eared animal was the hare.

Alice’s Adventchers in Wunderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Scouse by Marvin R. Sumner
2015. ISBN 978-1-78201-107-1

“Scouse” is the name of the unique dialect of English spoken in Liverpool. It is a relatively new dialect, dating to the 19th century, showing some influence of speakers from England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. The Beatles are perhaps the most famous speakers of Scouse, or at least the first speakers who came to public prominence outside the Liverpool region. This book contains a brief sketch of the orthographic principles used in presenting the Liver­pudlian dialect in this edition. The Scouse translation was first prepared by Marvin R. Sumner in 1990, and is now published for the first time in anticipation of the “Alice 150” celebra­tions being held this year.

Alice’s Ventures in Wunderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Cornu-English by Alan M. Kent
2015. ISBN 978-1-78201-102-6

Cornu-English is that form of English spoken by the majority of native residents in Cornwall. It has also spread overseas to be spoken in areas of the world where Cornish migrants lived and worked-in such diverse locations as Australia, the United States of America, New Zealand, Mexico and South Africa. It may be said to be one of three major linguistic groups operating within Cornwall, a Celtic territory in the west of the island of the Britain. The three are Cornish, English and Cornu-English. Within Cornu-English, it is necessary to point out that although the broad vocabulary and grammar remain the same there are some variations in accent. These can be graded from east to west, and from north to south. In general, the accent in the west of Cornwall (in West Penwith, in particular) has remained quite distinctive, with some observers believing this is because of the later persistence of the Cornish language there. This edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is translated with a nod towards the Cornu-English accent of mid Cornwall; in particular that found in the working-class china-clay mining villages to the north of St Austell. This accent and locate remain interesting because for many years there were perceived as not being as picturesque as others parts of Cornwall, and so received less immigration and loss of Cornu-English speakers.

Ahlice’s Adveenturs in Wunderlaant
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Border Scots by Cameron Halfpenny
2015. ISBN 978-1-78201-087-6

This is the first translation into the Border Scots dialect of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Scots was at its peak as a European language of scholars in the 16th century, but its scope and influence has declined since English became Scotland's formal written language in the 17th century. Border Scots has subsequently become primarily an oral dialect, spoken by more than 100,000 people at home, work and play, but not regularly committed to paper for use in a formal context. Recognizing the oral nature of the dialect was an important step in deciding how this first translation of Alice was to be carried out. Border Scots differs from other Scots dialects in terms of its anglicized and unusual flat vowel pronunciations, earning it the moniker of the “yow an mei” dialect. There was an opportunity to echo this sound in the very name of Ahlice, where the drawn out and flattened first syllable acts as an aural clue to the deep timbre this dialect emits in its spoken form. To further achieve this aural effect the common Scots custom of dropping consonants at the end of words and syllables has also been deployed. In particular, applying it to the progressive participle ending -ing to make it -in flattens the sound to a more authentic Borders’ pitch. Elliot Cowan Smith observed nearly a century ago that the Borders dialect will “pass gradually into oblivion” if its spirit is allowed to be lost. It is hoped that the publication of Ahlice’s Adveenturs in Wunderlaant will kindle the spirit and confidence to record the dialect in print more widely, and establish a future role for it in the development of Borders life.

Alison’s Jants in Ferlieland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into West-Central Scots by James Andrew Begg
2014. ISBN 978-1-78201-084-5

Lewis Carroll is the pen-name o Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the screiver o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, an a lecturer in Mathematics at Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson stertit his famous bairns’ tale on 4 July 1862, when, on a bonny simmer’s efternuin, he tuik a lang jant in a rowin boat on the Thames Watter in Oxford, alangside his freen the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, Alice Liddell (ten year-auld) the dochter o the Dean o Christ Church, an her twae sisters, Lorina (aged thirteen), an Edith (juist aicht). Frae the poem at the stert o the buik, it’s plain that thae three wee lassies threipt on at puir Mr Dodgson tae tell thaim a tale. Tho sweirt at the stert, he wycely gied in, an by the en o their day oot, he had gethert thegither the makins o an awfy guid splore aboot a steirin wee lass caad Alice. Spreid richt throu the feenishd wark, furst-published in 1865, are a wheen hauf-hidden references tae the five folk on that boat on that happy day.

Alice’s Adventirs in Wunnerlaun
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Glaswegian Scots by Thomas Clark
2014. ISBN 978-1-78201-070-8

Lewis Carroll wis the pen-name ae Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a professor o mathematics at Christ Church, Oxford. His weel-kent story came aboot while he wis oan a rowin trip up the watter ae the Thames in Oxford oan 4 July 1862. Dodgson wis accompanit oan this outin bi the Rev. Robinson Duckworth an three young lassies: Alice Liddell, the ten-year-auld daughter ae the Dean ae Christ Church, an Alice’s two sisters, Lorina and Edith, who wir thirteen an eight. As ye kin tell fae the poem at the stairt, the three lassies begged Dodgson fir a story, an so he went oan tae tell them, wioot a hale loat ae enthusiasm tae begin wi, an early version ae the story that wis tae become Alice’s Adventirs in Wunnerlaun. Acause ae this, there’s a fair few refrences tae the five traivellers in the boat hauf-hidden away throo-oot the text ae the book, which wis published eventually in 1865.

Alice’s Mishanters in e Land o Farlies
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Caithness Scots by Catherine Byrne
2014. ISBN 978-1-78201-060-9

To tackle a translation of the first book into the Caithness dialect of Scots was a challenge. Catherine Byrne met it by imagining how her mother, reading the book aloud, would have sounded—“hearing my mother’s voice in my head”, as she put it in an e-mail to this writer. The result is engaging and amusing, and those familiar with the Caithness accent will recognize the achievement at once. James Miller has outlined the history and the main characteristics of the dialect in the essay written for Jon Lindseth’s accompanying volume on translations. Suffice it to say here that Caithness dialect is a form of Scots but has some unique features that reflect the cultural and political geography of the north of Scotland in the Middle Ages when the county was a frontier zone, the area where Norse and Gaelic societies met.This conjunction has left its mark on place-names and on the common speech of the inhabitants. .

The Aventures of Alys in Wondyr Lond
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Middle English verse by Brian S. Lee, with illustrations by Byron W. Sewell
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-031-9

Middle English is the name commonly given to the forms of English current from about 1100 to roughly 1500, between pre-Conquest Old English, which is hardly intelligible today without special study, and the early modern English of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Of course it changed considerably during that period, and different dialects existed in various geographical areas. The form of Middle English used in this translation is for the most part the East Midland and London dialect of writers like Chaucer in the fourteenth century, which is the direct ancestor of our modern standard form of English. It is not hard to read with a little practice, but an extensive glossary has been provided to assist the reader where necessary. Imagining what Londoners of the fourteenth or fifteenth centuries might have made of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" provides a historical perspective not only on Chaucer's fourteenth century and Carroll's nineteenth, but on our own time as well.

Ailis’s Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Synthetic Scots by Andrew McCallum
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-026-5

Ailis's Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies is a translation of Lewis Carroll's classic tale into synthetic Scots. Synthetic Scots is the name given by the poet Hugh Mac­Diarmid to a project that sought to rescue Scots as a serious literary language from the cloying sentimentalism and the music-hall self-mockery into which it had degenerated by the early 20th century. This project was prefigured in the work of writers like Violet Jacob and Marion Angus, Robert Louis Stevenson and George Douglas Brown. Alongside Mac­Diarmid, the project was pursued by Robert Garioch, Alastair Mackie, Alexander Scott and Sydney Goodsir Smith. Ailis's Anterins i the Laun o Ferlies is offered as a contribution to the canon of synthetic Scots texts. Because the original is such a popular and well-loved tale, skillfully crafted in simple, clear and undemanding language, but losing none of its literary excellence for all that, the hope is that Ailis will contribute to making Scots more accessible to both Scottish and non-Scottish readers alike.

Ailice’s Anters in Ferlielann
By Lewis Carroll, translated into North-East Scots by Derrick McClure
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-016-6

The North-East dialect of Scots, locally called the "Doric", has a long and distinguished history as the medium of one of the liveliest and most individual local literatures in Scotland. It first emerged in literary form during the Vernacular Revival of the eighteenth century; an outstanding practitioner of the mid-nineteenth century was Lewis Carroll's friend George MacDonald, who, though his lasting renown is mainly founded on his children's books and fantasy stories, wrote many domestic novels set wholly or partly in his North-Eastern calf-ground, in which the dialect is skilfully presented. In translating Alice, Derrick McClure has endeavoured to find some kind of counterpart for every literary and linguistic trick in the original: that is an ambitious aim, but any translation above the level of a mere crib is a tribute to its source, and an original of such ingenuity as this book deserves the highest tribute possible, in a translation which pays full attention to all the clever and delightful tricks with which Carroll adorned his text. It is the author's hope that the translation will be read not simply as a linguistic curiosity or a test case for some of the problems of literary translation, but as a not unworthy addition to the corpus of Doric literature and Scots children's writing.

Alice’s Carrànts in Wunnerlan
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Ulster Scots by Anne Morrison-Smyth
Second edition. 2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-011-1

This buk is the furst translation o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland intae Ulster Scots, a language that comes frae the Lowlans in Scotlan an thin wus brocht intae Norlin Airlan in the early 17th Century. Es it’s a dialect o Scots it haes close links wi standart Inglesh, but thur’s monie differences in baith grammer an vocabulary between the twa languages. The orthography used in this book’s based on the spellins that ir maistly used bae native taakers o Ulster Scots.

Alice’s Adventures in an Appalachian Wonderland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Appalachian English by Byron W. Sewell and Victoria J. Sewell
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-010-4

Lewis Carroll’s classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into over a hundred languages, from French to Japanese to Esperanto. In this translation into the rich dialect of the Appalachian Mountains, the translators have treated the story as a folktale, in order to create the sense that the reader is listening as an adult tells the story to a child. The story has been transported from Victorian English to post-Civil-War West Virginia, into an Appalachian setting appropriate for the dialect. The spelling used aims towards a literary ortho­graphy, rather than towards a phonemic respelling of the language entirely, and so it avoids unnecessary “eye-dialect” (funkshun instead of function, and so forth). The sounds of the language used in Alice’s Adventures in an Appalachian Wonderland will certainly be familiar to most readers, but a short glossary has also been included.

Alice’s Adventirs in Wonderlaand
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Shetland Scots by Laureen Johnson
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-008-1

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: da writer’s richt name wis Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, an he wis a lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began da story apo da fort o July 1862, whin he guid aff in a rowin boat apo da river Thames in Oxford, alang wi da Reverend Robinson Duckworth, wi ten year aald Alice Liddell, da dochter o da Dean o Christ Church, an her twa sisters, thirteen year aald Lorina, an Edith, at wis eight. As we see fae da poem at da begennin o da book, da tree lasses axed Dodgson for a story an, tho at first he wis kinda laith ta dö it, he began to tell dem da first version o da story. He aften smoots in some peerie half-hoidit mention o da five o dem, aa trow da text o da book itsel, at wis published at da lang an da lent in 1865. Dis book is da first owersettin o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland inta Shetland Scots, a kind o Scots spokken in Shetland at’s been influenced bi da Nort Germanic language Norn, at dee’d oot ida eighteent century. Bein a dialect o Scots, hit’s a closs freend ta standard English, but der a lock o differ atween da twa tongues baith ida grammar an ida wirds. In ony language, der aye different opeenions aboot dialect spellin; da spellin at Laureen Johnson uses here is aafil reglar, an staands weel for da language-shö’s written in her midder tongue for mony a year noo.

Alice’s Carrànts in Wunnerlan
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Ulster Scots by Anne Morrison-Smyth
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-80-0 OUT OF PRINT

This buk is the furst translation o Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland intae Ulster Scots, a language that comes frae the Lowlans in Scotlan an thin wus brocht intae Norlin Airlan in the early 17th Century. Es it’s a dialect o Scots it haes close links wi standart Inglesh, but thur’s monie differences in baith grammer an vocabulary between the twa languages. The orthography used in this book’s based on the spellins that ir maistly used bae native taakers o Ulster Scots.

A Furst Readin Book in Ulster Scots
Bae Harriette Taylor Treadwell an Margaret Free, translatet intae Ulster Scots bae Anne Morrison-Smyth
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-68-8

This weeyins’ furst readin book, furst publisht in 1910, is intendet fur early readers, an fur them that teach them. It haes a brev wee vocabulary o jest unner 300 wurds, an presents nine classic yarns: The Wee Rid Hen, The Ginger­bried Weefla, The Oul Wumman an the Pig, The Weefla an the Goat, The Pancake, Chicken Little, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Wee Tuppens, an Wee Spider’s Furst Web.

The book contains more than ninety illustrations bae the artist Frederick Richardson.

Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland
By Lewis Carroll, translated into Scots by Sandy Fleemin
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-64-0

This beuk sets oot the first translation o Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland intae Scots (that we aince caa’d “Inglis”). This leid haes cam doun fae Auld North­umbrian, the Auld English that wis spoken fae the Humber tae the Lothians. It’s a near relation o Staunart English, but there’s many a differ in baith grammar an vocabulary. The translator’s uised tradeetional spellins the likes o wis set doun bi Burns, Scott, Slater an many ither, tho wantin the “apologetic apostrophes” ye aft see in thae beuks. This is gaes alang wi maist writins in Scots fae the aichteenth century on, an reads fine tae modren Scots spaekers bred up tae sic tradeetions.