Feb 16

I just received the following letter from Special Collections at University College Dublin. I am thrilled!

Dear Mr. Everson

I just wanted to let you know that as we now have about thirty of your versions of Alice and associated works we have decided to mount an exhibition showing a cross-section of the books along with an explanatory poster. The exhibition is small and meant only for internal viewing (times are hard!) but it will be located on Level 2 of the library which has a very large daily footfall. You will be very familiar with all the exhibits but if you are in the vicinity of UCD, you are more than welcome to come and see it.

I hope you don’t mind my taking the liberty of quoting a few lines from the Ulster Scot’s version of Alice (The Alice-Cheshire Cat dialogue about universal insanity) on the poster.

The Alice books are all kept here in Special Collections in a climate-controlled store. They may be consulted in our reading room but not borrowed so that they form part of the permanent archival collection. Though Alice goes far beyond the literature of childhood, the Evertype books are a wonderful addition to our Children’s collection which has material dating from Victorian and Edwardian times. They are very much appreciated.

Kind regards
Eugene Roche
Library Assistant
Special Collections
James Joyce Library
University College Dublin

Nov 27

Yma Evertype ow nôtya bos dyllys lyver nowyth Alan M. Kent, Best Goon Brèn, in Sowsnek ha gans trailyans Kernowek gans Neil Kennedy. Pris £11.95. Dhe gafos dhyworth Amazon.co.uk ha dhyworth Spryrys a Gernow. Rag godhvos moy, gweler evertype.com/books/beast.html.

Kebmer with… Yma an Best et agan kerhyn! An daralla nowyth-ma a veu screfys rag redoryon yonk wàr sel a’n whedhel kevrînek a Vest Goon Brèn. Yma an screfor gormelys a Gernow, Alan M. Kent, ow terivas dhyn fatla wrug cath vrâs dos ha gwandra in pow gwyls Kernow. Ot obma daralla yw leun a dhelît ha marth, a vedn cressya agan awen ha trega pell et agan covyon. An pyctours a veu gwrës gen an artyst Gabrielle Cailes neb a ajwon pùb part a Gernow. Leun yw an pyctours a spyrys, a lyw hag a fors hag ymowns y ow portraya wharvosow an whedhel in kenyver poynt hag ow cachya an sens glew a blâss a gefyr ino. Presentys yw an whedhel i’n dhew davas gen trailyans bewek i’n Kernowek a’n eurma a veu screfys gen Neil Kennedy.

Best Goon Brèn: The Beast of Bodmin Moor

Evertype announces the publication of Alan M. Kent’s new book, The Beast of Bodmin Moor, in English and with a Cornish translation by Neil Kennedy. Retail price £11.95. Available from Amazon.co.uk and Spryrys a Gernow. For more information see evertype.com/books/beast.html.

Watch out… the Beast is about! This new story for young readers is based on the mysterious legend of the Beast of Bodmin Moor. The acclaimed Cornish writer Alan M. Kent tells the charming tale of how a big cat came to wander the wild landscape of Cornwall. Filled with delight and wonder, this is a tale to enrich the imagination and stay long in the memory. The illustrations are by Gabrielle Cailes, an artist who knows Cornwall intimately. With wonderful spirit, colour, and energy, they capture the detail of the story and its thrilling sense of place. The story is presented bilingually with a vibrant modern translation into Cornish by Neil Kennedy.

Oct 19

Evertype would like to announce the publication of a new edition of Clive Harcourt Carruther’s translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into the Latin language, Alicia in Terrā Mīrābiī. The book uses John Tenniel’s classic illustrations.

From the introduction:

Ludovīcus Carroll est nōmen fictīcium scrīptōris Carolī Lutwitgī Dodgsōnī, professōris mathēmaticae in Aede Christī Oxoniae. Fābulae initium fēcit diē 4ᵒ̄ mēnsis Jūliī annō 1862ᵒ̄ dum in Tamesī fluviō animī causā rēmigat ūnā cum reverendō virō Robinson Duckworth, cumque Aliciā Liddell (decem annōs nātā), fīliā Decānī Aedis Christī, ejusque duābus sorōribus, Lōrīnā (tredecim annōs nātā) et Ēditā (octō annōs nātā). Dodgsōnus (id quod satis appāret ex poēmate in prīmō librō) ā puellīs rogātus ut aliquid narrāret, quamquam prīmō invītus, fābulae tamen līneā­menta cōn­fingere coepit. Per fābulam perfectam, annō 1865ᵒ̄ tandem ēditam, saepe ad hōs quīnque subobscūrē allūdit.

Hōc in librō offertur lēctōrī nova ēditiō fābulae Alicia in Terrā Mīrābilī in Latīnum annō 1964ō ā Clive Harcourt Carruthers conversae. Differt ā prīmā ēditiōne duābus praecipuīs rēbus: cum quod discrīmen nunc servātur inter i litteram vōcālem et j litteram vim cōnsonantis habentem, tum quod omnēs vōcālēs longae sunt līneolīs superscrīptīs ōrnātae.

Omnium vōcālium longitūdinēs dīligenter exquīsītae sunt, etiam in syllabīs positiōne longīs. In pauciōribus syllabīs, quārum vōcālium longitūdinēs aut nunc incertae sunt, aut manifestē etiam antīquīs temporibus vacillābant, vōcālēs sine līneolīs scrīptae sunt.

Glōssārium Latīnō-Anglicum in ultimō librō magnopere auctum est. Praeter ferē vīgintī Neolatīna vocābula locūtiōnēsque, ut in prīmā ēditiōne, hoc novum glōssārium etiam complectitur plūs ducenta vocābula antīqua tīrōnibus inūsitātiōria. Spērāmus fore ut glōssāriō auctō multō plūrēs lēctōrēs sine aliōrum lexicōrum ūsū ex hōc librō magnam capiant voluptatem.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the beginning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. There are many half-hidden references made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

In this book we present a new edition of Clive Harcourt Carruthers’ 1964 translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Latin. It differs from Carruthers’ original text chiefly in two ways: a regular distinction between the vowel i and the consonant j has been made, and long vowels are marked with macrons consistently throughout.

All vowels have been carefully investigated, including the vowels in syllables long by position. In a few isolated cases where the classical vowel lengths are in dispute, or where usage evidently vacillated, the vowels have been left unmarked.

The Latin-English glossary at the end has been greatly enlarged. Instead of treating only a few Neo-Latin words and phrases peculiar to this book, the extended glossary now also covers over two hundred less common classical words. It is our hope that this will enable a much larger group of our readers to enjoy Carruthers’ translation without having to resort to external dictionaries.

Oct 14

Evertype would like to announce the publication of Áloþk’s Adventures in Goatland, written by noted Carrollian Byron W. Sewell and illustrated by Mahendra Singh.

From the introduction:

Róaž Wiðz (1882–1937), the locally-admired though otherwise little-known Zumorgian translator, spent seventeen years of his miserable life (when he wasn’t tending to his beloved goats) translating Lewis Carroll’s classic “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” into Zumorigénflit and transposing it into Ŋúǧian culture. Sadly, Ŋúǧ was swallowed up by the Soviet Union in 1947. Most of its citizens were either purged (lined up and summarily shot when they refused to combine their goats into a communal herd) or transported to the Gulag for political re-education and attitude adjustment. All cultural artifacts were systematically destroyed and most Zumorigénflit books were burned as part of the Soviet effort to obliterate Ŋúǧ, along with any memory of it. The only known present-day Ŋúǧian survivors of The Great Ŋúǧ Purge (other than any possible survivors of the Gulag, whose descendants might conceivably live in Siberia) are now toothless old women, whose parents fled with them as infants from Ŋúǧ to Transjordan the night of the purge. Today they live (if you can call it that) in a squalid refugee camp on the desert outskirts of Amman surrounded by very unhappy and angry displaced Palestinians. Some of these Ŋúǧian refugees are still able to speak a little Zumorigénflit, though few of them can read it. For those interested in such esoteric things, “Áloþk üjy Gígið Soagénličy” was first published by the Itadabükan Press in the capital city of Sprutničovyurt in 1919. The city, which was mistakenly thought to be a German forward supply area, was literally flattened and burned to the ground by Royal Air Force saturation bombing in 1943, and all that remains of it are a few remnants of the ancient Palace’s foundations and a gigantic reinforced concrete statue of Joseph Stalin, whose face has been shattered by what was probably machine gun target practice. The original story has here been updated to modern times, as if this strange, harsh, and dangerous land still existed in the modern world. It doesn’t, except in my imagination and that of Mahendra Singh, whose heart swells with the Song of the Goat. — Byron W. Sewell

Oct 02

Evertype would like to announce the publication of Alix’s Adventures in Wonderland: Lewis Carroll’s Nightmare, written and illustrated by noted Carrollian Byron W. Sewell.

From the introduction:

Charles Dodgson had had a difficult day photographing young Victor Alexander Parnell, one of Queen Victoria’s godsons. Dodgson wasn’t at all certain of how either the boy’s parents or the Queen would regard the photograph if he let them see it. The image showed a boy with the cold and calculating gaze of a gunman that one might encounter in a saloon in the American West. It had taken no fewer than six attempts to get this image of Alexander, and Dodgson was thoroughly exhausted. The boy had twitched and squinted, blinked and shifted, ruining one plate after another. The trip back to Oxford, with all of the heavy boxes of photographic equipment, had been the final strain of a long and tiring day. By the time he finally reached his rooms he was ready for a simple meal of bread, cheese and a small glass of claret, then immediately off to bed. He would unpack the boxes later in the week, when he had recovered a bit from the expedition. Dodgson pulled the heavy curtains of his rooms together without looking out of the windows onto the quadrangle. He was under the covers and asleep in less than five minutes. And this is what he dreamed…

Sep 21

Evertype would like to announce the publication of a new edition of Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland, written in 1900 by Florence Adèle Evans, and illustrated by Albertine Randall Wheelan.

From the introduction:

Published first in 1900, Florence A. Evans’ Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland is told about a young girl named Alice, whose mother’s younger sister was the famous Alice of Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland. The book, illustrated with delightful drawings by Albertine Randall Wheelan, begins with a set of vignettes exploring the exploits of a number of Wonderland characters, and continues with a series of tales told by story-book animals, some of which are reminiscent of Rudyard Kipling’s Just-So Stories.

Jun 25

Evertype would like to announce the publication of Sandy Fleming’s new translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into the Scots language, Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland. The book uses John Tenniel’s classic illustrations.

From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson wis the makar’s richt name an he wis lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson started the story on 4 July 1862, whan he teuk a turn in a rowin boat aboot the river Thames in Oxford thegither wi the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, wi Ailice Liddell (ten year auld), the dauchter o the Dean o Christ Church, an wi her twa sisters, Lorina (thirteen year auld), and Edith (aicht year auld). The poem at the start o the beuk narrates that the three lassies wis wantin a story aff o Dodgson an, tho no juist eident at first, he startit tae tell the first mak o the story tae them. Many a reference, hauf-scoukit, is made tae the five o them ootthrou the text o the beuk itsel, that wis syne an on published in 1865.

As faur as I ken, this beuk sets oot the first translation o Ailice’s Àventurs in Wunnerland intae Scots (that we aince caa’d “Inglis”). This leid haes cam doun fae Auld Northumbrian, the Auld English that wis spoken fae the Humber tae the Lothians. It’s a near relation o Staunart English, but there’s many a differ in baith grammar an vocabulary.

I’ve uised tradeetional spellins the likes o wis set doun bi Burns, Scott, Slater an many ither, tho wantin the “apologetic apostrophes” ye aft see in thae beuks. This is gaes alang wi maist writins in Scots fae the aichteenth century on, an reads fine tae modren Scots spaekers bred up tae sic tradeetions. Tho this approach is faur fae purist, I’ve ettled at bein as conseestent as possible.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age), the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the beginning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. Many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

To the best of my knowledge, this edition presents the first translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Scots (which historically has also been known as “Inglis”). This language is a descendant of Old Northumbrian, the Old English once spoken from the Humber to the Lothians. It is closely related to Standard English, but differs from it in many particulars of both grammar and vocabulary.

I have used traditional spellings such as might be seen in the works of Burns, Scott, Slater, and many others, though without the “apologetic apostrophes” often seen in these works. This is in harmony with most writings in Scots from the eighteenth century onwards, and makes for comfortable reading for modern Scots speakers brought up with those traditions. Although this approach is far from purist, I have tried to be as consistent as possible.

Feb 03

Evertype is pleased to announce the reprinting of Form and Content in Revived Cornish with articles by Michael Everson, Craig Weatherhill, Ray Chubb, Bernard Deacon, and Nicholas Williams.

Kernowek Kemyn, a form of spelling currently promoted by the Cornish Language Board, has been subject to sustained criticism for nearly two decades since its inception. The form and content of the Cornish Language Board’s publications continue to invite criticism and have inspired this volume. The essays begin with Michael Everson’s review of recent Cornish Language Board typography, includ ing the second edition of Ken George’s Gerlyver Kres, the New Testament in Kernowek Kemyn, George’s Gerlyvrik, and the recent and controversial “preliminary edition” called in Kernowek Kemyn “Bywnans Ke”. This is followed by a reprint of Everson’s review of the first edition of George’s Gerlyver Kres, since reference is made to it in the first article. Craig Weatherhill, one of Cornwall’s foremost experts on place-names, provides the next two articles, both reviews of Cornish Language Board publications, Place-Names in Cornwall and The Formation of Cornish Place-Names. Ray Chubb and Craig Weatherhill collaborated on a short paper in which they provide an analysis of the similarity of Revived Cornish orthographic forms to traditional spellings of Cornish place-names. Bernard Deacon provides two insightful articles, the first on the values expressed in Kernowek Kemyn rhetoric, and the second on the aims and methods of the Cornish Language Board. Finally, Nicholas Williams reviews An Testament Nowydh edited by Keith Syed and published by the Cornish Language Board. First published on 2007-01-09.

Feb 03

Evertype is pleased to announce the reprinting of Towards Authentic Cornish by Nicholas Williams.

Towards Authentic Cornish is in the first place a rebuttal of the defence of Kernowek Kemyn attempted by Paul Dunbar and Ken George in Kernewek Kemmyn: Cornish for the Twenty-First Century. In the present work, Professor Williams demonstrates with examples from the Cornish texts just how unconvincing is George’s defence of Kernowek Kemyn. The latter portions of the book offer a detailed critique of George’s Gerlyver Kernewek Kemmyn and of Wella Brown’s Grammar of Modern Cornish. First published on 2006-11-30.

Feb 03

Evertype is pleased to announce the reprinting of Writings on Revived Cornish by Nicholas Williams.

This book brings together in one convenient volume eight articles by Professor Nicholas Williams on the Cornish Revival. They range from his “A Problem in Cornish Phonology” (1990) in which he shows that the “phonemes” /dj/ and /tj/ of Kernowek Kemyn were unwarranted, to his review “‘A Modern and Scholarly Cornish-English Dictionary’: a Review of Ken George’s Gerlyver Kernewek Kemmyn” of 2001 in which he demonstrates how at least 370 entries in George’s dictionary are mistaken. Writings on Revived Cornish concludes with a short note on George’s inconsistent lexicographical practice with respect to geographical names, a discussion of the implications for the revived language of the recently-discovered play Bewnans Ke and the text of a lecture on Unified Cornish Revised given by Professor Williams in September 2006. First published on 2006-10-30.

Feb 03

Evertype is pleased to announce the reprinting of the third edition of Cornish Today by Nicholas Williams.

The publication of Cornish Today by Kernewek dre Lyther in 1995 was a landmark event in the Cornish Revival. In that book, Professor Williams offered the first professional analysis of the various systems of Cornish in use, and also outlined his suggested emendations for Unified Cornish. The present revised edition makes this most important work available to those who may have missed the earlier editions. First published on 2006-09-30.

Dec 28

Evertype would like to announce the publication of Reinhard F. Hahn’s new translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into the Low German language, Alice ehr Eventüürn in’t Wunnerland. The book uses John Tenniel’s classic illustrations, with text on them localized into Low German (so instead of “DRINK ME”, the bottle says “DRINK MI”, etc.).


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll is de Schrieversnaam vun Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, ’n Mathematik-Dozent in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson füng mit düt Vertelln an ’n 4. Braakmaand 1862 an, as he up’n Thems-Stroom ’n Paddel boottuur möök. Mit vun de Partie weern Paster Robinson Duckworth un dree Deerns: Alice Liddell (de teihn Jahr ole Dochter vun’n Dekaan vun Christ Church) un ẹhr Süstern Lorina (dörteihn Jahr old) un Edith (acht Jahr old). As wi vun’t Riemel an’n Anfang vun’t Book wies wardt, bẹden de dree Deerns Dodgson, dat he jüm wat vertell. So füng he an – toeerst nich so geern – de eerste Verschoon to vertelln. Up un daal in’n egentlichen Text findt sik mennig ’n Andüden an de fief Minschen, de an den Dag tosamen in’t Boot seten. Up’t Lest keem dat Book in’t Jahr 1865 ünner de Lüd’.

So wied mi dat wies is, is düt dat eerste Ọ̈verdrẹgen vun Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in’t Plattdüütsche (Nedderdüütsche). Afstammen dẹ düsse Spraak vun’t Old sassische, vun dat ook to’n Deel dat Ingelsche (d.h. „Angel sassische“) afkeem. Dat Middelsassische (in Düütschland tomehrst „Mittelniederdeutsch“ nöömt) was de Verkehrs spraak vun de Hanse, un vun de Spraak keem vẹẹl Inwarken in de Spraken vun de Noord- un Oostseeküsten, besünners de vun Skandinavien, vun’t Baltikum un vun Noordpooln. Ook dat Ingelsche kreg’ ’n paar Wöör vun’t Middelsassische mit, t.B. trade un sachs ook freight un boss. Hüdigendaags deit dat Plattdüütsche as ’n offitschelle Regionaalspraak in Noorddüütschland un in de nedderlandschen Oostprovinzen gellen. Vör’t Verdrieven an’t Enn vun’n Tweeden Weltkrieg wöör de Spraak ook in Rebeden to Oosten vun de hüdige düütsche Oostgrenz snackt.

Dat Plattdüütsche hett ’n Barg Dialekten un keen Stan dardspraak, ook keen Standardschrievwies’. Dat Ọ̈ver drẹgen in düt Book is in’t allgemeene Noord nedder­sassische. De Schrievwies’ is mehr or minn de vun Sass. Een Punkt ünner ’n Sülvstluudteken bedüüdt, dat ’t ’n Eenluud is. In annere, tomehrst öllere Warken, in de düsse wichtige Ünnerscheed maakt ward, bruukt se faken ’n Haken (ogonek) daarför. Een Apostroph achter b, v, d, g un s an’t Enn vun’n Woord steiht för’n Sleeptoon: de Een- or Tweeluud daarvör ward be sünners lang un de Mitluud week uutspraken (t.B. Lüd’ [lyːˑ(d)], wẹs’ [veːˑz] or [vɛːˑz]). De mehrsten Plattdüütsch schrievers kehrt sik nich an düsse Ünnerscheden, un daar wẹgen wardt ’n Barg Wöör verkehrt uutspraken mank de Lüd’, de sik dat Plattdüütsche tomehrst vun Schriften bibringt.

De Text wöör direktemang vun’t Ingelsche na’t Platt düütsche ọ̈verdragen, man af un an hett de Ọ̈verdrẹger vun wẹgen Woordspẹẹl na de düütsche Verschoon vun Antonie Zimmermann kẹken.

Groten Dank wẹẹt ik mien Kollẹg’ Reinhard “Ron” F. Hahn, den ik al jahrenlang kenn, dat he düt Ọ̈verdrẹgen in de Maak nahmen hett, as ik em daarto nödigen dẹ. Elk Ọ̈verdrẹgen vun düt Book is ’n Họ̈gen, ’n Sprakenfier, ’n Sprakengood.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age), the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the beginning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. Many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

To the best of my knowledge this edition presents the first translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Low Saxon (also known as Low German and by its German name Platt deutsch). This language is a descendant of Old Saxon, one of the ancestors of English. Middle Saxon (also known as Mittel niederdeutsch “Middle Low German” in modern German parlance) served as the international lingua franca of the Hanseatic Trading League and as such influenced many language varieties along the Baltic and North Sea coasts, especially those of Scandinavia, the Baltic Countries and Northern Poland. Contacts with Middle Saxon have resulted in English borrowing from it words like trade and possibly freight and boss. Its numerous modern dialects constitute a regional language that at the end of the 20th century came to be officially recognized in the Eastern Netherlands and in Northern Germany. The language also used to be spoken in regions east of today’s Germany, but at the end of the Second World War this ended with the expulsion of anyone considered German.

In the absence of a standard dialect, the variety used in this book is a somewhat generalized version of Northern Low Saxon, the largest dialect group of Northern Germany. In the absence of a standard orthography, Northern Germany’s predominant Sass Spelling System is applied (with minor changes, such as uut instead of abbreviated ut ‘out (of)’, ‘from’; cf. Scots oot). Long monophthongs are here dis­tinguished from diphthongs by means of a dot below a vowel character. Consistent with the initial but now mostly ignored instructions of the creators of this spelling system, a apostrophe (representing elided -e) following word-final b, v, d, g, and s (/z/) indicates that the vowel or diphthong of that syllable is extra-long and that the usual process of word-final consonant devoicing does not apply (as though the -e were still present (e.g., Lüd’ [lyːˑ(d)] ‘people’, wẹs’ [veːˑz] or [vɛːˑz] ‘be!’). These days, most Low Saxon writers, being unaware of such phonological processes, ignore these important orthographic devices, which results in mispronunciation by learners that rely on the written word.

The Low Saxon translation in this book is based on Carroll’s English original, with rare glances at the handling of names and wordplay in Antonie Zimmermann’s German translation.

I am grateful to my colleague of many years, Reinhard “Ron” F. Hahn, for having taken up the challenge to translate Alice on my instigation. Every translation of this wonderful book is a delight, a celebration of language, and a treasure.

Dec 24

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the translation by Teodorico Pietrocòla Rossetti of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Italian. It had previously been out of print since 1872.


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll è uno pseudonimo: l’autore si chiamava in realtà Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ed era professore di matematica presso il collegio universitario di Christ Church a Oxford. Dodgson iniziò ad abbozzare questo racconto il 4 luglio 1862, durante una gita in barca a remi sul Tamigi nei pressi di Oxford, in compagnia del reverendo Robinson Duckworth e delle figlie del preside di Christ Church: Alice Liddell, di dieci anni, e le sue due sorelle Edith e Lorina, rispettivamente di otto e tredici anni. Come si intuisce dai versi che aprono il libro, le tre bambine chiesero a Dodgson di raccontare una storia ed egli, in un primo momento con una certa riluttanza, iniziò quella che sarebbe diventata la prima versione di questo libro. Lungo tutto il racconto, che vide finalmente le stampe nel 1865, si celano parecchie allu­sioni ai cinque gitanti di quel giorno. Questa edizione ripropone al lettore moderno la prima traduzione italiana del libro, edita nel 1872.

Quella di Teodorico Pietrocòla Rossetti, che Carroll chiama “il mio amico italiano”, è la quarta traduzione di Alice, realizzata dopo quelle in francese, tedesco e svedese. Sono stati effettuati un certo numero di modifiche al testo, per renderlo più accessibile al lettore di oggi. In pratica lo scopo è stato quello di mantenere l’atmosfera ottocentesca della traduzione originale, rimuovendo però gli ostacoli alla lettura.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. There are many half-hidden references made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865. This edition presents the first translation into Italian of 1872 for the modern reader.

The translation by Teodorico Pietrocòla Rossetti, whom Carroll describes as “my Italian friend”, was the fourth translation of Alice, made after the French, German, and Swedish translations. A fair number of changes have been made to the text, in order to make the book a bit more accessible to the modern reader. The intent, basically, was to retain the feel of the ninteenth-century translation while removing impediments to its enjoyment.

Nov 30

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the translation by Emily Nonnen of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Swedish. It had previously been out of print since 1870.


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll är en pseudonym: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson var författarens riktiga namn, och han var föreläsare i matematik i Christ Church i Oxford. Dodgson påbörjade berättelsen den 4 juli 1862 under en roddbåtstur på Themsen i Oxford tillsammans med pastorn Robinson Duckworth, med Alice Liddel (tio år gammal), dotter till dekanen vid Christ Church, och med hennes två systrar, Lorina (tretton år gammal), och Edith (åtta år gammal). Som framkommer av dikten i början av boken bad de tre flickorna Dodgson om en saga, och till att börja med motvilligt började han så berätta den första versionen av berättelsen för dem. Det finns många halvt dolda anspelningar på de fem genom hela boken, som till slut gavs ut 1865.

Denna bok erbjuder den moderna läsaren en nyutgåva av den första översättningen till svenska. Som den tredje översättningen någonsin av Alice till något språk utgavs Emily Nonnens översättning från 1870 ursprungligen i den stavning som var gällande under 1800-talet. Till denna utgåva har stavningen moderniserats, i enlighet med modern ortografi.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the .story to them. There are many half-hidden references made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865

This book is a new edition of the first translation into Swedish, presented for the modern reader. The third translation of Alice into any language, Emily Nonnen’s 1870 version was originally published in a spelling typical of the nineteenth century. In preparing this edition, the spelling has been modernized according to the rules of current Swedish orthography.

Nov 29

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an edition of Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams.


About the book:

Y feu screfys Enys Tresour gans Robert Louis Stevenson i’n bledhynyow 1880 hag 1881. Dalethys veu in Braemar in Scotlond, le may whrug y das gwil gweres dhodho gans y brevyans y honen a vêwnans in gorholyon. Gorfednys veu an novel pàn esa Stevenson in Davos rag an secùnd treveth in gwâv an vledhen 1881-1882. Enys Tresour, neb a dheuth in mes pàn o an auctour udnek bledhen warn ugans bloodh, o y kensa romans hir, ha pàn veu an lyver dyllys avell lyver, Stevenson a recêvas dredho rag an kensa prës sowena in lagasow an bobel. An whedhel-ma a dhalathas apperya in mis Hedra 1881 i’n lyver termyn Sowsnek gelwys Young Folks. I’n termyn-na Cog an Mor, bò Enys Tresour o an tîtel, saw pàn veu dyllys an novel avell lyver in mis Mê 1883, an hanow o Enys Tresour yn udnyk, ha’n hanow-na a gemeras y le in mesk tîtlys a lyvrow classyk liesgweyth cotha. Y fëdh gwelys i’n lyver-ma delinyansow bryntyn Louis Rhead, a veu dyllys rag an kensa prës i’n vledhen 1915. Nicholas Williams a drailyas an lyver-ma dhe Gernowek. Ev a drailyas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland gans Lewis Carroll dhe Gernowek ha dhe Wodhalek Wordhen kefrës.

“Pymthek den wàr gofyr an marow—
Yô-hô-hô, ha botel dowr tobm!
Dewas ha’n Jowl a ladhas y barow—
Yô-hô-hô ha botel dowr tobm!”

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos, Switzerland in the winter of 1881-1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915.

“Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!”

Nov 29

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an edition of Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson.


About the book:

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos, Switzerland in the winter of 1881-1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915.

“Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!”

Oct 13

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of Gladys in Grammarland and Alice in Grammarland, two educational tales inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

Gladys in Grammarland
The two tales in this book are not related to one another, though both are responses to Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland, and both are somewhat didactic in nature.

Audrey Mayhew Allen was born in 1870, and so was about 27 years of age when she wrote Gladys in Grammarland. In this story, Gladys becomes sleepy after class and finds that a Verb Fairy has taken an interest in her education.

Louise Franklin Bache wrote several plays for the Junior Red Cross News, and later published a book Health Education in an American City. The charming Alice in Grammarland was written as a play for “Better Speech Week”, 5–8 November 1923, and “American Education Week”, 18–24 November 1923, and was published in Junior Red Cross News in that month and year. In it, Carroll’s Alice returns to meet her old friends the Hatter and the White Rabbit, together with the King and Queen of Grammarland.

ALICE: Curious! Curiouser! Curiousest! [Scrambling to feet.] No, that is all wrong, Dinah. I mean, curious, more curious, most curious. That is the most curious sight I have ever seen!

RABBIT [rushes back and forth across stage]: The Queen, the Queen! Oh, my dear paws! Oh, my fur and whiskers! She’ll have me executed as sure as cats are cats.

ALICE: [intercepts RABBIT]: I heard you mention a Queen. I’d give anything in the world to see a real Queen.

RABBIT [stops; looks ALICE over; spies cat, shudders; hurries off; speaks over shoulder]: Your language is wantonly extravagant. However, for your benefit I will say that no one who carries a carnivorous, domesticated quadruped is permitted to gaze at my Queen.

ALICE [rushes after RABBIT; grabs sleeve]: You use such long words I am not sure that I know what you mean. If you are by any chance speaking of my cat, I can assure you she will not mind being left at home.

RABBIT [struggling to free himself]: I speak English. If you cannot apprehend the meaning of my words, whose fault is it? [Exit RABBIT.]

Sep 18

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of John Kendrick Bangs’ Rollo in Emblemland, a tale inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. The story tells of a young boy named Rollo who visits a strange country peopled with symbols and icons—emblems of culture like John Bull, Uncle Sam, the Owl, the Stork, Puck, Mr Punch, Father Time, Cupid, and others. Macauley’s line drawings are charming and some of the verse in the book is reminiscent of Carroll’s.

Rollo in Emblemland

From the introduction:

John Kendrick Bangs (1862–1922) was born in Yonkers, New York, and is known for his work as an author, editor, and satirist. In 1884 he became an Associate Editor of Life, later working at Harper’s Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, and Harper’s Young People, in the position of “Editor of the Depart­ments of Humor” for all three from 1889 to 1900. Later he worked as editor of Munsey’s Magazine, of Harper’s Literature, and of the New Metropolitan magazine, and in 1904 he was appointed editor of Puck, perhaps the foremost American humour magazine of its day.

Bangs made two contributions to the Carrollian world. Emblemland was the first, written in 1902 together with Charles Macauley. Caroline Sigler calls this “an Alice-like fantasy”, in which a young American boy named Rollo visits a strange country peopled with symbols and icons. Macauley’s line drawings are charming and some of the verse in the book is reminiscent of Carroll’s.
Bangs’ second contribution was made in 1907. In Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream, Bangs makes light of a range of economic issues as familiar to his contemporary readers as they are to us today: high taxes, corporate greed, bribery, institutional corruption, and gov­ernmental incompetence are among its themes.

“Well, the first poem was about ‘The Jilted Oyster’,” said the Sphinx. “It’s very pathetic and may make you cry just a little bit, but it’s strong—stronger than a great many things that have become famous. Sit perfectly still, now, so as not to disturb my metre, and I’ll recite it to you.”
Rollo crossed his hands in his lap and Mr Punch bowed his head, while the Sphinx recited the poem of “The Jilted Oyster”:—

Emblemland

“The Oyster was a gallant bold
Who loved a Soft Shell Crab.
He called upon her, so I’m told,
Dressed up in pink and drab—
Up to her residence he rolled
In a brand-new hansom cab.

He told her that he deemed her sweet—
A perfect little prize.
He made remarks about her feet,
And also praised her eyes,
And other things I sha’n’t repeat,
But all of them likewise.

He offered her his heart and hand
Down on his bended knee,
And other things so great and grand
They would have conquered me—
A handsome house upon the land,
A home beneath the sea.

He told her that he’d stores of gold
And chests of precious stone—
His cellar was completely coaled
From mines that he did own,
But “Oh,” he cried, “my life is mould
Because I live alone.

“If you will come and be my bride,”
He cried in accents brief,
“In silks and satins you may ride,
Of princesses the chief.
Great happiness will us betide
And squelch my ghoulish grief.”

But she, this haughty crab so fair,
The Oyster would not wed.
She rose out of her rocking-chair
And, tossing high her head,
She sent him from her in despair
Back to his oyster-bed:

Because he was so very meek,
Was lacking so in force,
She couldn’t stand him for a week
Without tabasco sauce,
And that made marriage, so to speak,
Impossible, of course.

Poor wight! In gloom he took his way
Back through the salty tide
Made deeper by the tearful spray
That bubbled from his side,
And later on, the gossips say,
Committed suicide

By striding out upon the sand—
So bitter was his cup—
Nigh to a busy oyster-stand
Where people came to sup,
And there upon the wintry strand
Was straightway gobbled up.”

Aug 29

Nissa has blogged about it, so the cat is out of the bag…

Yes, Ralph Midgley is translating Ventürs jiela Lälid in Stunalän, which Evertype will publish in due course.

The grammar of Volapük is agglutinative. The word ventür [venˈtyr] ‘adventure’ has an -s plural, which is familiar enough. The compound stunalän [stʊnaˈlɛn] is derived from stun ‘wonder, amazement, astonishment’ (evidently based on ‘astonish’ plus a genitive ending -a plus län ‘land, country’ (based on ‘land’). The phrase jiela Lälid [ʃieˈla lɛˈlid] is a genitive, composed of the article el ‘the’ used with names to which is attached the prefix ji- [ʃi]~[ʒi] ‘she’ and the genitive suffix -a.

Why Lälid, you ask? Because Volapük uses initial vowels to represent tenses:

  • o- indicates the future
  • ä- indicates the imperfect
  • e- indicates the perfect
  • u- indicates the future perfect
  • i- indicates the pluperfect
  • ö- indicates the future in the past
  • ü- indicates the future in the past perfect
  • a- indicates the present tense, but this is only used in certain circumstances, such a when an adverb has a temporal sense. Compare: delo ‘by day’, adelo ‘today’, odelo ‘tomorrow’, ädelo ‘yesterday’

Since Alice is—well—not imperfect, *Älis could cause confusion. (There is no verb *lisön, as it happens, but even so.) But Volapük handles this with a prefix l-, as in Lislän ‘Iceland’. But there are also rules in Volapük that discourage the use of -s at the ends of words, since that is the plural marker. Alice derives from Germanic Adalheidis, however, so there’s some justification for using a -d instead. Thus, Lälid, genitive Lälida, accusative Lälidi, dative Lälide. (Note that when preceded by the inflected article the noun does not inflect; jiela Lälid and Lälida mean the same thing.)

Ralph notes that “lälid [is] made up of preposition meaning ‘to be near to’, and the noun lid which means ‘a song’. A person near to a song is almost always happy, and with certain infrequent exceptions, I think this describes Alice very well.”

Aug 22

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of John Rae’s New Adventures of Alice, a sequel to Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

New Adventures of Alice
From the introduction:

John Rae (1882–1963) was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, and was educated at Pratt Institute High School in Brooklyn. In 1900 he attended the Art Students League of New York where he studied under illustrator and artist Howard Pyle. Of the better-known children’s books Rae wrote and illustrated are New Adventures of Alice, Grasshopper Green and The Meadow Mice, and Granny Goose. More than fifty books, and many magazines of the day, sported Rae’s illustrations. From 1935 to 1940, he taught Painting and Design at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida. From the 1930s to the 1950s, Rae engaged in portraiture work, and notably painted the portraits of Carl Sandburg and Albert Einstein. Rae was a member of the Artists Guild, the Artists League of America, and the Society of American Illustrators, and was listed in Who’s Who in America from 1926 to 1958.

Rae’s book fulfils his own wish that Carroll had written another book about Wonderland. In it Alice visits a number of Mother Goose characters, as well as a remarkable artist, a poet, and a printer—characters certainly familiar to John Rae himself.

SECRETS
Come close to me, that I to you a secret may impart;
A secret more important, too, than how to toss a tart.
I’ll whisper in your purple ear, like this, a word or two.
Come nearer, lest they overhear;
They seek the Wurbaloo!

Aug 22

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Saki’s The Westminster Alice, a political parody of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

The Westminster Alice
From the introduction:

Saki was the pen-name of Hector Hugh Munro (1870– 1916). He was an author and playwright best known for his subtle and witty short stories. He wrote for periodicals such as the Westminster Gazette, the Daily Express, the Bystander, the Morning Post, and the Outlook.

Francis Carruthers Gould (1844–1925) was a political cartoonist and caricaturist who contributed to the Pall Mall Gazette until he joined the Westminster Gazette when it was founded. He later became an assistant editor for that publication. In addition to illustrating Saki’s Westminster Alice in a series of publications from 1900 to 1902, Gould also illustrated Charles Geake’s parody John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland, published in 1904.

The Westminster Alice vignettes were collected together and published in Westminster Popular No. 18 in 1902. Twenty-five years later, John Alfred Spender (1862–1942), who had edited the Westminster Gazette from 1896 until 1922, published them again with a foreword and a set of footnotes. These are re-published here, to help guide the reader into understanding and appreciating the context of Saki’s parodies.

In his 1927 edition, Spender re-arranged the vignettes in chronological order—that is, in the order in which they had been published in the Westminster Gazette. Here, I have reverted to the order in which Saki had published them in 1902, as it seems to me that he may have arranged them thus for reasons of narrative or—well, to be honest, I don’t know, but I’d rather not second-guess him. The dates of publication are given for those readers interested in the chronology, however.

I am grateful to the University of Bristol Library, Special Collections, for permission to reproduce Francis Carruthers Gould’s “His own Inventions”, originally published in 1922, as an appendix to this edition.

I am likewise grateful to Hugh Cahill, Assistant Librarian at the Foyle Special Collections Library in King’s College London for his permission to reprint, as an afterword, his 2008 review of The Westminster Alice, which first appeared on the web in a slightly different form as as one of continuing series of pieces based on notable items from the collections of the Foyle Special Collections Library.

Alice certainly was; the Knight was riding rather uncomfortably on a sober-paced horse that was prevented from moving any faster by an elaborate housing of red-tape trappings. “Of course, I see the reason for that,” thought Alice. “If it were to move any quicker the Knight would come off.” But there were a number of obsolete weapons and appliances hanging about the saddle that didn’t seem of the least practical use.

“You see, I had read a book,” the Knight went on in a dreamy far-away tone, “written by someone to prove that warfare under modern conditions was impossible. You may imagine how disturbing that was to a man of my profession. Many men would have thrown up the whole thing and gone home. But I grappled with the situation. You will never guess what I did.”

Alice pondered. “You went to war, of course—”

“Yes; but not under modern conditions.”

Aug 08

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the translation by Selyf Roberts of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Welsh. It had previously been out of print for 25 years.


From the introduction:

Llysenw yw Lewis Carroll: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson oedd enw iawn yr awdur a oedd yn ddarlithydd mewn Mathemateg yng Ngholeg Eglwys Crist, Rhydychen. Cychwynnodd Dodgson y stori ar 4 Gorffennaf 1862, pan aeth ar daith mewn cwch rhwyfo ar afon Tafwys yn Rhydychen gyda’r Parchedig Robinson Duckworth, Alice Liddell (deng mlwydd oed), merch Deon Coleg Eglwys Crist, a chyda’i dwy chwaer, Lorina (tair blwydd ar ddeg oed), ac Edith (wyth mlwydd oed). Fel sy’n amlwg o’r gerdd ar ddechrau’r llyfr, gofynnodd y tair merch i Dodgson adrodd stori, ac o’i anfodd i gychwyn dechreuodd adrodd fersiwn cyntaf y stori iddynt. Ceir llawer o gyfeiriadau hanner cuddiedig i’r pump ohonynt drwy gydol testun y llyfr ei hun a gyhoeddwyd o’r diwedd yn 1865.

Cynhyrchodd Selyf Roberts drosiad Cymraeg talfyredig a ffurfiol braidd yn 1953. Yn 1982, bron i ddeng mlynedd ar hugain yn ddiweddarach, teimlai’r angen i’w ddisodli â throsiad llawn o’r newydd mewn arddull ystwythach. Ar graffiad newydd yw hwn o gyfieithiad Roberts o 1982, wedi’i gysodi o’r newydd ac yn cynnwys lluniau John Tenniel. Wrth baratoi’r argraffiad hwn, gwnaethpwyd mân newidiadau i’r orgraff a’r gystrawen i gydymffurfio ag arferion cyfoes.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the .story to them. There are many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865

Selyf Roberts produced an abridged and rather formal translation in 1953 which nearly thirty years later in 1982 he felt needed to be replaced by a full-length fresh translation in a somewhat more natural style. This is a new edition of Selyf Roberts’ 1982 Welsh translation, freshly typeset and con taining John Tenniel’s illustrations. In preparing this edition, minor alterations have been made to the spelling and syntax to conform with current Welsh practice.

Jul 23

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of John Kendrick Bangs’ Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream, an economic parody of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream
From the introduction:

John Kendrick Bangs (1862–1922) was born in Yonkers, New York, and is known for his work as an author, editor, and satirist. In 1884 he became an Associate Editor of Life, later working at Harper’s Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, and Harper’s Young People, in the position of “Editor of the Depart­ments of Humor” for all three from 1889 to 1900. Later he worked as editor of Munsey’s Magazine, of Harper’s Literature, and of the New Metropolitan magazine, and in 1904 he was appointed editor of Puck, perhaps the foremost American humour magazine of its day.

Bangs made two contributions to the Carrollian world. In 1902 with Charles Macauley he wrote what Caroline Sigler calls “an Alice-like fantasy”, Emblemland, a in which a young American boy named Rollo visits a strange country peopled with symbols and icons. Macauley’s line drawings are charming and some of the verse in the book is reminiscent of Carroll’s.

In Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream, Bangs makes light of a range of economic issues familiar to his 1907 readers—all of which are topical and all-too familiar to today’s reader as well. High taxes, corporate greed, bribery, institutional corruption, and govern­mental incompetence are among the themes of this book.

As an Alice imitation per se, Bangs’ Alice in Blunderland is not, perhaps, one of the most successful in recreat­ing the atmo­sphere of Wonder­land. In some regards it relies more on absurdity than it does on nonsense, and some of the humour is indeed rather American. A sequel like A New Alice in the Old Wonder­land by Anna Matlack Richards has considerably more weight as a novel, but to some degree this reflects Richards’ interest in responding to, and subverting, Carroll’s original story. Bangs’ intention—and in this he succeeds—is to make his reader smile wryly rather than laugh out loud, for his satire is very much on target.

“Yes,” said the Hatter. “The March Hare and the White Knight and I. We’ve started a city to do it with. We’ve sprinkled our streets with Rough on Copperations until there isn’t one left in the place. Everything in town belongs to the People—streetcars, gutters, pavements, theatres, electric light, cabs, manicures, dogs, cats, canary birds, hotels, barber shops, candy stores, hats, umbrellas, bakeries, cakeries, steakeries, shops—you ca’n’t think of a thing that the city don’t own. No more private ownership of anything from a toothbrush to a yacht, and the result is we are all happy.”

“It sounds fine,” said Alice. “Though I think I should rather own my own toothbrush.”

“You naturally would, under the old system,” assented the Hatter. “Under a system of private ownership, owning your own teeth, you’d prefer to own your own toothbrush, but our Council has just passed a law making teeth public property. You see we found that some people had teeth and other people hadn’t, which is hardly a fair condition under a Republican form of Government. It gave one class of citizens a distinct advantage over other people and the Declaration of Independ ence demands absolute equality for all. One man owning his own teeth could eat all the hickory nuts he wanted just because he had teeth to crack ’em with, while another man not having teeth had either to swallow ’em whole, which ruined his digestion, or go without, which wasn’t fair.”

“I see,” said Alice.

Jul 09

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the 1869 translation by Henri Bué of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in French.


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll est un nom de plume : le vrai nom de cet auteur était Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ; il était professeur de mathématiques à Christ Church à Oxford. Dodgson inventa l’histoire d’Alice le 4 juillet 1862, lors d’une promenade en barque sur la Tamise, à Oxford, en compagnie du Révérend Robinson Duckworth, d’Alice Liddell, la fille du Doyen de Christ Church (qui avait alors dix ans), et de ses deux sœurs, Lorina (qui avait treize ans) et Edith (qui avait huit ans). Ainsi que l’explicite le poème au début du livre, les trois fillettes demandèrent à Dodgson une histoire et c’est d’abord à contrecœur qu’il commença à leur raconter la première version de l’histoire. On peut retrouver de nombreuses références à demi cachées à eux cinq dans le texte du livre même.

Cette édition présente la première traduction en français de 1869 pour le lecteur moderne. La traduction d’Henri Bué fut la deuxième traduction d’Alice dans une autre langue. Bué demanda l’avis de Lewis Carroll pour cette traduction, que l’on qualifia de « traduction autorisée ».

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. Many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

This edition presents the first translation into French of 1869 for the modern reader. The translation by Henri Bué was the second translation of Alice into any language. Bué consulted with Lewis Carroll on the translation, which was described as “authorized”.

Jun 22

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the translation by Brian Stowell of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Manx.


From the introduction:

Ta Lewis Carroll ny ennym-penney: she Charles Lutwidge Dodgson va ennym kiart yn ughtar as v’eh ny leaghteyr maddaght ayns Keeill Chreest, Oxford. Hug Dodgson toshiaght da’n skeeal y chiarroo laa Jerrey Souree 1862, tra hie eh er turrys ayns baatey-ymmyrt er yn awin Thames ayns Oxford marish yn Arrymagh Robinson Duckworth, marish Alice Liddell (jeih bleeaney dy eash), inneen Dean Cheeill Chreest, as marish e daa huyr, Lorina (tree bleeaney jeig dy eash), as Edith (hoght bleeaney dy eash. Myr s’baghtal veih’n daan ec toshiaght y lioar, hirr ny tree inneenyn skeeal er Dodgson as dy neuarryltagh hoshiaght ghow eh toshiaght dy insh y chied lhiaggan jeh’n skeeal daue. Shimmey imraaghyn lieh-follit ta jeant my nyn gione fud teks y lioar hene, va currit magh er jerrey ayns 1865.

Shoh y trass chur magh jeh çhyndaays Brian Stowell gys Gailck. Haink y chied chur magh rish ayns 1990; y nah fer ayns 2006 fo’n ennym Ealish ayns Çheer ny Yindyssyn, lesh jallooyn liorish Eric Kineald. Ta’n cur magh shoh soiaghey’n teks sy chummey cheddin as my lioaryn Alice elley—y cummey lioaragh as bree currit da ec Annotated Alice Martin Gardiner—as t’eh gymmydey ny jallooyn ardghooagh liorish y Reejerey John Tenniel. Ta kiare jeu shoh jeant er aght er lheh da’n çhyndaays Gailckagh: ta’n lipaid er boteil Alice gra “IU MEE”, as ta’n lipaid er edd yn Eddeyder gra “Syn ’Assan shoh 10/6”.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the beginning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. There are many half-hidden references made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

This is the third edition of Brian Stowell’s translation into Manx. The first appeared in 1990; the second in 2006 under the title Ealish ayns Çheer ny Yindyssyn, with illustrations by Eric Kineald. The present edition sets the text in the same style as my other Alice books—the book design inspired by Martin Gardiner’s Annotated Alice—and uses the famous illustrations by Sir John Tenniel. Four of these have been localized for the Manx translation: the label on Alice’s bottle says “IU MEE”, and the tag on the Hatter’s hat says “Syn ’Assan shoh 10/6”.

Jun 12

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Charles Geake and Francis Carruthers Gould’s John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland, an economic parody of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland
From the introduction:

John Bull is the personification of Great Britain (or at least of England). He was first created in 1712 by John Arbuthnot, and eventually became a common sight in British editorial cartoons of the 19th and early 20th centuries. John is a sort of British Everyman, endowed with common sense and good intentions, who likes a pint of beer. In his trip to the Fiscal Wonderland, John’s frustrations with the bewildering nonsensicality of economic politics are made apparent by the author and illustrator.

Charles Geake (1867–1919) was, from 1892 to 1918, the head of the Liberal Publication Department, which had been established in 1887 by the National Liberal Federation (a union of all English and Welsh (but not Scottish) Liberal Associations), and the Liberal Central Association (an organization which had been founded in 1874 to facilitate Liberal Party communication throughout United Kingdom).

Francis Carruthers Gould (1844–1925) was a political cartoon ist and caricaturist who contributed to the Pall Mall Gazette until he joined the Westminster Gazette when it was founded. He later became an assistant editor for that publication. Before he illustrated John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland in 1904, Gould had already done the illustrations for Saki’s Westminster Alice in a series of publications from 1900 to 1902.

More than a century on, it is not always easy to identify the people caricatured by Gould. Still more arduous would be to attempt to explain the jokes and allusions by made by Geake—that would be material for an academic thesis. Nevertheless I can supply a few biographical summaries and photos to assist the reader to put the cartoon parodies into context and guide the reader who wishes to pursue an interest in any of these characters, or in the particulars of Tariff Reform, Free Trade, the Free Food League, etc.

I hope I have identified the players correctly: I am really no expert in early twentieth-century British politics. Not that I, or you, need to be to enjoy this book. The story’s parody of Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland books is still relevant and amusing even today. Today’s bankers and politicians seem not to have learned much from history. Regrettable as that is, at least Charles Geake and Francis Carruthers Gould can still make us laugh about it!

This time it was the White Knight, whom John recognized as having met before on the parade ground when he was driven off the field by the mutinous loaves. He came up to John’s side, exactly as the Red Knight had done, and tumbled off too, exactly in the same way. Then he got on his horse again, and the two Knights sat and glared at each other without speaking, John growing more and more bewildered all the time as to what they wanted him for and what they would do to him when they had got him.

“He’s mine—you know,” the Red Knight said at last.

“He was until I came and rescued him!” the White Knight replied.

“Well, we must fight for him, then,” said the Red Knight, as he took up his helmet (which hung from his saddle and looked to be a very odd kind) and put it on.

“You will observe the Rules of Arithmetic, of course?” the Red Knight added, as he put on his helmet.

“It all depends,” said the White Knight; and they began banging away at each other with so much noise that John got behind a tree so as to escape all chance of getting hit.

“These Rules seem to be very odd,” said John to himself, as he looked on at the fight. “One Rule seems to be that if one Knight makes a motion the other makes an exactly contrary one: if one becomes motionless, the other does so too. And when either makes a good point, his horse stamps the ground as if he were cheering at a political meeting.”

Apr 08

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Caroline Lewis’ Lost in Blunderland , a political parody of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

Lost in BlunderlandFrom the introduction:

Clara in Blunderland was written in 1902 and details the adventures of Arthur Balfour while being groomed to become Prime Minister—the Clara of Lost in Blunderland, published in 1903, is Balfour once he got the job. The two novels deal with British frustration and anger about the Boer War and with Britain’s political leadership at the time.

Caroline Lewis is a pen-name, that of the team of Edward Harold Begbie (1871–1929), J. Stafford Ransome (born 1860), and M. H. Temple. Much of Begbie’s work was as a journalist, though he also wrote non-fiction, biographies, and some twenty-five novels, ranging from children’s stories to explorations of per sonal psychology and spirituality. He wrote some of his best-known investigative and satirical work under the pen-name “A Gentleman with a Duster”.

J. Stafford Ransome, the illustrator of both Blunderland books, also worked as a journalist. Moreover he wrote on such wide-ranging subjects as labour relations, engineering in South Africa, and woodworking machinery. In 1902 M. H. Temple collaborated again with Begbie and Ransome in The Coronation Nonsense Book (in the style of Edward Lear). In 1894 he contributed satirical political verse to The Hawarden Horace by Charles L. Graves.

Caroline Lewis’ jokes and allusions are too rich and densely woven into this book to explain them all—more a theme for an academic thesis than for a foreword like this, and I am no expert in any case. But I can supply a few biographical summaries (to 1903) and photos to assist the reader to put the cartoon parodies into context, and guide the reader who wishes to pursue an interest in any of these characters, or in the particulars of Balfour’s early premiership.

But you don’t need to be an expert in early twentieth-century British politics to enjoy either book—the story’s parody of Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland books is still fresh and funny even more than a century later. Politics and politicians haven’t changed much, it seems, in a century. That may be regrettable—but at least Caroline Lewis can still make us laugh about it!

“Now, the proper way,” the Goat continued, to reduce yourself with these tabloids is to swallow them with your eyes shut as tight as possible, and then to go immediately to the country. That’ll reduce you quickly enough.”

Clara, like her Aunt Sarum, was always fond of quack remedies, so she did as she was told and swallowed the tabloids.

They were very nasty, and tasted like a mixture of Board Schools, County Councils, and Curates; but she, got them down at last.

Then a most curious thing happened. No sooner had she swallowed the drugs than everything seemed to go round and round, and she found herself swimming about in a great pool of water. The Goat and the shop and everything else had disappeared, and she realized at once that she was quite at sea.

Apr 03

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Caroline Lewis’ Clara in Blunderland , a political parody of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

Clara in BlunderlandFrom the introduction:

Caroline Lewis is a pen-name, that of the team of Edward Harold Begbie (1871–1929), J. Stafford Ransome (born 1860), and M. H. Temple, who wrote both Clara in Blunderland and a sequel, Lost in Blunderland. These two novels deal with British frustration and anger about the Boer War and with Britain’s political leadership at the time. Much of Begbie’s work was as a journalist, though he also wrote non-fiction, biographies, and some twenty-five novels, ranging from children’s stories to explorations of per sonal psychology and spirituality. In 1917, he publicly agreed with the pacifists in their opposition to the war and defended the right conscientious objectors not to fight in it. Later he wrote some of his best-known investigative and satirical work under the pen-name “A Gentleman with a Duster”.

J. Stafford Ransome, the illustrator of both Blunderland books, also worked as a journalist. Moreover he wrote on such wide-ranging subjects as labour relations, engineering in South Africa, and woodworking machinery.

In 1902 M. H. Temple collaborated again with Begbie and Ransome in The Coronation Nonsense Book (in the style of Edward Lear). Previously in 1894 he contributed satirical political verse to The Hawarden Horace by Charles L. Graves.

I should make it clear that I am not a student of early twentieth-century British politics—but I’m not publishing this book because of its value to the study of that time and place. I’m publishing it because it’s a splendid parody, amusing both for what it parodies as for its reflection of Carroll’s original.

It is by no means my intention to annotate this edition, but I can—with the help of a review in the British Empire League’s periodical United Australia (“One people one destiny”)*—give some guidance to the reader. In the section “Literary Note and Books of the Month”, Evelyn Dickinson, writes from London:

Clara in Blunderland, by Caroline Lewis, (Heinemann, 6s.).
A small volume of capital fooling. Caroline Lewis has kept as closely as possible to the lines of Lewis Carroll, and “S. R.” has wrought as much as possible like Sir John Tenniel, so that familiar echoes and resemblances pursue us all the while we read. “Clara” is Mr Balfour; “Blunderland” is the politics of the moment, wherein play the Red Queen (Mr Chamberlain); the Duchess (Lord Salisbury), who is also referred to by Clara as “Aunt Sarum”; Crumpty-Bumpty (Mr Campbell-Bannerman); the Walrus (Sir William Harcourt); the Dalmeny Cat (Lord Rosebery); and various other prominent statesmen. Many a true word is spoken here in jest.

Biographical summaries (to 1902) and photos will certainly help the reader to put the cartoon parodies into context, and guide the reader who wishes to pursue an interest in any of these characters, or in the ramifications of the Second Boer War in general.

In the end, in 2010, Clara in Blunderland has to stand on its own in a way that it didn’t in 1902. In my opinion it survives the passage of a century surprisingly well. Politics and politicians haven’t changed much, it seems, in a century. That may be regrettable—but at least Caroline Lewis can still make us laugh about it!

“No room! No room!” cried the March Hare, with a strong Irish brogue.

“There’s plenty of room!” said Clara. “Why, there are more tea-cups than people, ever so many. Besides, I didn’t know it was your table.”

This made the March Hare laugh a great deal. “It isn’t a table at all,” he said. “It’s a platform. It’s not all mine. The part above board belongs to him—” pointing to the Hatter with his spoon “—and all the rest to me. The Dormouse thinks he has a share in it too, but he hasn’t. That’s only our fun, you know.”

“Your views want broadening,” said the Hatter, suddenly. He had been looking at Clara for some time with great curiosity.

Mar 25

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of the 1869 translation by Antonie Zimmermann of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in German.


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll ist ein Pseudonym. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson war der eigentliche Name des Autors; er war Dozent für Mathematik am Christ Church College in Oxford. Dodgson begann die Geschichte am 4. Juli 1862 bei einer Ruderpartie auf der Themse in Oxford, zusammen mit Pfarrer Robinson Duckworth, mit Alice Liddell (zehn Jahre) – der Tochter des Dekans der Christ Church –, und mit ihren beiden Schwestern Lorina (dreizehn Jahre) und Edith (acht Jahre). Wie man dem Gedicht am Anfang des Buches entnehmen kann, baten die drei Mädchen Dodgson um eine Geschichte und, zunächst widerwillig, begann er, ihnen die erste Version dieser Geschichte zu erzählen. Es gibt im Text des Buches, das schließlich im Jahre 1865 veröffentlicht wurde, viele versteckte Bezüge zu den fünf Personen.

Diese Ausgabe präsentiert die erste deutsche Übersetzung von 1869 für den heutigen Leser. Diese Übersetzung von Antonie Zimmermann war die erste Alice-Übersetzung in eine andere Sprache überhaupt. Sie wurde ursprünglich in Fraktursatz und in der für das neunzehnte Jahrhundert typischen Rechtschreibung veröffentlicht. Für die vor liegende Ausgabe wurde die Orthographie behutsam und nach den Regeln der bewährten deutschen Rechtschreibung modernisiert.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the story to them. There are many half-hidden references are made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865.

This edition presents the first translation into German of 1869 for the modern reader. The translation by Antonie Zimmermann was, in fact, the first translation of Alice into any language. It was originally published in a Fraktur typeface, and was written in a spelling typical of the nineteenth century. In preparing this edition, the spelling has been modernized with care and according to the rules of proven German orthography.

Mar 15

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland retold in words of one syllable by Lewis Carroll, abridged and retold by Mrs J. C. Gorham.

From the back cover:

In the early twentieth century, great books were often “retold in words of one syllable” so that the language would be easier for beginning readers. In this adaptation, Mrs J. C. Gorham “cheats” only a little, hyphenating some longer words that couldn’t be avoided—but the text remains a lively and enjoyable retelling of Lewis Carroll’s classic tale. Recommended for young readers and for adult literacy classes.

From the introduction:

Mrs J. C. Gorham, alas, is known to us only by her married name—and this means, by the usual practice of the time, that her husband was named J. C. Nevertheless, Mrs Gorham is notable for having written three books in “Burt’s Series of One Syllable Books”, Gulliver’s Travels (1896) and Black Beauty (1905) being her other two, with some eleven other books in this “series of Classics, selected specially for young people’s reading, and told in simple language for youngest readers”.

M. Sarah Smedman, in an article about Gulliver’s Travels as a children’s book, makes reference to Mrs Gorham’s adaptation:

Interesting if only because it evinces the challenge posed by a clever game, the book has a liveliness of style derived from varied sentence patterns and apt diction. Gorham cheats only a little when she divides the months of the year into hyphenated words.

Having read the Gulliver’s Travels retelling, I can say that it is a fine example of monosyllabic writing—Smedman makes no overstatement. Although Mrs Gorham “cheats” rather a bit more than this in her 1905 retelling of Alice—her style is still both vigorous and enjoyable. It is for this reason that Mrs Gorham’s “Alice imitation” (to use Carolyn Sigler’s term) deserves to be put back into print.

Quite unlike this is the rather dreadful 1908 version pub­lished by Saalfield, which, although claiming to be “in words of one syllable” is in fact no more than a hyphenated edition of Carroll’s text, which inexplicably omits two chapters entirely: “Pig and Pepper” and “The Lobster-Quadrille”.

Another version, genuinely monosyllabic, was published by Routledge & Sons sometime between 1900 and 1909. (The approximate date can be guessed from the publisher’s device on the title page.) Unfor­tu­nately, nowhere does the book inform us who did the retelling.

Retelling in words of one syllable is indeed a “clever game” and I dare say it isn’t easy to do—not convincingly, anyway. Mrs Gorham achieved it: her retelling in simple language for younger and early readers is still worth reading today.

“Do you like your size now?” asked the Cat-er-pil-lar.
“Well, I’m not quite so large as I would like to be,” said Al-ice; “three inch-es is such a wretch-ed height to be.”
“It is a good height, in-deed!” said the Cat-er-pil-lar, and reared it-self up straight as it spoke (it was just three inch-es high).
“But I’m not used to it!” plead-ed poor Al-ice. And she thought, “I wish the things would-n’t be so ea-sy to get mad!”
“You’ll get used to it in time,” the Cat-er-pil-lar said, and put the pipe to its mouth.
Al-ice wait-ed till it should choose to speak. At last it took the pipe from its mouth, yawned once or twice, then got down from its perch and crawled off in the grass. As it went it said, “One side will make you tall, and one side will make you small.”
“One side of what?” thought Al-ice to her-self.
“Of the mush-room,” said the Cat-er-pil-lar, just as if it had heard her speak; soon it was out of sight.

Mar 13

More cosmetic changes! The front and back covers of my editions of Through the Looking-Glass are being updated (that’ll be English and Irish)

The new ones are the two to the top; the old ones are below.

Mar 10

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an omnibus edition of Caradar’s short stories, Whedhlow Kernowek: Stories in Cornish.

From the back cover:

Heb dowt vÿth yth o Caradar (A. S. D. Smith, 1883–1950) an gwella scrifor a Gernowek a dhedhyow avarr an dasserghyans. Y fÿdh kefys i’n lyver-ma try rew a whedhlow dhyworth y bluven ev hag a veu gwelys rag an kensa prÿs lies bledhen alebma. An kensa bagas a whedhlow yw kemerys in mes a’y gùntellyans Nebes Whedhlow Ber (1948); yma an secùnd rew a whedhlow kemerys dhyworth y lyver Whethlow an Seyth Den Fur a Rom (1948), ha’n tressa bagas a whedhlow a veu gwelys in dadn an tîtel “Forth an Broder Odryk” in Kemysk Kernewek: A Cornish Miscellany (1964). Yma kefys i’n lyver-ma kefrÿs gerva usy moy ès 1,400 ger ha hanow styrys inhy.

Without any doubt Caradar (A. S. D. Smith, 1883–1950) was the best writer of Cornish of the early revival. Three groups of stories from his pen will be found in this book that were all published many years ago. The first group come from his collection Nebes Whethlow Ber (1948); the second group of stories are to be found in his Whethlow an Seyth Den Fur a Rom (1948), and the third series appeared with the title “Forth an Broder Odryk” in Kemysk Kernewek: A Cornish Miscellany (1964). The book also contains a vocabulary in which more than 1,400 words and names are glossed.

Mar 08

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Lewis Carroll’s The Nursery “Alice” . The book is not a facsimile, but a has been re-set in the style of Evertype’s other Alice books, and containing John Tenniel’s illustrations in full colour, taken from an original first edition copy of the book.

The Nursery AliceFrom the introduction:

Lewis Carroll published Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865 and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There in 1872. In the entry in his diary for 15 February 1881 he records: “I wrote to Macmillan to suggest a new idea: a ‘Nursery Edition’ of Alice with pictures printed in.” On 20th February 1889, some eight years later, after much preparation and negotiation with both publisher and illustrator, the text was at last ready. The illustrator was John Tenniel, who coloured twenty of his original illustrations in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” for this “Nursery Edition”. The front and back cover (reprinted here as the frontispiece and on page xiv) were designed by Carroll’s friend Emily Gertrude Thomson.

The story itself is intended for pre-school children “aged from Nought to Five”. Running to just under 7,000 words, it is considerably shorter than both Alice’s Adventures under Ground (15,500 words) and Alice’s Adventures in Wonder­land (27,500 words). Much of the narrative consists of the author’s addressing the young listener, explaining the story by reference to the illustrations. The effect is rather charming, particularly where Carroll pokes fun at features in Tenniel’s illustrations. These were quite skilfully and attractively coloured. Interestingly, Tenniel coloured Alice’s dress yellow with a blue trim and white apron, whereas nowadays most artists colour the dress in blue and white only. (In Nick Willing’s 1999 film Alice in Wonderland, Tina Majorino’s Alice wore a yellow dress.)

In order to produce this volume, the original edition was scanned; the paper, being more than 120 years old, has darkened somewhat. The images below have not been doctored, however, except that the border surrounding the illustrations has been removed.

Here, as in my other editions of Alice books, I have kept to the book design inspired by Martin Gardiner’s Annotated Alice. Since Carrollians are often interested in such details, I will note a few editorial changes which I have made to the text. I have normalized the text for consistency with Carroll’s preferred spellings “ca’n’t” and “wo’n’t”. I have preferred the more modern “wagon” to “waggon” and “stayed” to “staid”. I have added the phrase “on page 8” and changed “this leaf” to “page 40” to guide the reader to two illustrations. In places, Carroll’s punctua­tion has been altered to conform to modern practice.

This edition also contains Carroll’s introductory poem “A Nursery Darling”, his 1890 Preface, and, as appendices, his “Easter Greetings” and “Christmas Greet­ings” to children. These were also published in the 1868 printed edition of Alice’s Adventures under Ground.

Once upon a time, there was a little girl called Alice: and she had a very curious dream.
Would you like to hear what it was that she dreamed about?

Mar 04

OK, it’s cosmetic, but the front and back covers of my editions of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland are being updated (that’ll be Cornish, English, Esperanto, and Irish)

The new ones are the two to the top; the old ones are below.

Jan 30

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of Henry Jenner’s Handbook of the Cornish Language.

From the preface:
This new edition of Jenner’s classic Handbook of the Cornish Language appears more than a century after the book’s first publication. Now that the Cornish Revival has weathered many storms, it is well worth making Jenner’s ground-breaking work available again, copies of the 1904 edition having become rare and expensive.

A useful way to have another look at Jenner’s place in the Revival is to compare the contents of the 1904 Handbook with the three articles Jenner published between 1873 and 1877, near the begin­ning of his researches into Cornish. These articles are reproduced below as appendices to the main text. The orthographic system which Jenner used in 1904 was the culmination of many years of work, but it is important to notice that Jenner was aware three decades earlier of Alexander Melville Bell’s 1865 “Visible Speech”, and of Alexander John Ellis’ 1867 “Palæotype” and 1871 “Glossic”. Jenner’s familiarity with these pre­cursors of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is significant. It shows him to have had real phonetic training. It places his work in the context of modern linguistics.

And linguist is certainly the word which one must apply to Jenner.  His achievement was truly remarkable. Synthesizing the texts, the description in Edward Lhuyd’s 1707 Archaeologia Britannica, Edwin Norris’ 1859 Sketch of Cornish Grammar, Robert Williams’ 1865 Lexicon Cornu-Britannicum, and Frederick Jago’s 1882 English-Cornish Dictionary, Jenner sorted it all out: he devised a system which was practical enough to use to begin to revive the language. He uses an orthography that supports Late Cornish while still retaining a connection to the orthographic forms of the Middle Cornish scribal tradition. Jenner’s Cornish looks Cornish. I wager that the scribes of Glasney could have read it, and that Jordan and Tregear and the author of Bewnans Ke would likewise have found it to be familiar. And his spelling partakes of tota Cornicitas: it can write Middle and Late Cornish without linguistic compromise.

Jenner’s orthography provides a good, clear relationship between sound and spelling without diverging drastically from that of the traditional texts. He used diacritical marks for precision where necessary. His phonology is for the most part sound; he recognized the earlier phonemes /y/ and /ø/ by the way they had unrounded to /i/ and /e/ in Late Cornish. He endeavoured to describe the reduction of unstressed syllables to schwa using the symbols ŏ and ŭ. His section on grammar is wide-ranging and largely reliable. Jenner appears to regard the differences between Middle Cornish and Late Cornish as being more apparent than real; his work is generally free of the unwarranted purism of some later Revivalists. Of particular interest is his belief that it was undesirable to try to reconstruct a “foreign” accent based on “scientific affectation”. He recognized that the contact between Cornish and English must have led to similarities in phonology, and held that the sound and intonation of the English spoken in Cornwall should have a proper and positive influence on the pronunciation of Revived Cornish.

This re-edition is not a mere facsimile. I have added phonetic transcriptions in the IPA, to assist the modern reader in under­standing exactly which sounds Jenner was recommending. (Two characters used here, [ᵻ] and [ᵿ], are not used in the IPA proper; the Oxford English Dictionary uses them for reduced [ɪ] (schwi) and reduced [ʊ] (schwu). See Note 31 on page 52.) Jenner’s Cornish spellings have been kept as he wrote them, except where a typographical error or omission had rendered his intention obscure. Breton spellings, however, have been updated to modern orthography.

The book being newly typeset has benefited from some changes for the modern reader. Chapter headings and subsections within chapters have been numbered as sections for ease of citation. It will be seen that some of the numbers are rather long, but in fact they do reflect the complex net of nested, numbered, and lettered para­graphs with which Jenner structured his work. Biblical references use European digits rather than Roman, and standard references (“Matthew 2:1–20” rather than “St Matthew ii. 1–20”). Hypo­thetical forms are prefixed with an *asterisk as is now standard practice. Editorial comments of my own are given in {curly brackets}.

From time to time one encounters negative assessments by modern readers who have criticized Jenner for some of his social comments. It is true: today’s reader will find some of Jenner’s remarks to be what we now consider to be politically incorrect, indeed rather embarrassing. It must be remembered that the book was published at a time when such ideas were commonplace. This does not make them accurate or admirable; it is a reason, not an excuse. The most extreme of such comments have been moved to footnotes—where they can be safely ignored by the reader whose interests are merely linguistic.

I would like to give my thanks to Mary Beazley for encouraging me so wholeheartedly to re-publish the work of her Uncle Harry. I am most grateful to my colleagues Eddie Climo, Owen Cook, Thomas Leigh, Christian Semmens, Craig Weatherhill, and Nicholas Williams for their proof­reading, and for many useful comments on Jenner’s text and on my editorial additions. The responsibility for any lurking typographical or interpretative errors remains mine.

Jan 28

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of Jon Hanna’s trenchant look into the sociology of modern witchcraft, What thou wilt: Traditional and Innovative trends in Post-Gardnerian Witchcraft.

From the back cover:

The publication from 1954 of Gerald Gardner’s non-fiction works on witchcraft has led to the current public existence of two different trends of religious and magical belief and practice, both which identify themselves as Wicca. One form places a strong emphasis upon the transmission of traditional practices and a form of initiatory lineage similar to that practised by Gardner himself. The other covers a wider range of views on each of these aspects, but with the most common position being a strong distance between the traditional practices—giving a greater importance to innovation—and a complete or near-complete abandon ment of the concept of initiatory lineage.

Both trends often see themselves and each other as being within a wider religio-magical stream of Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft of which the innovative form is a larger part, though in different ways. The traditional view of the innovative form typically labels that form Eclectic even in cases where the practitioners would understand Eclectic differently, and considers it to be something outside of what it terms Wicca. The innovative form generally labels all Post-Gardnerian Pagan Witchcraft, or beyond, as Wicca, and as such recognizes all traditional practitioners as Wiccan but does not generally make more signi fi cant distinctions between the various schools.

The traditional stream considers the differences between the two streams as significant to the point of typicality while the innovative stream considers the differences as much less important. This book examines the differences and offers insights into both.

Jan 27

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a bilingual novel, written in English by Alan M. Kent and faced with a Cornish translation by Nicholas Williams: The Cult of Relics: Devocyon an Greryow.

From the back cover:

The Cult of Relics is a new novel by Alan M. Kent (author of Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! and Electric Pastyland), presented in a bilingual format, with a Cornish-language translation, Devocyon dhe Greryow, by Nicholas Williams. The story is set in Western Britain in the mid-1990s just after the Gulf War, and tells of three extraordinary people: of the New-Age Traveller Jude Fox, of the American photojournalist Eddie Hopkins, and of the Cornish-born archaeologist Robert Bolitho. The three characters discover a set of connections between them, stretching back to the early seventeenth century. Kent’s intriguing story weaves together their disparate lives with that of the mysterious “Stranger”, whose preservation of a curious holy relic becomes a focus for their collective need for communion and hope.

The Cult of Relics yw novel nowyth dhyworth Alan M. Kent (auctour a Proper Job, Charlie Curnow! hag a Electric Pastyland), hag yma va dyllys gans trailyans Kernowek Nicholas Williams, Devoycyon dhe Greryow. An whedhel-ma a gebmer le i’n West a Vreten Veur in cres an bledhydnyow mil, naw cans, peswar ugans ha deg, termyn cot warlergh Bresel an Morbleg. Yth eson ny ow metya ino gans try ferson, meur a les: Jûd Fox, Viajyores a’n Oos Nowyth; Eddie Hopkins, an fôtojornalyst Amerycan; ha’n hendhyscansyth dhia Gernow, Robert Bolitho. Ymowns y aga thry ow dyscudha bos kescolm intredhans dhyworth bledhydnyow avarr an seytegves cansvledhen. I’n whedhel hudol-ma yma Kent ow qwia warbarth bêwnans kenyver onen anodhans gans an “Stranjer” kevrînek. Crer sans ha stranj re beu gwethys ganso ev, ha’n dra-na yw an crespoynt a’n othem a’n jeves kettep onen a gowethyans ha govenek.

Jan 21

The Hunting of the Snark, Lewis Carroll’s magnificent 1890 nonsense poem, is now available from Evertype.

From the Foreword:

The Hunting of the Snark was first published in 1876, eleven years after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and four years after Through the Looking-Glass. It is a master piece of nonsense and is connected to Through the Looking-Glass by its use of vocabulary from the poem “Jabberwocky”.

The Hunting of the Snark is a strangely dark poem, and some critics believe that its themes—insanity and death—are rather too adult in nature for children’s literature. We know, nonetheless, that Lewis Carroll intended the poem to be enjoyed by children: he dedicated the book in acrostic verse to his young friend Gertrude Chataway, and signed some 80 presentation copies to other young readers. Many of those inscriptions were in the form of an acrostic based upon the name of the child to whom the book was presented.

Part of the pleasure of reading this book is in the inevitable musing about what it means. Its author, often asked to explain his work, invariably replies that he does not know. In his splendid book The Annotated Hunting of the Snark, Martin Gardner cites several such replies by Carroll:

  • For all such questions I have but one answer: “I don’t know!”
  • Of course you know what a Snark is? If you do, please tell me: for I haven’t an idea what it is like.
  • “Why don’t you explain the Snark?” … Let me answer it now—“because I ca’n’t.” Are you able to explain things which you don’t yourself understand?
  • As to the meaning of the Snark? I’m very much afraid I didn’t mean anything but nonsense!
  • I was walking on a hillside, alone, one bright summer day, when suddenly there came into my head one line of verse—one solitary line—“For the Snark was a Boojum, you see.” I knew not what it meant, then: I know not what it means, now; but I wrote it down: and, sometime afterwards, the rest of the stanza occurred to me, that being its last line: and so by degrees, at odd moments during the next year or two, the rest of the poem pieced itself together, that being its last stanza.

Well… the author has told us more than thrice. So it must be true. It is therefore open to readers of the poem to decide the question for themselves…

Dec 16

A New Alice in the Old Wonderland, Anna Matlack Richards’ 1895 novel in sequel to Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, is now available from Evertype.

From the back cover:

First published in 1895 in Philadelphia, thirty years after the initial publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Anna Matlack Richards’ A New Alice in the Old Wonderland is a splendid and worthy successor to Lewis Carroll’s original tales. Instead of Alice Liddell, it is Alice Lee who makes her way to Wonderland…

Richly illustrated in the style of John Tenniel by the author’s daughter, this book will delight any reader thirsting for a new adventure in Carroll’s wondrous world.

“I’m delighted to learn that A New Alice is in print again… I’ve read dozens of ‘Alice imitations’ in the course of my work, but Richards’ remains my favorite.” —Carolyn Sigler

From the Foreword:

Anna Matlack Richards (1835–1900) was a poet, playwright, and author, a Pennsylvania Quaker whose reputation as a poet had been established by the time she was twenty. At twenty-one, she married William Trost Richards, and both he and their daughter, Anna Richards Brewster, were American artists of some renown. Richards was fifty-five when she published her children’s fantasy, A New Alice in the Old Wonderland. Although an imitation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, it is also subtly critical of them, and its gentle satire is reflected in the sensitive illustrations in the style of Tenniel drawn by Anna Brewster. Carolyn Sigler has written on this aspect of A New Alice, which she considers outstanding among Alice imitations.

The judgement of critics, of course, does not affect the story. It is a pleasant task to edit a century-old book for re-publication and a new generation of readers. Here, as in my other editions of Alice books, I have kept to the book design inspired by Martin Gardiner’s Annotated Alice. I have edited certain features in Anna Richards’ text of 1895, in order to bring it closer to modern tastes in format and language. I have normalized “Your Majesty” to “your Majesty” and followed Carroll’s example in similar cases. I have preferred the more modern “eh?” to “hey?”, “recipe” to “receipt”, “curtsey” to “courtesy”, and “Jew’s harp” to “jewsharp”. I have regularized the capitalization of nouns in “Der leedle Johann Schmaus”. Where Richards follows Websterian spelling, I have altered to Oxford orthography. In places, Anna Richards’ 19th-century punctuation has been altered to conform to modern practice.

I have also edited out two notable features of the author’s dialect: Humpty Dumpty’s “should ’a’ been” for “should have been” and “hadn’t ’a’ had” for “hadn’t had” (neither warranted by Through the Looking-Glass); and the third-person present singular use of “don’t” for “doesn’t” through out. These dialect features are distinctively American (my mother’s mother, born in Eastern Pennsylvania in 1915, also used “don’t” for “doesn’t”) and seemed out of place in Lewis Carroll’s very English Wonderland. On the other hand, I have retained Richards’ use of Irish dialect by the workers (p. 102) and by the King of Clubs (p. 138); Irish immigrant dialect would have been well-known to Richards, though is unclear whether Richards’ use of Irish English is intended to convey positive or negative connotations, or if it’s just there for flavour.

Finally, since people are sure to ask… I felt that Carroll’s preference in writing “ca’n’t”, “sha’n’t”, and “wo’n’t” would be good for the conceit.

Michael Everson
Westport, 22 November 2009

Dec 10

Nautilus, a new novel in sequel to Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Seas and The Mysterious Island, by Craig Weatherhill, is now available from Evertype.

From the back cover:

1883
On a doomed volcanic island in the southern Pacific, a group of American castaways commit the body of an enigmatic genius to the deep, along with the secrets of an extraordinary life…
2014
the Deep Watch environmental ship Aurora mysteriously sinks with all hands in remote Antarctic waters and a subsequent oceanic sequence of strange sightings, antique gold bars and damaged ships blazes a trail around the world. Separate investigations by journalist Barrington Hobbes and Naval Intelligence officer Donall Lindsay lead both towards extreme danger on land and sea, a worldwide ecological conspiracy… … and an avenging legend!

Dec 08

Alice’s Adventures under Ground by Lewis Carroll now available from Evertype. The book has been newly-typeset and contains the original illustrations by Lewis Caroll.

From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll, the pen-name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, was tutor in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. He took a trip on 4 July 1862 in a rowing boat on the Thames in Oxford with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, Alice Liddell, the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church (she was ten years old), and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen), and Edith (eight). The three sisters asked Dodgson to tell them a story, and, reluctantly at first, he related the earliest version of this tale to them.

In 1865 the story in its finished form was published as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Two years before that, however, on 26 November 1864, Dodgson gave Alice the handwritten manuscript of Alice’s Adventures under Ground, illustrated by Dodgson himself. At Christmas 1886 a facsimile edition of the manuscript was published. Several further facsimile editions have since appeared, and in them all, Dodgson’s careful handwriting can be seen.
This edition sets the text in type, thus making it easier to read than in facsimile. It is certainly well worth reading, although it is shorter than the final form of the story—Alice’s Adventures under Ground is just over 15,500 words in length, whereas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is nearly twice as long, containing about 27,500 words. Here, as in my other editions of Alice books, I have kept to the book design inspired by Martin Gardiner’s Annotated Alice. Since this is a typeset edition, capital letters are used regularly at the beginning of quoted speech even though they are often omitted in the manu script; some other punctuation has been normalized. Many of these changes are also found in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

This edition also contains Carroll’s introductory essay “Who will Riddle me the How and the Why?” and, as appendices, his “Easter Greetings” and “Christmas Greet ings” to children. These were also published in the 1868 printed edition.

In the original manuscript, a photograph of Alice Liddell had been pasted in at the end of the story. It was discovered recently that beneath this photograph was a portrait of Alice, drawn by Lewis Carroll himself. Both photograph and hand-drawn picture are reproduced here opposite each other on pages 63 and 64.

“It must be a very pretty dance,” said Alice timidly.
“Would you like to see a little of it?” said the Mock Turtle.
“Very much indeed,” said Alice.
“Come, let’s try the first figure!” said the Mock Turtle to the Gryphon, “We can do it without lobsters, you know. Which shall sing?”
“Oh! You sing!” said the Gryphon, “I’ve forgotten the words.” So they began solemnly dancing round and round Alice, every now and then treading on her toes when they came too close, and waving their fore-paws to mark the time, while the Mock Turtle sang, slowly and sadly…

Nov 01

Wonderland Revisited and the Games Alice Played There by Keith Sheppard now available from Evertype. The book has been illustrated by Cynthia Brownell.

From the back cover:

“Excuse me,” said Alice to a small white Mouse in red shorts. “What precisely is a custard race?”

Did Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass leave you yearning for more? Join Alice on her new journey and meet the extraordinary inhabitants of Wonderland, both familiar and new.

If your bed turned into a boat and you found yourself “drifting off” in an entirely unexpected manner how would you find your way home? The Jack of Diamonds says it’s Alice’s own fault for being fast asleep—had she slept more slowly she wouldn’t be so far from home.

The Red Queen, the Mah-jong Dragons, even the Red King’s Gamekeeper, all seem helpful enough at first—but things never quite turn out the way Alice hopes!

Brimming with wordplay, nonsense verse, and a cast of eccentric characters each with their own peculiar logic, this adventure is faithful to the style of the originals, picking up the pen where Lewis Carroll put it down. Be swept away on a torrent of humour and madness. Alice is back!

Nov 01

Tá an leabhar Sciorrfhocail: Scéalta agus úrscéal le Panu Petteri Höglund le fáil ó Evertype anois. Otso Höglund, deartháir an údair, a mhaisigh an leabhar.

From the back cover:

Trí ghearrscéal agus úrscéal amháin le scríbhneoir Fionlannach a d’fhoghlaim a chuid Gaeilge ó scéalaithe agus ó scríbhneoirí móra na Gaeltachta sular tháinig sé go hÉirinn den chéad uair. Seo iad na scéalta Gaeilge a chum sé ina fhear óg dó, agus iad ar fáil faoi chlúdach leabhair anois. Scéalta iad faoi dhaoine uaigneacha a chaitheann slabhraí an uaignis díobh agus iad ag tóraíocht an ghrá.

“Ainmhian na Máistreása Óige”: Cailín cráifeach í Pia nár thuig bealaí an ghrá riamh. Ach anois, chuaigh an grá féin i luíochán roimpi.

“Craiceann”: Tháinig mac léinn óg ar cuairt chuig a thuismitheoirí le súil a chaitheamh ar na seanbhólaí. Céard a chasfar air cois an locha i gcroí na coille, meas tú? Céard eile ach an grá féin!

“Béarlóir Deireanach an Domhain”: Chuaigh an Ghaeilge ar fud an domhain. Níl ach Gaeilge Uladh ag na Meiriceánaigh, agus fágadh an Béarla in áit na leathphingine i Sasana féin. Cén cineál saoil atá ag an mBéarlóir deireanach ar an saol seo?

Tachtaimis an Grá Sin: Fear óg cúthail é Somhairle nach bhfuil de chairde aige ach ógánach uaigneach eile agus nach bhfuil de chaitheamh aimsire aige ach a bheith ag amharc ar na físghránnáin. Ach lá amháin, castar cailín air nach bhfacthas a leithéid riamh roimhe sin i Narkkaus, baile beag in Oirthear na Fionlainne.

Nov 01

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a Cornish version, translated by Nicholas Williams, of a book by Craig Weatherhill, Jowal Lethesow: Whedhel a’n West a GernowThe Lyonesse Stone.

From the back cover:

Termyn pòr hir alebma pow Lethesow inter Pedn an Wlas ha Syllan a wrug sedhy rag nefra in dadn an todnow. Ny dhienkys marnas Arlùth Trevelyan. Lies bledhen awosa yma whedhel coth an pow kellys ow tewheles dhe dropla Peny ha Jowan, whor ha broder, neb yw skydnys dhyworth Arlùth Trevelyan y honen. Destnys yns dhe gollenwel profecy coth, hag y degys aberth in gwlascor gudh a’n West a Gernow. Ena y a vÿdh maglednys i’n whilas auncyent rag power hag anvarwoleth. “Wàr an tu aral a’n park, dhyrag an magoryow overdevys, a sevy seyth marhak; linen gasadow a skeusow cosel. Tewl o aga mergh, tewl aga mentylly hir, ha down o an cùgollow ow keles aga fysmant.” Yma Arlùth Pengersek ow cresy y hyll ev spedya dre weres an drognerthow-ma. Saw kynth usy an whedhlow coth ow tasvewa, yma Peny ha Jowan Trevelyan a’ga sav intredho ev ha… Jowal Lethesow.

Long ago, the land of Lyonesse between Land’s End and the Isles of Scilly sank forever beneath the waves. Only the Lord Trevelyan escaped to tell the tale. Countless years later the legend of the Lost Land returns to haunt his descendants, who find themselves transported to the hidden realms of West Cornwall. Bound to fulfil an ancient prophecy, Penny and John Trevelyan are caught up in a centuries-old quest for power and immortality: “On the far side of the field, in front of the old, overgrown ruin, stood seven horsemen: a sinister line of motionless shadows. Dark were the horses on which they sat, dark their flowing robes and deep the cowls which hid their faces.” With the help of these evil forces, the Lord Pengersek believes he will win. But while ancient legends spring to life, it is Penny and John Trevelyan who stand between him and… The Lyonesse Stone.

Oct 25

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an edition of Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.


From the introduction:

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a tale of summer which Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) published for the first time in July 1865. Many of the characters in the book belong to a pack of cards. This story is a winter’s tale, which Carroll first published in December 1871. Much of this second story is based on the game of chess.

The heroine of the two books is Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Dodgson taught mathematics. Although Alice Liddell was born in 1852, twenty years later then Dodgson, she is kept in the two books as a little girl of seven years of age, the age she was when she Dodgson met her for the first time. It is clear from the pieces of poetry at the beginning and the end of this book that Carroll was very fond of Alice Liddell. One must remember, however, that Alice’s parents and Carroll fell out in 1864 and that he saw her very rarely after that date.

Oct 07

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a translation by Nicholas Williams of Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There in Irish.


From the back cover:

Scéal samhraidh atá in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland a d’fhoilsigh Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) den chéad uair i mí Iúil 1865. D’fhoilsigh Nicholas Williams leagan Gaeilge de sin sa bhliain 2003 faoin teideal Eachtraí Eilíse i dTír na nIontas. Is le paca cártaí a bhaineann roinnt mhaith de charachtair agus d’eachtraí an leabhair. Scéal geimhridh is ea an scéal seo Lastall den Scáthán agus a bhFuair Eilís Ann Roimpi agus is aistriúchán Gaeilge é ar Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There a d’fhoilsigh Carroll den chéad uair i mí na Nollag 1871. Ar chluiche fichille a bunaíodh formhór dá bhfuil sa dara scéal seo.

Is í banlaoch an dá leabhar Alice Liddell, iníon le Déan Christ Church, Oxford, áit a raibh Dodgson ina oide matamaitice. Cé gur sa bhliain 1852 a rugadh Alice Liddell, fiche bliain níos déanaí ná Dodgson, samhlaítear sa dá leabhar í mar chailín beag seacht mbliana d’aois, an aois a bhí aici nuair a casadh Dodgson den chéad uair uirthi. Is léir ó na píosaí filíochta ag tús agus ag deireadh an leabhair seo go raibh an-chion ag Carroll ar Alice Liddell. Ní mór cuimhneamh, áfach, gur éirigh idir tuismitheoirí Alice agus Carroll sa bhliain 1864 agus nach bhfaca sé ach go fíorannamh i ndiaidh an dáta sin í.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a tale of summer which Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) published for the first time in July 1865. Nicholas Williams published an Irish version of it in 2003 under the title Eachtraí Eilíse i dTír na nIontas. Many of the characters in the book belong to a pack of cards. This story, Lastall den Scáthán agus a bhFuair Eilís Ann Roimpi, is a winter’s tale, an is a translation of Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There which Carroll first published in December 1871. Much of this second story is based on the game of chess.

The heroine of the two books is Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Dodgson taught mathematics. Although Alice Liddell was born in 1852, twenty years later then Dodgson, she is kept in the two books as a little girl of seven years of age, the age she was when she Dodgson met her for the first time. It is clear from the pieces of poetry at the beginning and the end of this book that Carroll was very fond of Alice Liddell. One must remember, however, that Alice’s parents and Carroll fell out in 1864 and that he saw her very rarely after that date.

Jul 11

I am delighted to announce the publication of F. P. Walter’s translation of Vingt mille lieues sous les mers: Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Seas: An Underwater Tour of the World .

The book, available now in hardcover, was typeset by me using two Fournier fonts which were designed during Verne’s lifetime, and the book sports the original 1871 illustrations by Alphonse-Marie de Neuville agus Édouard Riou. The two maps have been (rather painstakingly) re-set in English.

From the back cover:

Jules Verne (1828–1905) was born in the Breton river town of Nantes, and had a lifelong passion for the sea. First as a Paris stockbroker, later as a celebrated author and yachtsman, he went on frequent voyages—to Britain, America, the Mediterranean. But the specific stimulus for this novel was an 1865 fan letter from a fellow writer, Madame George Sand. She praised Verne ’s two early novels Five Weeks in a Balloon (1863) and Journey to the Centre of the Earth (1864), then added: “Soon I hope you’ll take us into the ocean depths, your characters travelling in diving equipment perfected by your science and your imagination.” Thus inspired, Verne created one of literature’s great rebels, a freedom fighter who plunged beneath the waves to wage a unique form of guerilla warfare.

This translation is a faithful yet communicative rendering of the original French texts published in Paris by J. Hetzel et Cie.—the hardcover first edition issued in the autumn of 1871, collated with the softcover editions of the First and Second Parts issued separately in the autumn of 1869 and the summer of 1870. Although prior English versions have often been heavily abridged, this new translation is complete to the smallest substantive detail.

The translator, F. P. Walter, is a long-standing member of the North American Jules Verne Society. He currently lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Jun 07

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new cookbook by Patricia A. Moore with Jill Charlotte Stanford, with illustrations by Susan Koch.

From the back cover:

Goats have been a major source of food since time immemorial. Ancient cave paintings show the hunting of goats. They are also one of the oldest domesticated animals on earth. Goat meat can be stewed, curried, baked, grilled, barbecued, minced, canned, or made into sausage.

Goat milk and the cheese made from it has remained popular throughout history and still is consumed on a more extensive basis worldwide than cow’s milk.

In addition to food, goats provided early man with skins to make into clothing, with hair to spin into yarn and weave into cloth, and were then—as they are now—a symbol of wealth. To own many goats meant you were well-off and would never face starvation.

This book contains recipes from all over the world. They are easy, many of them quick to prepare, and all are absolutely delicious.

About the Authors
Patricia A. Moore spent 25 years in horticulture, running a land­scape maintenance business in the San Francisco Bay area before moving to Central Oregon in 1988. She raises Boer goats, serves on the State Board of the Oregon Meat Goat Producers and is involved with her local chapter of the OMGP. Cooking is Patricia’s passion. This book contains many wonderful recipes from her own kitchen, as well as recipes from other goat gourmets.

Jill Charlotte Stanford has been a writer, editor, and author since 1978. She is the author of Lamb Country Cooking (Culinary Arts 1994), The Cowgirl’s Cookbook (Globe Pequot 2008), and Going It Alone (Evertype 2008). As a Restaurant Reviewer as well as a Lamb Cook-Off Judge, she has a highly developed sense of good food. Jill lives and writes in Sisters, Oregon, with her faithful Australian Shepherd Elsa.

About the Illustrator
Susan Koch studied life drawing and watercolor at the American Academy of Art in Chicago, Illinois. Over the past thirty-five years her paintings have won many awards, including “Best of Show” and “People’s Choice” several years running in the Watercolor Society of Oregon annual shows.

Jun 07

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a Cornish edition of Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free’s Primer, translated by Eddie Foirbeis Climo.

From the back cover:

Yma an kensa lyver redya-ma têwlys rag an descor avar, be va flogh bò den leundevys. Nyns eus lies ger dyvers i’n lyver, nebes moy ès 200 warbarth. Y fÿdh kefys ino naw whedhel classyk: An Yar Vian Rudh, An Maw a Vara Jynjyber, An Venyn Goth ha’n Porhel, An Maw ha’n Avar, An Grampethen, Ÿdhnyk Lÿdhnyk, An Try Bogh Bewek, Trednar Bian, ha Kensa Gwias an Gefnysen Vian.

This first reader is aimed at early learners of Cornish, whether children or adults. It has a relatively small vocabulary of just over 200 words, and presents nine classic stories: The Little Red Hen, The Gingerbread Boy, The Old Woman and the Pig, The Boy and the Goat, The Pancake, Chicken Licken, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Little Tuppens, and Little Spider’s First Web.

Apr 26

Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free’s Primer, first published in 1910, is intended for early readers, and for those who teach them.


It has a relatively small vocabulary of just over 200 words, and presents nine classic stories: The Little Red Hen, The Gingerbread Boy, The Old Woman and the Pig, The Boy and the Goat, The Pancake, Chicken Little, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Little Tuppens, and Little Spider’s First Web.

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