Nov 30

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the translation by Emily Nonnen of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Swedish. It had previously been out of print since 1870.


From the introduction:

Lewis Carroll är en pseudonym: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson var författarens riktiga namn, och han var föreläsare i matematik i Christ Church i Oxford. Dodgson påbörjade berättelsen den 4 juli 1862 under en roddbåtstur på Themsen i Oxford tillsammans med pastorn Robinson Duckworth, med Alice Liddel (tio år gammal), dotter till dekanen vid Christ Church, och med hennes två systrar, Lorina (tretton år gammal), och Edith (åtta år gammal). Som framkommer av dikten i början av boken bad de tre flickorna Dodgson om en saga, och till att börja med motvilligt började han så berätta den första versionen av berättelsen för dem. Det finns många halvt dolda anspelningar på de fem genom hela boken, som till slut gavs ut 1865.

Denna bok erbjuder den moderna läsaren en nyutgåva av den första översättningen till svenska. Som den tredje översättningen någonsin av Alice till något språk utgavs Emily Nonnens översättning från 1870 ursprungligen i den stavning som var gällande under 1800-talet. Till denna utgåva har stavningen moderniserats, i enlighet med modern ortografi.

Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford. Dodgson began the story on 4 July 1862, when he took a journey in a rowing boat on the river Thames in Oxford together with the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, with Alice Liddell (ten years of age) the daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, and with her two sisters, Lorina (thirteen years of age), and Edith (eight years of age). As is clear from the poem at the begin ning of the book, the three girls asked Dodgson for a story and reluctantly at first he began to tell the first version of the .story to them. There are many half-hidden references made to the five of them throughout the text of the book itself, which was published finally in 1865

This book is a new edition of the first translation into Swedish, presented for the modern reader. The third translation of Alice into any language, Emily Nonnen’s 1870 version was originally published in a spelling typical of the nineteenth century. In preparing this edition, the spelling has been modernized according to the rules of current Swedish orthography.

Nov 29

More than a decade ago I applied for and was granted Irish citizenship. Some of my friends have heard the story: I applied through the Irish language, had my interview with the gardaí in Irish, and took my oath in Irish, to the evident delight of the barristers in the back of the courtroom, who were waiting for citizenship formalities to finish so the day’s court proceedings could begin.

In Ireland, as in most countries, one makes a verbal declaration using a prescribed formula when one is in court being granted citizenship. According to Acht Náisiúntachta agus Saoránachta Éireann 1986 (Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act, 1986), clause 4.15.e, one makes

dearbhú sa tslí fhorordaithe go mbeidh sé dílis don náisiún agus tairiseach don Stát.

or

a declaration in the prescribed manner, of fidelity to the nation and loyalty to the State.

And so I did. And so I have tried to act in the decade since: I have been faithful to our nation in representing her in International Standardization meetings, by supporting linguistic minorities of all kinds. I have expressed my loyalty to the State by ensuring that I vote regularly, by encouraging my fellows to do so, by carrying my passport proudly, and recently by joining a political party so I could try to make a difference, in a small way, to bettering life here for everyone fortunate enough to live in this beautiful country.

How gutted I am that “our” Taoiseach (Prime Minister) has expressed nothing but contempt for our nation and for our State. Knowing that 80% of the electorate and half the parliament has called for a General Election so that the people can give a government a mandate to help us out of the economic crisis we are in, he has nevertheless expressed nothing but the highest arrogance and selfishness, a grubby and cynical clinging on to power at all costs. Despite his obvious incompetence and the obvious incompetence of all his cabinet, he has slimpered through financial negotiations with the EU and IMF, gaining nothing for us but a debt that we will doubtless one day be forced to default on, not to save our country, but to bolster and protect German investors who put their money in a bank they doubtless knew was behaving recklessly. I thought that capitalism meant that investors were expected to bear the risk of their investments failing. Not that the populace of a free country should be made to pay for such failures.

“Slimper” is a portmanteau word. It is a little like simpering, and a little like slinking, accompanied with a bit of a pathetic whine.

We have been made like unto serfs to a handful of German investor-lords.

By slimpering Brian Cowan and Brian Lenihan and their “Republican” comrades. People who were born here. People who did not have to make a promise or take an oath to be worthy to live here. People who ran our republic into the ground and then kept on digging. To save their faces. To save their friends at Anglo. To save their arses from whatever secrets their friends at Anglo knew.

These people have committed what can only be called treason. Even if it was inevitable that we take some sort of help (it is a high-interest LOAN, not a BAIL-OUT), these spineless cretinous cowards could not even allow the Irish people a general election to give a mandate to a government to lead them through these dark times. Their reckless and craven egotism beggars belief. Their ministerial pensions should be stripped from them and they should be tried and offered exile or prison.

It is difficult to think of adjectives sufficient to describe their villainy. All we can hope for is for every single one of them to lose their seats in the election, and for this to be a sea-change in Irish politics, and that we look back on this time as the time when we learned to put parochial, tribal, civil-war cronyism behind us.

So very many people will emigrate now. They will have no choice. Young people in their twenties and thirties have already begun doing it. I’ve made some comments on Facebook about how I’m considering Iceland. And I do like Iceland. And Icelandic. A lot. But I have chosen to be dílis don náisiún and tairiseach don Stát, and I hope that I can find the strength and honour to stay here and try still to make Ireland a better place for myself and my fellow citizens.

And hope that one day Fianna Fáil will be nothing more a bogeyman name to frighten children with.

Nov 29

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an edition of Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams.


About the book:

Y feu screfys Enys Tresour gans Robert Louis Stevenson i’n bledhynyow 1880 hag 1881. Dalethys veu in Braemar in Scotlond, le may whrug y das gwil gweres dhodho gans y brevyans y honen a vêwnans in gorholyon. Gorfednys veu an novel pàn esa Stevenson in Davos rag an secùnd treveth in gwâv an vledhen 1881-1882. Enys Tresour, neb a dheuth in mes pàn o an auctour udnek bledhen warn ugans bloodh, o y kensa romans hir, ha pàn veu an lyver dyllys avell lyver, Stevenson a recêvas dredho rag an kensa prës sowena in lagasow an bobel. An whedhel-ma a dhalathas apperya in mis Hedra 1881 i’n lyver termyn Sowsnek gelwys Young Folks. I’n termyn-na Cog an Mor, bò Enys Tresour o an tîtel, saw pàn veu dyllys an novel avell lyver in mis Mê 1883, an hanow o Enys Tresour yn udnyk, ha’n hanow-na a gemeras y le in mesk tîtlys a lyvrow classyk liesgweyth cotha. Y fëdh gwelys i’n lyver-ma delinyansow bryntyn Louis Rhead, a veu dyllys rag an kensa prës i’n vledhen 1915. Nicholas Williams a drailyas an lyver-ma dhe Gernowek. Ev a drailyas Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland gans Lewis Carroll dhe Gernowek ha dhe Wodhalek Wordhen kefrës.

“Pymthek den wàr gofyr an marow—
Yô-hô-hô, ha botel dowr tobm!
Dewas ha’n Jowl a ladhas y barow—
Yô-hô-hô ha botel dowr tobm!”

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos, Switzerland in the winter of 1881-1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915.

“Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!”

Nov 29

Evertype is pleased to announce the publication of an edition of Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson.


About the book:

It was in 1880 and 1881 that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island, which was begun at Braemar, Scotland, where his father aided him with suggestions from his own seafaring experiences. It was finished in the course of his second visit to Davos, Switzerland in the winter of 1881-1882. Treasure Island, which appeared when the author was thirty-one, was his first long romance, and it brought to him his first taste of popular success, when the story was published in book form. It was in October 1881, that this story began to appear as a serial in an English magazine called Young Folks. The title then was The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island, but when published in book form in May 1883, the name was simply Treasure Island, a name which has taken its place among the titles of far older classics. This edition contains the superb illustrations of Louis Rhead, which were first published in 1915.

“Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest—
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!”

Nov 18

The Wikipedia has a splendid article on a British poster from 1939 called Keep Calm and Carry On. It was intended to raise the morale of the British public under the threat of impending invasion.

Since the failed Irish government coalition between Fianna Fáil and the Greens has driven Ireland to enter into talks with the EU and IMF about a bailout, it seems clear that the Irish public at large is getting more and more despondent as the days and weeks go on. Accordingly, to raise the morale of the Irish public under the threat of the impending loss of Irish sovereignty, I offer the following:

Keep Calm and Carry On

Please feel free to share it. You can show your determination to weather the crisis with an inspirational coffee mug! Visit the Keep Calm and Carry On IRL Café Press shop! I bought two mugs for myself today. When I’m drinking a cuppa I’ll take some comfort in my calmness. Perhaps. There’s a North American Keep Calm and Carry On IRL Café Press shop too.

And now there’s a Keep Calm and Carry On Ireland Facebook page, too, for this little bit of cheerfulness.

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